Oxford’s current and emeritus academics named in the New Year honours range from world-famous runner Sir Roger Bannister to experts in public health and Spanish Civil War writing.

Roger Bannister

Roger BannisterMembers of the University have been recognised in the New Year’s Honours list for 2017. Here we offer a full list, headed by details on a selection of notable honorands.
 

Sir Roger Bannister, CBE, former Master and Honorary Fellow of Pembroke College, is made a Companion of Honour for services to sport. Sir Roger, 87, becomes one of only 54 living people to have received the honour. He said: ‘I have always been astonishingly lucky in my career, which has encompassed both sport and neurology. I never anticipated or predicted or wished particularly for a further honour but I am delighted to receive this.’ Sir Roger is pictured above, collapsing after breaking the four-minute mile record, at the Iffley Road Sports Track in 1954; and right at the 60th anniversary celebrations at Exeter College.

Professor Nicholas White, OBE, Professor of Tropical Medicine at Oxford and Mahidol University, Thailand, Fellow of St John’s College, and Chairman of the Wellcome Trust's South East Asian Research Units, is appointed a Knight Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George for services to tropical medicine and global health. Professor White’s research interests at present include the pathophysiology and treatment of severe malaria, the prevention of anti-malarial drug resistance using artemisinin-based combinations, and the biology of relapse in vivax malaria.
 
Professor Colin Mayer, Peter Moores Professor of Management Studies and Professorial Fellow of Wadham College, is appointed CBE for services to business education and the administration of justice in the economic sphere. Professor Mayer was the first professor at the Saïd Business School and is an expert on all aspects of corporate finance, governance and taxation, the regulation of financial institutions, and the role of the corporation in contemporary society. He is also an Honorary Fellow of Oriel College and St Anne's College. Professor Mayer said: ‘It’s a huge honour and I’m extremely grateful. The business school has been very successful and I'm tremendously proud of it.’
New Year's Honours 2017Dr Premila Webster, Professor Nicholas White, Professor Colin Mayer and Professor John Furlong are among the Oxonians receiving New Year’s Honours
 

Professor Valentine Cunningham, Emeritus Professor of English Language and Literature and Emeritus Fellow and Lecturer in English at Corpus Christi College, is appointed OBE for services to scholarship and the understanding of the humanities. Professor Cunningham works widely across literary-historical-cultural periods, areas and genres, as well as in literary theory, and has published books on subjects as diverse as the Victorian novel, the writing of the Spanish Civil War, and King Lear.

Professor John Furlong, Emeritus Professor of Education and Emeritus Fellow of Green Templeton College, is appointed OBE for services to research in education and government. A former director of Oxford’s Department of Education and a former president of the British Educational Research Association, Professor Furlong is a member of research groups encompassing learning and new technologies, teacher education, and professional learning.
 

Dr Premila Webster, Director of Public Health Education and Training, Nuffield Department of Population Health, is appointed MBE for services to public health.

The full list of Oxonians in the New Year Honours list is as follows:

Companion of Honour (CH)

Sir Roger Bannister (Merton College, 1946) for services to sport.

Professor Sir Alec Jeffreys (Merton College, 1968) for services to medical research and society.

Baroness Mary Warnock (Lady Margaret Hall, 1942) for services to charity and children with special educational needs.

Baroness Shirley Williams (Somerville College, 1948) for services to political and public life.

Knight Bachelor

Sir Julian Brazier (Brasenose College, 1972) for political and public service.

Sir Steve Webb (Hertford College, 1983) for political and public service.

Knight Commander of the Bath (KCB)

Sir Mark Lowcock (Christ Church, 1982) for public service particularly to international development.

Companion of the Order of the Bath (CB)

Professor Vernon Gibson (Balliol College, 1980) for services to defence.

Knight Commander of the British Empire (KBE)

The Rt Revd James Jones (Wycliffe Hall) for services to bereaved families and justice.

Dame Commander Order of the British Empire (DBE)

Dame Vera Baird (St Hilda's College () for services to women and equality.

Dame Helen Fraser (St Anne's College, 1967) for services to education.

Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE)

Mr Ronald Emerson (Green Templeton College, 1997) for services to international banking and the financing of small and medium-sized enterprises.

Dr Andrew Garrad (New College, 1972) for services to renewable energy.

Professor Anthony Grayling (Magdalen College, 1976) for services to philosophy.

Professor Niki Lacey (New College, 1979) for services to law, justice and gender politics.

Professor Colin Mayer (Oriel College, 1971) for sevices to business education and the administration of justice in the economic sphere.

Mr Malcolm Newsam (Keble College, 1973) for services to children's social care.

Mr Michael Pragnell (St John's College, 1965) for services to cancer research.

Professor John Pyle (Jesus College, 1972) for services to atmospheric chemistry and environmental Science.

Ms Justine Roberts (New College, 1986) for services to the economy.

Professor Dai Smith (Balliol College, 1963) for services to culture and the arts in Wales.

Ms Jenny Waldman (St Anne's College, 1979) for services to the arts.

Mr Simon Walker (Balliol College, 1971) for services to business and the economy.

Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE)

Professor Vidal Ashkenazi (Hertford College, 1963) for services to science.

Ms Alison Baum (St Catherine's College, 1989) for services to tackling child health inequalities.

Ms Emma Chamberlain (St Catherine's College, 1979) for services to government tax policy.

Professor Valentine Cunningham (Keble College, 1963) for services to scholarship and understanding of humanities.

Mr Toby Eccles (St Edmund Hall, 1991) for services to social enterprise and investment and charity.

Dr Katy Emck (St Catherine's College, 1983) for services to the rehabilitation of offenders.

Professor Simon Frith (Balliol College, 1964) for services to higher education and popular music.

Professor John Furlong (Department of Education () for services to research in education and government.

Mr Brian Hooper (Executive Education) for services to education.

Mr Stephen Maddock (New College, 1987) for services to music particularly in the West Midlands.

Lieutenant Pete Reed (Oriel College (2003) for services to rowing.

Ms Caroline Ross (Somerville College, 1993) for legal services to international climate change negotiations.

Mr Keith Thompson (Wadham College, 1971) for services to humanitarian relief.

Mr Andrew Triggs Hodge (St Catherine's College (2004) for services to rowing.

Mr Crispin Truman (St Peter's College, 1982) for services to heritage and charitable foundations.

Professor Sally Wheeler (Lady Margaret Hall, 1982) for services to higher education in Northern Ireland.

Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE)

Mr Paul Bennett (Kellogg College (2012) for services to rowing.

Professor Deborah Bowman (Lincoln College, 1987) for services to medical ethics.

Mr Trevor Cooper (Hertford College, 1968) for services to ecclesiastical heritage.

Ms Tricia Dodd (St Hugh's College, 1975) for services to statistics and research.

Mr Sam Duerden (St Edmund Hall (2003) for services in response to humanitarian crises.

Mrs Rachel Griffiths (Somerville College, 1967) for services to vulnerable people.

Dr Kamila Hawthorne (Somerville College, 1978) for services to general practice.

Ms Anne-Marie Imafidon (Keble College (2006) for services to young women within STEM sectors.

Mr Constantine Louloudis (Trinity College (2010) for services to rowing.

Ms Fiona Sampson (Harris Manchester College, 1989) for services to literature and the literary community.

Mr Robert Simpson (Trinity College, 1958) for services to the UK's audio-visual industry.

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This article is an edited version of an original published at the Oxford University News and Events page, and is reproduced with kind permission. Photos of Roger Bannister © Oxford University Images / Oxfordshire History Centre (1954) and Oxford University Images / John Cairns (2014). Photos of Dr Premila Webster, Professor Nicholas White, Professor Colin Mayer and Professor John Furlong also reproduced with permission.

Comments

By Jonathan Cox
on

I have never understood why people are given state honours for doing a good job - which is what they are paid to do in the first place. Nor can I understand the mentality of those who would happily receive honours awarded in the name of an Empire we do not have and in the name of a ruler who is subsidised by taxpayers - despite having four huge mansions to live in. We need an honours system overhaul and we need to give the highest honours to those who have made a significant contribution to humanity by the *voluntary* work they have done as with the chap who has worked as a volunteer with the Samaritans for over 50 years. We have gone mad.

By Robert John Nicholas
on

Sir Roger, You deserve all the good things that come your way. God Bless

By Ian Hardee
on

Mr Cox, while I agree with the idea that there is no merit in giving state honours to someone who is merely ‘doing a good job’, regardless of whether or not it ‘is what they are paid to do in the first place’, I do feel that there is merit in giving state honours to those who go far above and beyond what is required of them, or whose efforts make a significant contribution to society, whether that be in tangible form (cancer research or social work, for example) or who serve as an inspiration to others (an area where, I feel, Sir Roger certainly qualifies). If someone dedicates their working life to the benefit of humanity, why should that preclude recognition for special achievement?

Leaving aside historical references to Empire — which do clearly remain purely for historical reasons — I also take issue with your assertion that our monarch is ‘a ruler who is subsidised by taxpayers’. Neither part of this statement — that she is our ‘ruler’ in any meaningful sense, ours being a constitutional democratic monarchy, nor that she is subsidised by taxpayers, is correct. A brief amount of research would show that when the monarchy was on the brink of bankruptcy as a result of self-financing, the Crown (in the person of King George III, who simultaneously agreed that he was no longer to rule in person) agreed with Parliament to hand over income from the Crown Estates in exchange for receiving funding from the Civil List. The latter has now been abolished (since 2012) and replaced by the Sovereign Support Grant, an amount tied to a proportion of the income from the Crown Estates. The net result? The Crown Estate hands over the ‘excess’ income from the Crown Estates (that which does not cover the Sovereign Support Grant) to HM Treasury. The monarch, Mr Cox, subsidises the taxpayers, not the other way around.

May I also point out that although constitutionally the sovereign is not bound to pay tax, she has voluntarily agreed to do so on her own private income?

There are undoubtedly many flaws with the UK's systems. However, I would challenge you to identify any country which combines, in a better way than the UK, a sovereign system which demonstrates as much value for money. Every country I am aware of has costs associated with having a head of state. How many of them attract business, tourism and ‘brand awareness’ to the extent of the British Monarchy? How many of them generate a cash return to their country's treasury?

I am interested to see your response, Mr Cox.

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