Pendarell Kent

18 August 1937 – 30 December 2013

The banker Pendarell Hugh (Pen) Kent CBE died on 30 December 2013, aged 76. Born in Marlow, he was educated at University College School, London, and Jesus College, Oxford, where he read French. After graduating in 1959 he did his two years’ national service in the Intelligence Corps. He then joined the Bank of England, rising to become an Associate Director in 1988 and an Executive Director from 1994 until his retirement in 1997. He was particularly involved first in international finance and then in City affairs. Both while at the Bank of England and especially after retirement he was involved in many charitable organisations. He was survived by his wife Jill and their two children.

Hilary Eccles-Williams

5 October 1917 – 29 December 2013

Hilary a’Beckett Eccles-Williams CBE, export merchant, died on 29 December 2013, aged 96. Born in Oxford, the son of Cyril Eccles-Willliams, headmaster of Summer Fields School, he was educated at Eton College and Brasenose College, Oxford. On the outbreak of the Second World War he joined the Royal Artillery, serving with the British Expeditionary Force in France, and later taking part in the Normandy landings. Severely wounded a few weeks later, on recovery he taught briefly at Eton before joining the export firm Rabone Petersen, of which he eventually became managing director and chairman. He claimed to have sold brown sauce to the Peruvians and refrigerators to the Inuit; in his Who’s Who entry he included that he had travelled 900,000 miles on export business. He was at one point President of the Association of British Chambers of Commerce, and was active in the Conservative Party. He was survived by his wife Jeanne and their six children.

David Harris

14 December 1930 – 25 December 2013

The archaeologist and pre-historian David Russell Harris FBA died on 25 December 2013, aged 83. Born in London, he was educated at St Christopher School, Letchworth, and, after national service in the RAF, University College, Oxford, where he read Geography, graduating in 1953 and going on to take a BLitt in 1955. He taught at the University of California, Berkeley, and Queen Mary College, London, before joining the staff of University College, London, in 1964, remaining there until his retirement in 1998, from 1979 as Professor of Human Environment. His publications focused on the origins of agriculture and human ecology in many different parts of the world and, influenced by what he saw first-hand, sought to break down the idea that there was a simple historical and geographical divide between ‘hunter gatherer’ and ‘farming’ societies. He was elected an FBA in 2004. He was survived by his wife Helen and their four daughters.

Sir Michael Butler

27 February 1927 – 24 December 2013

The diplomat Sir Michael Dacres Butler GCMG died on 24 December 2013, aged 86. He was educated at Winchester College and, after national service, Trinity College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics. On graduating in 1950 he immediately joined the Foreign Service. His postings included New York, Baghdad, Paris, Geneva and Washington before he specialised in European affairs as Head of the European Integration Department (1972-4), Assistant Under-Secretary in charge of European Community Affairs (1974-6), Deputy Under-Secretary of State (1976-9) and Ambassador and Permanent UK Representative to the European Communities (1979-85), playing a key part in the negotiations leading to a British budget rebate. He was knighted KCMG in 1980 and promoted GCMG in 1984. Following his retirement from the Diplomatic Service he took up a number of chairmanships and directorships, and was also active in policy think-tanks. He was a noted authority on Chinese porcelain, on which he published a number of books. He was survived by his wife Ann and their four children.

John Goldman

30 November 1938 – 24 December 2013

The haematologist John Michael Goldman died on 24 December 2013, aged 75. Born in London, he was educated at Westminster School and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read Psychology, Philosophy and Physiology, graduating in 1960. He completed his medical studies at St Bartholomew’s Hospital, London, and took his Oxford BM in 1963. After further training in haematology and oncology he joined the staff of the MRC Leukaemia Unit, soon also being appointed a consultant at the Hammersmith Hospital. He published more than 750 scientific papers, and was credited with a number of breakthroughs in the treatment of leukaemia. From 1987 to 2010 he was medical director of the Anthony Nolan Bone Marrow Trust. He was president at various times of the International Society for Experimental Hematology and the European Hematology Association. He was survived by two daughters and a son.

Ernest Nicholson

26 September 1938 – 22 December 2013

The Reverend Professor Ernest Wilson Nicholson FBA, biblical scholar and Provost of Oriel College, Oxford, from 1993 to 2003, died on 22 December 2013, aged 75. Born in Co. Armagh, Northern Ireland, he was educated at Portadown Technical School, having failed the 11-plus, but after four years he was accepted into Portadown College, the town’s grammar school, from where he went on to study at Trinity College, Dublin, where he read Theology, and Glasgow University, where he took a PhD for a thesis on Deuteronomy. He lectured at Trinity College, Dublin, and, after ordination, Cambridge, where he was chaplain then dean of Pembroke College. He became Oriel Professor of the Interpretation of Holy Scripture and a fellow of Oriel College, Oxford, in 1979. From 1993 to 2003 he was a Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University. He was a highly regarded scholar of the Pentateuch and its historical interpretation. He was elected an FBA in 1987. He was survived by his wife Hazel and three daughters, one son having predeceased him.

Peter Geach

29 March 1916 – 21 December 2013

Peter Thomas Geach FBA, philosopher, died on 21 December 2013, aged 97. Born in London, he was brought up by relatives in Cardiff, and was educated at Llandaff Cathedral School, Clifton College, Bristol, and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Literae Humaniores, graduating in 1938. After part-time teaching in Cambridge he joined the staff of the University of Birmingham in 1951, moving to Leeds as Professor of Logic in 1966; he remained there until his retirement in 1981, but also lectured frequently in Europe (including Poland, his mother’s birthplace) and the USA. A Roman Catholic convert, he was particularly known for his work on philosophy of religion, logic, and the history of philosophy. He was elected an FBA in 1965. His wife, the philosopher Elizabeth Anscombe, died in 2001. He was survived by their seven children.

Robert Winser

26 December 1921 – 20 December 2013

Robert Stephen Winser, colonial official, died on 20 December 2013, aged 91. The son of a clergyman, he was educated at Bradfield School, Corpus Christi College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, and Sandhurst. Although expecting to serve with the King’s African Rifles, he found himself drafted into the Colonial Service, serving in Kenya from 1943 until a year after independence in 1964, latterly as senior district commissioner in northern Kenya. On leaving Kenya he joined the staff of the British Standards Institute, where he helped introduce the kite mark as an international standard for manufactured goods. His wife Ann predeceased him; they had two children.

Paul Torday

1 August 1946 – 18 December 2013

The businessman and author Paul Torday died on 18 December 2013, aged 67. He was born in Croxdale, Co. Durham, and educated at the Royal Grammar School, Newcastle, and Pembroke College, Oxford, where he read English and was tutored by J.R.R. Tolkien. After graduating he worked in market research then joined the family engineering firm, Torday & Carlisle, founded by his grandfather. After selling the company in the 1990s he managed and owned other manufacturing and engineering firms in the North-East. A keen fisherman himself, he scored a success with his first novel, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen (2007). The novel’s satirical edge was lost in the film version, released in 2011. Torday went on to write six further novels in different genres, though none with the same success. He was survived by his wife Penelope, two stepsons, and the two sons of his first marriage.

Hugh Arnold

15 January 1921 – 17 December 2013

Hugh Wilson Arnold DSC, naval and intelligence officer, died on 17 December 2013, aged 92. Born in Dublin, the son of a barrister, he was educated at St Paul’s School, London, before volunteering for the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. He served mainly in motor launches, and won the DSC for his bravery during the raid on St Nazaire on 1942. He also took part in covering action during the Normandy landings, during which he was severely wounded. Invalided out, on recovery he went to Pembroke College, Oxford, where he read English, graduating in 1947. He then joined MI5, with postings in Aden, Cyprus, Singapore and elsewhere. He was a talented sportsman, and played cricket for the Oxford University Authentics and rugby for Surrey. He was survived by his wife Pamela and their two children.

Paul Doe

8 September 1931 – 15 December 2013

The musicologist Paul Maurice Doe died on 15 December 2013, aged 82. Born in Norfolk, he was educated at the City of Norwich School and Worcester College, Oxford, where he read Music, graduating in 1952. He was also a founder member and lead violin of the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain. After two years’ national service with the RAF he returned to undertake postgraduate research. He then taught at Aberdeen and Birmingham universities before becoming Professor of Music at the University of Exeter, a post he held from 1971 to 1991. He was noted for his studies of Tudor polyphony, and especially the work of Thomas Tallis. He was survived by the four children of his first marriage.

Vere Hodge

31 October 1919 – 15 December 2013

The Rev Prebendary (Francis) Vere Hodge MC, clergyman, died on 15 December 2013, aged 94. Born in Dorset, after Sherborne School he went to Worcester College, Oxford, to read English, but in 1940, before taking a degree, he enlisted in the Royal Artillery. He subsequently served with the Parachute Brigades in Sicily (where he earned his MC) and in Normandy. After demobilisation he trained as a priest, being ordained in 1948. He ministered mainly in rural parishes in the West Country, and in 1979 was appointed a Prebendary of Wells Cathedral. He was also chairman of the trustees of Glastonbury Abbey. He was survived by three children, his wife Eleanor having predeceased him.

Lord Roberts of Conwy

10 July 1930 – 14 December 2013

(Ieuan) Wyn Pritchard Roberts, Baron Roberts of Conwy PC, politician, died on 14 December 2013, aged 83. Born on Anglesey, the son of a Calvinistic Methodist minister, and brought up speaking Welsh, he was educated at Beaumaris County School, Harrow School, and University College, Oxford, where he read Modern History, graduating in 1952. He worked as a journalist for two years before joining the BBC, moving to Television Wales & West, where he became Welsh Controller from 1964 to 1968. He was Conservative MP for Conway (renamed Conwy in 1983) from 1970 to 1997, and was a junior minister at the Welsh Office from 1979 to 1994. Knighted in 1990 and made a life peer in 1997, he was for ten years opposition front bench spokesman on Welsh affairs in the House of Lords. He was survived by his wife Enid and two of their three sons.

Peter Gilbert

15 April 1950 – 12 December 2013

Peter Duncan Gilbert, social worker, died on 12 December 2013, aged 63. Born in Jersey into a Roman Catholic family, he was educated at Worth Abbey in Sussex, followed by Sandhurst. He saw service in Northern Ireland but resigned his commission and in 1971 went to Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. After completing an MA in Social Work at the University of Sussex he worked as a social worker in Sussex, London, Kent and Staffordshire before becoming director of social services in Worcestershire from 1997 to 2001. Subsequently he became a leading authority on spirituality (of both clients and practitioners) in social work and the health service, holding visiting professorships at Staffordshire and Worcester universities, and at the Birmingham and Solihull Foundation NHS Trust. He was survived by his wife Sue and their three daughters.

Dame Florence Baron

7 October 1952 – 9 December 2013

Dame Florence Jacqueline Baron DBE, barrister and judge, died on 9 December 2013, aged 61. The daughter of an electrical engineer, she spent her early childhood in Southern Rhodesia before being educated at Jersey College for Girls and St Hugh’s College, Oxford, where she switched from Philosophy, Politics and Economics to Jurisprudence. Called to the bar by the Middle Temple in 1976, she established a formidable reputation in matrimonial law, acting among others for the Prince of Wales in his divorce from Diana, Princess of Wales. She took silk in 1995 and was appointed a Recorder in 1999, a Deputy High Court Judge in 2000 and a High Court Judge in 2003. In 2013 she married her long-term partner, John Tonna, who survived her.

Sir John Cornforth

7 September 1917 – 8 December 2013

The Nobel prize-winning chemist Sir John Cornforth FRS, AC, CBE, died on 8 December 2013, aged 96. Born in Sydney, Australia, the son of a teacher, he developed otosclerosis, and was completely deaf by the age of 20. He was educated at Sydney High School, the University of Sydney, and, as an 1851 Exhibition scholar, the University of Oxford, where he took his DPhil in 1941, and where he stayed until 1946, to work on penicillin. He then worked for the Medical Research Council in London and from 1962 as co-director of Shell’s Milstead Laboratory of Chemical Enzymology before becoming a Royal Society Research Professor at the University of Sussex in 1975, the year he won the Nobel Prize. He undertook groundbreaking research on steroids, and on the way enzymes make biological molecules such as cholesterol. Besides the Nobel Prize, he won many awards. He was knighted in 1977. He was survived by his three children, his wife Rita (a fellow 1851 Exhibition scholar) having predeceased him.

Annabel Freyberg

16 August 1961 – 8 December 2013

The journalist Annabel Pauline Jekyll Freyberg died on 8 December 2013, aged 52. The granddaughter of General Lord Freyberg VC, she was educated at Heathfield, Marlborough College, Christ Church, Oxford, where she read English, and Kingston School of Art. She worked for the Centre for Policy Studies, the Catholic Herald, The World of Interiors, The Independent, and the Evening Standard before joining the staff of the Telegraph Magazine as a features writer. She chronicled with searing honesty both the illness of her daughter Blossom (who died of cancer at the age of nine in 2012) and her own illness with the same disease. She was survived by her husband, the writer Andrew Barrow, and their son Otto.

Gerald Scott

28 July 1927 – 8 December 2013

The chemist and environmentalist Gerald Scott died on 8 December 2013, aged 86. Born in North Shields, he read Chemistry at Balliol College, Oxford, graduating in 1952 and taking his BSc in 1956. He then joined ICI Dyestuffs Division, and became manager of works research and development at Grangemouth. From 1967 to 1989 he was professor of polymer science at the University of Aston. He then developed a consultancy practice and carried out funded projects with international collaborators. He filed some 60 international patents, was an authority on polymer degradation and stabilisation, and was a pioneer in the field of time-controlled biodegradable (or oxo-biodegradable) plastics. He was survived by his wife Gwen and their three sons.

Michael Ryle

30 July 1927 – 7 December 2013

Michael Thomas Ryle, parliamentary official, died on 7 December 2013, aged 86. The son of an engineer (and a relative of the philosopher Gilbert Ryle), he was educated at the Royal Grammar School, Newcastle, and, after national service in the Royal Artillery in the Far East, Merton College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1951. After graduation he immediately joined the Clerk’s Department of the House of Commons, eventually becoming Clerk of Committees from 1987 to 1989, when he retired. He edited or contributed to numerous books and journals on Parliament and the House of Commons in particular, and after his retirement was closely involved in advising various eastern European states on parliamentary procedures. He was survived by his wife Bridget and their three children.

John Albery

5 April 1936 – 3 December 2013

(Wyndham) John Albery FRS, FRSC, chemist, and Master of University College, Oxford, from 1989 to 1997, died on 3 December 2013, aged 77. He was educated at Winchester College and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Chemistry, graduating in 1960 and taking his DPhil in 1964. He was a lecturer in physical chemistry and fellow of University College until 1978 (and a notably successful tutor for admissions from 1968 to 1975), when he took a chair in physical chemistry at Imperial College, London, before returning to University College as Master. As a scientist he was a leader in the field of electrochemistry and enzyme kinetics, and was elected an FRS in 1985. As Master, he was a colourful figure, as befitted his background in the theatrical Albery family, and someone who had once written for the television series That Was The Week That Was. He was unmarried.

A. C. Cilliers

21 November 1933 – 3 December 2013

The legal scholar Andries Charl Cilliers died on 3 December 2013, aged 81. Born in Stellenbosch, South Africa, the son of a physicist, he was educated at the University of Stellenbosch, and, as a Rhodes Scholar, at Pembroke College, Oxford, where he took a second degree in Jurisprudence, in 1958. On his return to South Africa he practised as an advocate in Cape Town for seven years, then joined the staff of the University of Port Elizabeth, where he taught until his retirement in 1993. He wrote extensively, including textbooks on the law of costs and human rights. He was survived by his wife Bettie and their four children.

Leslie Paine

4 October 1921 – 2 December 2013

Leslie Harold William Paine OBE, hospital administrator, died on 2 December 2013, aged 92. Educated at the City of Bath School, he served during the Second World War as a pilot in the Fleet Air Arm. On demobilisation he went up to Pembroke College, Oxford, where he read English, graduating in 1948. After taking the two-year King’s Fund course for hospital administrators he worked in the National Health Service, and from 1963 to 1985 was House Governor at the Bethlem Royal and Maudsley Hospital, his work extending to arranging the training of psychiatrists and the editing of publications. He was appointed OBE in 1970. He was married twice but both wives predeceased him; he was survived by his partner, Christine, and his daughter, Bryony.

Sir John Zochonis

2 October 1929 – 30 November 2013

Sir John Basil Zochonis DL, businessman and philanthropist, died on 30 November 2013, aged 84. He was educated at Rugby School and, after national service in the army, Corpus Christi College, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence, graduating in 1953. The same year he joined the family firm, Paterson Zochonis, becoming a director in 1957 and chairman from 1970 to 1993, overseeing its successful diversification from its original West African trading interests to toiletries and pharmaceuticals. In 1977 he founded the Zochonis Charitable Trust, and through both this and numerous low-key personal donations he was a very significant philanthropist in Manchester and the North-West. He was knighted in 1997. He was survived by his wife Brigid.

Lord Kingsdown

5 January 1927 – 24 November 2013

Robert (Robin) Leigh-Pemberton, Baron Kingsdown KG, PC, Governor of the Bank of England from 1983 to 1993, died on 24 November 2013, aged 86. Born in Sittingbourne, Kent, into a wealthy farming family, he was educated at Eton and, after service with the Grenadier Guards, Trinity College, Oxford, where he took the war-shortened course in Literae Humaniores, graduating in 1950. He was called to the bar by the Inner Temple in 1954 and practised until 1960. After a spell managing the family estate he entered business, qualifying as an accountant in 1965 and soon acquiring a host of directorships. He was chairman of Birmid Qualcast from 1975 to 1977 and of the National Westminster Bank from 1977 to 1983. He was a Conservative member of Kent County Council from 1961 to 1977. After retiring as Governor of the Bank of England he was made a life peer and for five years was a director of Hambros. He was survived by his wife Rosemary and four sons, one son having predeceased him.

The Earl of Dudley

5 January 1920 – 16 November 2013

William Humble David Ward, fourth Earl of Derby, landowner and businessman, died on 16 November 2013, aged 93. The son of the third earl, he was educated at Eton and (as Viscount Ednam) Christ Church, Oxford. His undergraduate career was interrupted by the Second World War, during which he served with the 10th Hussars, including a spell as aide-de-camp to Lord Wavell, the Viceroy of India, and then on active service in Italy, where he was wounded. Alongside a successful business career as a director of numerous companies, he was an enthusiastic actor and satirist. He succeeded his father in 1969 and sat as a Conservative. He had three children with his first wife, Stella (daughter of the Argentine Ambassador in London) and six with his second, the actress Maureen Swanson. She died in 2011.

Anne Barton

9 May 1933 – 11 November 2013

(Barbara) Anne Barton (née Roesen) FBA, literary scholar, died on 11 November 2013, aged 80. Born in New York, she was educated at Bryn Mawr College, graduating in 1954, and went on to take a PhD at Cambridge in 1960. She was Rosalind Lady Carlisle Research Fellow at Girton College from 1960 to 1962, and an official fellow from then until 1972. After two years as Hildred Carlisle Professor of English at Bedford College, London, in 1974 she became tutor in English and the first female fellow of New College, Oxford. In 1984 she returned to Cambridge as Professor of English. She was known especially for her work on Shakespeare – notably her first book, Shakespeare and the Idea of the Play (1962) – but also for that on Ben Jonson, Byron, and John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester. She was survived by her second husband, John Barton, a co-founder of the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Sir John Whitehead

20 September 1932 – 8 November 2013

Sir John Stainton Whitehead GCMG, CVO, diplomat, died on 8 November 2013, aged 81. He was educated at Christ’s Hospital and, after national service in the army, Hertford College, Oxford, where he read German and French, graduating in 1955. He joined the Diplomatic Service the same year. Although he served in Washington, Bonn and London, he became a specialist in Japan, and served there in 1956-61, 1968-71, and 1980-4 before becoming ambassador there for an unprecedented six-year stint from 1986 to 1992. After retiring from the Diplomatic Service he was involved with a number of businesses and cultural organisations, particularly associated with Japan, and he was chairman of the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation from 2008 to 2012. He was elected an honorary fellow of Hertford College in 1991. He was survived by his wife Carolyn and their four children.

Patrick Daunt

19 February 1925 – 6 November 2013

Patrick Eldon Daunt, educationist, died on 6 November 2013, aged 88. Born in Hastings, the son of a doctor, he was educated at Rugby School and, after service in the navy, Wadham College, Oxford, where he read Literae Humaniores, graduating in 1948. He taught classics at the University of Sydney, but gave it up in order to go ‘walkabout’ around Australia for two years. On his return he was for twelve years a teacher at Christ’s Hospital School, Horsham, before becoming headmaster of a comprehensive, Thomas Bennett School in Crawley. He became a leading advocate for comprehensives and his book Comprehensive Values (1975) was widely cited. In 1973 he left Thomas Bennett to work as an administrator and consultant for the EEC and subsequently also for UNESCO and various other international organisations, specialising in disability as well as education issues. He was survived by his wife Jean and their four children.

Grigor McClelland

2 January 1922 – 6 November 2013

(William) Grigor McClelland CBE, businessman, philanthropist, and management scholar, died on 6 November 2013, aged 91. Born in Gosforth into a Quaker family, he was educated at Leighton Park School and, after service with the Friends’ Ambulance Unit, Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1948. He then joined the family grocery firm, Laws Stores, becoming managing director from 1949 to 1965, and chairman thereafter. In 1962 he returned to Balliol, as a research fellow in management studies, and in 1963 was founding editor of the Journal of Management Studies. From 1965 to 1977 he was the founding director of Manchester Business School. In 1977 he returned to Laws as managing director, until the sale of the business in 1985. He was a noted philanthropist in the North-East and a member of numerous charitable and educational organisations. In 2003 he returned his CBE in protest at the Iraq war, but reclaimed it in 2009 when British troops were withdrawn. He was survived by his second wife, Caroline, three stepchildren, and the four children of his first marriage.

Harry Holcroft

2 May 1951 – 3 November 2013

Major Harry St John Holcroft, soldier and artist, died on 3 November 2013, aged 62. Born in Birmingham, he was educated at Downside School and Hertford College, Oxford, where he also studied art at the Ruskin School of Drawing. He spent 23 years in the Household Cavalry, serving in Cyprus, Northern Ireland and Germany, before being invalided out. He thereupon chose to paint full-time, travelling to many distant corners of the globe. He was especially well known for his watercolours (painted in situ) of tropical rainforests. He published several books of illustrations accompanied by text, including The Silk Route (1999), The Spice Route (2000), and, with Sir Ghillean Prance, Rainforest Light and Spirit (2009). He was survived by his wife Sarah, their two sons, and two daughters from a previous marriage.

Andro Linklater

10 December 1944 – 3 November 2013

Andro Ian Robert Linklater, journalist and author, died on 3 November 2013, aged 68. Born in Edinburgh, the son of the novelist Eric Linklater (and the brother of the journalist Magnus Linklater), he was educated at Winchester College and New College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. After a varied succession of jobs – including working as a tutor in France, an assistant in an art gallery in San Francisco, an administrator for the Liberal Party, and a teacher in west London – he took up writing after completing the history of the Black Watch left unfinished on his father’s death. He subsequently wrote prolifically, as a journalist for the Telegraph Weekend Magazine, a book reviewer for the Spectator, and author of books ranging from children’s stories to biographies and Measuring America (2003), which looked at the influence of surveyors and surveying in American history. He was working on a book on the Scottish islands when he died. He was survived by his wife Marie-Louise.

John Hughes

28 January 1927 – 1 November 2013

John Hughes, economist and Principal of Ruskin College, Oxford, from 1979 to 1989, died on 1 November 2013, aged 86. He was educated at Westminster City School, and Lincoln College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1948. After a short spell with the international youth brigade in Yugoslavia and national service in the Educational Corps he began his career in adult education as an extramural tutor for the universities of Hull and Sheffield. In 1957 he joined the staff of Ruskin College, becoming Vice-Principal in 1970. He wrote many Fabian pamphlets and several books, on trade unions and workers’ control, and later on the European Social Charter. He was survived by his four daughters, his wife Vi (also a tutor at Ruskin) having predeceased him by two weeks.

Basil Hennessy

10 February 1925 – 27 October 2013

(John) Basil Hennessy AO, archaeologist, died on 27 October 2013, aged 88. He was born in Horsham, Victoria, Australia, and went to school in Ballarat. In 1942 he joined the Royal Australian Navy, serving mainly in Papua New Guinea and at a radar station near Darwin. In 1947 he went with an ex-serviceman’s scholarship to the University of Sydney, graduating in Archaeology in 1950 and (after fieldwork at Jericho) becoming a lecturer in 1954. From 1962 to 1965 he studied for a DPhil at Oxford, on ‘The Foreign Relations of Palestine during the Early Bronze Age’. After a spell as director of the British School of Archaeology in Jerusalem (1966-70) he returned to the University of Sydney, where he was Professor of Archaeology until his retirement in 1990. He was a leading authority on the Bronze Age archaeology of the Near East. He was survived by his wife Ruth and their three children.

Nigel Davenport

23 May 1928 – 25 October 2013

The actor (Arthur) Nigel Davenport died on 25 October 2013, aged 85. Brought up in Cambridgeshire, the son of the bursar of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, he was educated at Cheltenham College and Trinity College, Oxford, where he read English, graduating in 1951, and performed with OUDS. He began his professional career immediately after graduating and was a founder member of the English Stage Company at the Royal Court Theatre, and appeared as Peter in the first production of Shelagh Delaney’s A Taste of Honey (1959). He worked prolifically on film, television, and radio, including major roles in Howard’s Way (1987-8 and 1990) and Trainer (1991). He was president of Equity from 1986 to 1992. He was survived by three children from his two marriages, both of which ended in divorce.

Terry Hughes

15 May 1964 – 24 October 2013

Terry Hughes, corporate financier, died on 24 October 2013, aged 49. Born in Dublin, he was educated at St Mary’s School, Crosby, Liverpool, and Hertford College, Oxford, where he read Physics. He joined the Continental Bank as a trainee in 1987, subsequently working for UBS, Goldman Sachs, Silver Point Capital, and Hutton Collins; he was an influential figure in the new field of debt finance, enabling the growth of management buyouts and private equity firms. A discerning collector of art and antiquities, and a generous philanthropist, he was a life patron of the National Portrait Gallery, and a member of Oxford University’s Court of Benefactors. He was survived by his wife, Maria, and their three children.

Joe McPartlin

12 June 1938 – 24 October 2013

Joseph James (Joe) McPartlin, teacher and rugby player, died on 24 October 2013, aged 75. Born in West Hartlepool, he was educated at Wimbledon College and, after national service in the army, St Edmund Hall, Oxford, where he read Geography, graduating in 1962 and then going on to take a diploma in education. A talented rugby player, he played for Scotland in 1960 and again in 1962, and won Blues three years in succession (captaining the Oxford team in 1962). He taught for many years at St Edward’s School, Oxford, meanwhile playing for Harlequins and for various county sides; after retiring from playing, he refereed local rugby matches. He was also involved in Oxford rugby for more than fifty years, becoming fixture secretary in 1975 and remaining a committee member at the time of his death.

Lawrence Klein

14 September 1920 – 20 October 2013

The Nobel prize-winning economist Lawrence Robert Klein died on 20 October 2013, aged 93. Born in Omaha, Nebraska, he attended Los Angeles City College, the University of California, Berkeley, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he worked with Paul Samuelson. He then taught at Chicago and Michigan, but his application for tenure was blocked on account of his earlier flirtation with communism and, a victim of McCarthyism, he moved to Oxford University’s Institute of Statistics, where between 1954 and 1958 he worked closely with Sir James Ball developing the ‘Oxford model’ of how the British economy worked. In 1958 he returned to the US to become a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where he remained until his retirement in 1991. He was best known for his work on economic modelling, and his contributions to Keynesian theory. He won the Nobel prize for economics in 1980, was made a corresponding FBA in 1991, and became an honorary fellow of Jesus College, Oxford, in 2005. He was survived by his wife Sonia and their four children.

Norman Geras

25 August 1943 – 18 October 2013

The political philosopher Norman Geras died on 18 October 2013, aged 70. Born in Bulawayo, Southern Rhodesia, he was educated there and at Pembroke College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1965. After two years at Nuffield College he joined the Department of Government at the University of Manchester, where he remained until his retirement in 2003, latterly as Professor of Politics. He wrote several books on different aspects of Marxist theory and history. After retirement he reached a wider audience as a blogger, and also for his arguments in favour of international intervention to promote democracy and human rights. He was survived by his wife, the writer Adèle Geras, and their two daughters.

Keith Panter-Brick

29 September 1920 – 18 October 2013

Keith Panter-Brick, international relations scholar, died on 18 October 2013, aged 93. He was educated at Wallasey Grammar School, leaving to take an office job and join the Territorial Army. Mobilised in 1939, he served with the second battalion of the Cheshire Regiment in eastern France before being captured, spending the rest of the war as a prisoner in various labour camps (an experience he wrote about in Years Not Wasted, published in 1999). On liberation he obtained a place at Keble College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1948. In 1950 he joined the staff of the London School of Economics, where he remained until 1985, latterly as a professor. His research and publications focused on decolonisation and the post-independence politics of Africa, especially Nigeria and French West Africa. He was survived by four children, his wife Simone having predeceased him.

Nick Baile

4 June 1932 – 9 October 2013

The wine merchant Nicholas Bernard (Nick) Baile died on 9 October 2013, aged 81. The son of an industrial chemist, he read Agriculture at University College, Oxford, graduating in 1954. After national service he started work with Unwins, moving on to Harveys of Bristol, where he became a Master of Wine, then International Distillers and Vintners, helping expand the Peter Dominic wine chain to 380 outlets. In 1973 he bought the Oddbins chain from the receiver after its founder, Ahmed Pochee, had been forced to put it into liquidation. He expanded the chain to 60 outlets before selling the business in 1984 to Seagram. He was subsequently less successful with a smaller chain, John Barnett. He was survived by four children, his marriage having ended in divorce.

Charles Black

4 May 1937 – 9 October 2013

The publisher Charles Archibald Adam Black died on 9 October 2013, aged 76. He was educated at Winchester College, followed by Christ Church, Oxford, where he read Modern History, captained the university’s real tennis team, and graduated in 1960. After national service in the Scots Guards he went on to Harvard Business School. He then joined the family firm, A & C Black, founded by his great-great-grandfather, and most famous as publishers of Who’s Who and other reference works. He succeeded his father as chairman in 1973. On his retirement in 2000 he oversaw the sale of the company to Bloomsbury for a reported £16.4 million. He was made a non-executive director of Bloomsbury. A keen sportsman, he was captain of the Royal St George’s Golf Club in Sandwich. He was survived by his wife Melanie, daughter of the businessman Sir Denys Lowson, and by their two children.

Lord Kindersley

18 August 1929 – 9 October 2013

Robert Hugh Molesworth (Hugo) Kindersley, third Baron Kindersley, DL, merchant banker, died on 9 October 2013, aged 84. The son of the second Baron Kindersley, he was born in London and educated at Eton and, following national service with the Scots Guards in Malaya, Trinity College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics (graduating in 1952), followed by Harvard, where he took an MBA. A director of Lazard Brothers from 1960 to 1990, he was also a director of numerous other companies, including London Assurance, Witan Investment, the Steel Company of Wales, Marconi, Sun Alliance, English Electric, and Maersk. From 1980 to 1989 he was chairman of the Commonwealth Development Corporation, and in 1991-2 he was chairman of Brent Walker, at the point when it collapsed. He succeeded his father in 1976, but did not seek election to the reformed House of Lords. He was survived by his second wife, Patricia, and by three of the four children of his first marriage.

Jim Birley

31 May 1928 – 6 October 2013

James Latham Tennant (Jim) Birley CBE, FRCP, FRCPsych, psychiatrist, died on 6 October 2013, aged 85. The son of a neurologist, he was educated at Winchester College and University College, Oxford, then completed his clinical training at St Thomas’ Hospital, London. He took his Oxford BM in 1952. After national service in the Royal Army Medical Corps, various junior medical posts, and a year working for William Sargant, he joined the MRC’s social psychiatry research unit at the Maudsley Hospital in London, where he was a consultant psychiatrist from 1969 to 1990. He was widely known within the psychiatric profession for a classic paper published in 1968, which showed the role of stressful life events in the onset of schizophrenia, and for his advocacy of care in the community. He was president of the Royal College of Psychiatry from 1987 to 1990 and of the British Medical Association in 1993-4. He founded the Camberwell Rehab Association and the Southwark Association for Mental Health. He was survived by his wife Julia and their four children.

Alan Brooke Turner

4 January 1926 – 5 October 2013/span>

Alan Brooke Turner CMG, diplomat, died on 5 October 2013, aged 87. He was educated at Marlborough College and, after service in the RAF, Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Literae Humaniores, graduating in 1951. He joined the Foreign Service the same year. Although his postings included Jedda, Lisbon, Rio de Janeiro and Rome, he was particularly known as an expert on Russia and central Europe. His final posting was as Ambassador to Finland, from 1983 to 1985. He then served for eight years as Director of the Great Britain/East Europe Centre (subsequently the British Association for Central and Eastern Europe). He was survived by his wife Hazel and their four children.

Hugh Jackson

9 May 1918 – 5 October 2013

The paediatrician (Robert) Hugh Jackson OBE, MC, died on 5 October 2013, aged 95. Born in Oldham into a medical family, he was educated at Oundle, and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read Physiology, graduating in 1939, and completing his clinical training in Oxford. During the war he worked at the Radcliffe Infirmary and the Wingfield Orthopaedic Hospital before service in the Royal Army Medical Corps, much of it on the frontline. After the war he worked with Sir James Spence in Newcastle, and became a consultant paediatrician in North Shields, Gateshead, and Newcastle. He became a pioneering campaigner for child safety, and his study of children admitted for poisoning led to the introduction of child-resistant packaging of medicines. Later, with Donald Court, he persuaded the King’s Fund to finance the Child Accident Prevention Trust, whose reports led to many steps to reduce injury in children. He was also an adviser to the World Health Organisation. He was survived by two sons, his wife and one son having predeceased him.

Joan Thirsk

19 June 1922 – 3 October 2013

(Irene) Joan Thirsk (née Watkins) CBE, FBA, Reader in Economic History in the University of Oxford and Professorial Fellow of St Hilda’s College from 1965 to 1983, died on 3 October 2013, aged 91. Born in London, she was educated at Camden School for Girls and Westfield College, London, where she initially read modern languages. Her undergraduate education was interrupted by service at Bletchley Park during the Second World War. In 1945 she married Jimmy Thirsk, a librarian. Returning to Westfield College, she switched to history, graduating in that subject then completing a PhD on English agrarian history under the supervision of R. H. Tawney at the London School of Economics. For fourteen years she was a research fellow at the University of Leicester before succeeding W. G. Hoskins at Oxford. She wrote widely on all aspects of English agricultural and rural history. She was perhaps best known as general editor of the eight-volume Agrarian History of England and Wales, finally completed in 2001. She was elected an FBA in 1974 and made a CBE in 1994; she was survived by her husband and their two children.

Sir Godfray Le Quesne

18 January 1924 – 2 October 2013

Sir (John) Godfray Le Quesne QC, Chairman of the Monopolies and Mergers Commission from 1975 to 1987, died on 2 October 2013, aged 89. From an old Jersey family, he was educated at Shrewsbury School and Exeter College, Oxford, where he read first Literae Humaniores, graduating in 1945, then Jurisprudence, taking his second degree in 1946. He achieved the unusual distinction of becoming President of the Oxford Union early in his undergraduate career, in 1943. He was called to the bar by the Inner Temple in 1947, and took silk in 1962. A highly-regarded authority on the law of the Channel Islands, he was a founding member of the Courts of Appeal of Jersey from 1964 to 1997 and of Guernsey from 1964 to 1995. He was chairman of the council of Regent’s Park College, Oxford, from 1958 to 1987. He and his wife Susan had two sons and a daughter.

Olive Stevenson

13 December 1930 – 30 September 2013

Olive Stevenson CBE, social scientist and child welfare specialist, died on 30 September 2013, aged 82. Born in Croydon, of Irish descent, she was educated at Purley County Grammar School for Girls, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford (where she read English, graduating in 1952), and the London School of Economics, where she took diplomas in social studies and child care. After a stint as child care officer for Devon County Council and two years teaching at the University of Bristol, she was a lecturer, and subsequently reader, in applied social studies at Oxford from 1961 to 1976. She was elected a fellow of St Anne’s College in 1970. She was then a professor of social studies at the universities of Keele (1976-82), Liverpool (1983-4) and Nottingham (1984-94). Her academic research concentrated on child abuse and child welfare, and she sat on numerous government committees. She was made a CBE in 1994. She was unmarried but was survived by two nieces and a nephew, to whom she was close.

Carl Joachim Classen

15 August 1928 – 29 September 2013

Carl Joachim Classen, classicist, died on 29 September 2013, aged 85. After taking degrees in classics from the universities of Göttingen and Hamburg, he went on to Magdalen College, Oxford, taking his BLitt in 1956. He taught at the universities of Ibadan and Göttingen, the Berlin Institute of Technology, and the University of Würzburg, before returning to the University of Göttingen as professor in 1973. An internationally recognised scholar of Roman literature and the history of classical scholarship, he was a visiting fellow at All Souls College, Oxford (1980) and Merton College (1995). He was survived by his wife Roswitha and their three sons.

Michael Sullivan

29 October 1916 – 28 September 2013

(Donovan) Michael Sullivan, scholar and collector of Chinese art and benefactor, died on 28 September 2013, aged 96. Born in Toronto, the son of Alan Sullivan (the novelist Sinclair Murray), he was educated at Rugby School, and Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, where he read architecture. A conscientious objector, in 1940 he went with the International Red Cross to China, where for two years he drove supplying medical supplies to cities under bombardment for the Japanese, before taking a post with the West China Union University. In 1946 he returned with his Chinese wife Khoan to England to enrol at SOAS; he then went to Harvard University, where he took his PhD. He worked as a curator and lecturer at the University of Malaya in Singapore then a lecturer in Asian art at SOAS before becoming professor of oriental art then Christensen Professor at Stanford University, from 1966 to 1985. He was Slade Professor of Fine Art at Oxford in 1973-4, a visiting fellow at St Antony’s College in 1976-7, and a fellow of St Catherine’s College from 1979. A renowned scholar especially of twentieth-century Chinese art, he began collecting Chinese art in the 1940s, and his benefactions to the Ashmolean Museum led to the opening of the Khoan and Michael Sullivan Gallery in 2000. The museum presented him with a festschrift, A Life in Chinese Art, in 2012. He was predeceased by Khoan.

David Winfield

p>2 December 1929 – 28 September 2013

David Crampton Winfield MBE, art historian and archaeologist, died on 28 September 2013, aged 83. Born in London, the son of a civil servant, he was educated at Bryanston School and, after national service, Merton College, Oxford, where he read Modern History, graduating in 1954. He then came under the spell of the Byzantine art historian David Talbot Rice, and devoted his subsequent career to the exploration and restoration of Roman and Byzantine remains in Turkey, Cyprus, and the surrounding region; he was particularly noted as a restorer of early medieval wall paintings. In 1973 he took up a visiting fellowship at All Souls, followed by a senior research fellowship at Merton. Subsequently he returned to conservancy work, first at Canterbury Cathedral and then for the National Trust. On retirement he and his wife June took up farming on the Isle of Mull. He was survived by her and their three children.

John Herbert

24 May 1924 – 27 September 2013

The journalist and public relations executive John Selwyn Herbert died on 27 September 2013, aged 89. Born in Hammersmith, the son of the author, humorist and MP for Oxford University, Sir Alan (A.P.) Herbert, he followed his father to Winchester College and – after war service in the navy – New College, Oxford. He spent ten years as a journalist, mostly with the Daily Telegraph, before moving into public relations. In 1958 he was recruited to open a press office for Christie’s, the auctioneers; he retired as director of public relations in 1985. In 1990 he published a revealing account of his years with the firm, Inside Christie’s. A keen sailor, he wrote the centenary history of the London Corinthian Sailing Club in 1994. He was survived by two sons and a step-daughter.

D. Ellis Evans

23 September 1930 – 26 September 2013

David Ellis Evans FBA, Celtic scholar and Jesus Professor of Celtic at the University of Oxford from 1978 to 1996, died on 26 September 2013, aged 83. Born in Carmarthenshire, he was educated at Llandeilo Grammar School, the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth, University College, Swansea, and, as a Meyricke graduate scholar, Jesus College, Oxford. He completed his DPhil in 1962, on early Celtic personal names. He meanwhile taught at University College, Swansea, from 1957, becoming Professor of Welsh Language and Literature and head of the department in 1974. He published prolifically on the culture of the early continental Celts, and the history, literature and culture of the Celts in Wales and Ireland, and held offices in numerous scholarly, educational and cultural organisations. He was elected an FBA in 1983 and was chairman of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages in 1985-6. He was survived by two daughters, his wife Sheila having predeceased him.

Robert Barnard

23 November 1936 – 20 September 2013

The author Robert Barnard died on 20 September 2013, aged 76. Born in Burnham-on-Crouch, Essex, he was educated at the Royal Grammar School, Colchester, and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read English, graduating in 1959. He stayed on as a graduate, but left before completing a further degree, though he later published his research as Imagery and Theme in the Novels of Charles Dickens (1974). Meanwhile he had embarked on parallel careers as a university lecturer in English – teaching at the University of New England in Armidale, New South Wales, and the universities of Bergen, where he completed his PhD, and Tromsø, where he became a professor – and as a prolific writer of detective novels and historical crime stories, which, featuring various recognisably ‘English’ characters, sold particularly well in the United States. He was survived by his wife Louise.

Edward Olleson

1 April 1937 – 20 September 2013

The musicologist (Donald) Edward Olleson died on 20 September 2013, aged 76. Born in South Shields, the son of an accountant, he was a chorister at Peterborough Cathedral before going on to Oundle School and then Hertford College, Oxford, where he was an organ scholar and read Music, graduating in 1959. After a brief spell as a music lecturer in Hull he returned to Oxford in 1963 as a research lecturer at Christ Church. He became a fellow of Merton College in 1970 and was a university lecturer in music from 1972 to 2001. He contributed articles to a wide range of specialist periodicals, was for ten years a co-editor of the journal Music and Letters, and was author of the volume on Haydn in the Oxford Composer Companions series. For many years he was the conductor of the Oxford University Orchestra. He was survived by his wife Eileen and their three children.

Richard Scott Simon

28 January 1932 – 20 September 2013

Richard Scott Simon, literary agent, died on 20 September 2013, aged 81. The great-grandson of George Gilbert Scott, the architect, he was educated privately and in Switzerland. He did his national service in the Educational Corps then went to St John’s College, Oxford, where he read Modern History, graduating in 1954. A short spell at the publisher William Collins was followed by a much longer one at Curtis Brown, where he was agent for, among others, Christopher Isherwood, Ivy Compton-Bennett, Patrick O’Brian, Rose Tremain and Tom Sharpe. In 1971 he formed his own agency, Richard Scott Simon Ltd, where he built an equally formidable list. He lived for many years in Scotland, latterly in Edinburgh. A discerning collector of contemporary art, he left a bronze by Henri Gaudier-Brzeska to St John’s College. He was survived by his eldest brother, Oliver, and nine nephews and nieces.

Air Marshal Sir John Curtiss

6 December 1924 – 14 September 2013

Air Marshal Sir John Bagot Curtiss KCB, KBE, FRAeS, died on 14 September 2013, aged 88. He was educated at Radley College, Wanganui Collegiate School in New Zealand, and Worcester College, Oxford, though he left without taking a degree. Having trained with the Oxford University Air Squadron, he joined the RAF in 1943, serving as a navigator with Bomber Command, and flying on bombing raids over north-west Europe. After the war he was offered a permanent commission. He took part in the Berlin airlift, and rose steadily through the ranks, eventually becoming air officer commanding No 18 Group (the former Coastal Command) and overseeing air operations during the Falklands War. After retirement in 1983 he was involved in many charitable activities, as well as serving as a director and for three years chief executive of the Society of British Aerospace Companies. He was appointed CB in 1979, KCB in 1981, and KBE in 1982. He was survived by his wife Peggy and their four children.

William Bell

31 December 1919 – 12 September 2013

William Bell CMG, MBE, colonial administrator, civil servant, and Information Officer for the University of Oxford from 1977 to 1984, died on 12 September 2013, aged 93. Born in Hull, the son of a classics master, he was educated at Hymers College, Hull, and Oriel College, Oxford. He left before taking classical moderations to enlist in the Gloucestershire Regiment, serving from 1940 to 1946 and taking part in the D-Day landings. Demobilised in 1946 with an MBE and the rank of major, he joined the colonial administrative service in Uganda, becoming permanent secretary of the Ministry of Social Services, and also chairman of Uganda National Parks and president of the Uganda Sports Union. Following independence he worked for the Overseas Development Administration, as UK director of the Caribbean Development Bank, and as founding director-general of the Technical Education and Training Organisation for Overseas Countries, before taking up his post with the University of Oxford. He was survived by his two children, his wife, Margaret, having predeceased him.

Brian MacDermot

2 December 1930 – 12 September 2013

Brian Hugh MacDermot, stockbroker and art dealer, died on 12 September 2013, aged 82. Born in Paris, the son of Frank MacDermot, a senator in the Irish Dáil, he was educated in the United States, and at Downside and New College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. After graduating in 1952 he joined the Irish Guards, then worked as a stockbroker with Cazenove then Panmure Gordon, meanwhile undertaking frequent trips to Africa; his field research among the Nuer pastoralists of the Nile Valley resulted in his book, The Cult of the Sacred Spear (1972). He was later a founder and active supporter of the Southern Sudan Association. In 1975 he left stockbroking to found the Mathaf Gallery, specialising in Orientalist paintings. He was a vice-president of the Royal Anthropological Institute and a council member of the Royal Geographical Society. He was survived by his wife Gina and their two children.

Sir David Hancock

27 March 1934 – 5 September 2013

Sir David Hancock KCB, Permanent Secretary of the Department of Education and Science from 1983 to 1989, died on 5 September 2013, aged 79. Born in Beckenham, Kent, he was educated at Whitgift School, Croydon, and, after national service in the Royal Tank Regiment, Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics. After graduating in 1957 he joined the Board of Trade, but in 1959 he was recruited to the Treasury. He was private secretary to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Roy Jenkins, in 1968-70, and later head of the European Secretariat, helping to resolve the dispute over Britain’s budget contributions. He was Deputy Secretary at the Treasury from 1980 to 1982 and then at the Cabinet Office from 1982 to 1983. After taking early retirement he worked as an investment banker; he was also active in many charitable organisations. He was made a KCB in 1985. He was survived by his wife Gill and their two children.

Dame Juliet Wheldon

26 March 1950 – 2 September 2013

Dame Juliet Louise Wheldon DCB, Hon QC, Treasury Solicitor and head of the Government Legal Service from 2000 to 2006, died on 2 September 2013, aged 63. She was educated at Sherborne School for Girls and Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, where she read Modern History, graduating in 1971. After a law conversion course she was called to the bar by Gray’s Inn in 1975. In 1976 she joined the Treasury Solicitor’s Department. From 1989 to 1997 she was Legal Secretary to the Law Officers, advising on many contentious issues. She was the first woman to become Treasury Solicitor, in which role she was a reforming head of the Government Legal Service. From 2006 to 2008 she was chief legal adviser to the Governor of the Bank of England, and from 2009 to 2011 she was a member of the National Security Forum and the Advisory Committee on Business Appointments. She was made a CB in 1994 and DCB in 2004. She was unmarried.

Alan Carrington

6 January 1934 – 31 August 2013

The chemist Alan Carrington CBE, FRS, Royal Society Research Professor at the University of Oxford and fellow of Jesus College from 1984 to 1987, died on 31 August 2013, aged 79. Educated at Colfe’s Grammar School and the University of Southampton, where he also took his PhD, he became a fellow of Downing College, Cambridge, in 1960, working with the renowned theoretical chemist Christopher Longuet-Higgins. In 1967 he moved to the University of Southampton, where he became Professor of Chemistry in 1967, then Royal Society Research Professor from 1979 to 1984 and again from 1987 to 1999. He made fundamental contributions to the understanding of the structure of molecules, particularly through the use of spectroscopy. He was elected an FRS in 1971 and received the Faraday Medal in 1985 and the Davy Medal in 1992. He was a keen sportsman and an accomplished pianist. He was survived by his wife, Noreen, and their three children, two of them professional musicians.

Seamus Heaney

13 April 1939 – 30 August 2013

The poet Seamus Heaney FBA, Professor of Poetry at Oxford from 1989 to 1994 and winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995, died on 30 August 2013, aged 74. The son of a farmer in County Derry, Northern Ireland, and from a Roman Catholic family, he was educated at St Columb’s College, Derry, and Queen’s University, Belfast. After graduating in 1961 he taught first at a secondary school, then at a college of education, then at Queen’s University, Belfast; he later taught at Carysfort College, and from 1985 to 1997 at Harvard (where he spent nine further years as Ralph Waldo Emerson Poet in Residence). His first substantial collection of poems, Death of Naturalist (1966), won both the Somerset Maugham and the Cholmondeley awards. In all he published thirteen collections of poetry (winning numerous prizes, including the Whitbread Prize three times), several volumes of essays, and an acclaimed translation of Beowulf (1999). He was awarded an honorary DLitt by Oxford University in 1997 and elected FBA in 1999. He was survived by his wife Marie and their three children.

Margaret Davies-Mitchell

4 May 1923 – 25 August 2013

The French scholar Margaret Constance Davies-Mitchell (née Brown), Lady Mitchell, died on 25 August 2013, aged 90. Brought up by her mother, a primary school headteacher, after her father’s early death, she was educated at Queen Mary School, Lytham St Annes, and Somerville College, Oxford, where she read French and German, graduating in 1944. Soon after graduation she married Robert Davies, a fellow student and later businessman. Immediately after the war she moved to France, and took a doctorate at the Sorbonne in 1948 for a thesis on Apollinaire. She taught at Westfield College, University of London, and the University of Reading, where she became a professor and met her second husband, the distinguished physicist Sir William Mitchell. She was renowned as an expert on French modernist poetry, and was made a Chevalier dans l’ordre des Palmes Académiques in 1993 and an honorary fellow of Somerville College in 1999. She was survived by two children and a stepson, her husband having predeceased her.

Rt Rev Roy Davies

31 January 1934 – 7 August 2013

The Rt Rev Roy Thomas Davies, Bishop of Llandaff from 1985 to 1999, died on 7 August 2013, aged 79. Born in Llangennech, Carmarthenshire, the son of a factory worker, he was educated at Llanelli Boys’ Grammar School and St David’s College, Lampeter, where he took a degree in Welsh. He then went to Jesus College, Oxford, where he took a BLitt in 1959, meanwhile also training for the priesthood at St Stephen’s House. He spent his entire ministry within the Anglican Church in Wales, including six years (1967-73) as chaplain to the Anglican students at the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth, and another six as secretary to the Church’s Provincial Council for Mission and Unity. Before becoming Bishop of Llandaff he was vicar of St David’s, Carmarthen, and then of Llanegwad. He was unmarried.

Elisabeth Maxwell

11 March 1921 – 7 August 2013

Elisabeth Maxwell, née Meynard, historical researcher, and widow of the media tycoon Robert Maxwell, died on 7 August 2013, aged 92. Born in Dauphiné, France, she met her future husband when she was working as an interpreter for the Welcome Committee in Paris (arranging meetings between Allied officers and French families) soon after the Liberation. They married in 1945. After bringing up their nine children (two of whom died young), she matriculated as a mature student at St Hugh’s College, where she read Modern Languages followed, in 1981, by a DPhil on the art of letter writing in France in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries (focusing on a Protestant circle in Lyons). She also involved herself in good causes, especially those connected with Holocaust remembrance, and the promotion of better relations between Christians and Jews. She was, however, increasingly estranged from her husband. After his death in mysterious circumstances and the unravelling of his fraudulent activities, she published an autobiography, A Mind of My Own (1994). She was survived by seven children.

John Billingham

18 March 1930 – 4 August 2013

John Billingham, biotechnologist and astrobiologist, died on 4 August 2013, aged 83. Born in Worcester, he was educated at the Royal Grammar School there and at University College, Oxford, where he graduated in Physiology in 1950. He qualified as a doctor at Guy’s Hospital, London, taking his Oxford BM in 1954. He spent nine years in the RAF as a medical officer before joining Nasa’s Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston as head of the environmental physiology department. In 1965 he was transferred to Nasa’s Ames Research Center in California, where he became increasingly preoccupied with the search for extraterrestrial life by means of giant radio telescopes. From 1992 to 1995 he was the founding director of SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), which he continued to support after his retirement. He was survived by two sons, his wife Margaret having predeceased him.

Dominick Harrod

21 August 1940 – 4 August 2013

The journalist Dominick Roy Harrod died on 4 August 2013, aged 72. Born in Oxford, the son of the economist Sir Roy Harrod, he was educated at Westminster School and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics and coxed for the college rowing crew. After graduating in 1962 he joined the Sunday Telegraph. In 1966 he joined the Daily Telegraph, first as Washington correspondent and then as economics correspondent. In 1971 he joined the BBC, becoming economics editor from 1979 to 1993. He published The Politics of Economics in 1978, and Making Sense of the Economy in 1983. From 1994 to 1998 he was programme director of St George’s House, Windsor Castle, and simultaneously President of the Institute of Journalists. He was survived by a son and two stepsons, his wife Christina having predeceased him.

Bill Hoskyns

19 March 1931 – 4 August 2013

Henry William Furse (Bill) Hoskyns, fencer and farmer, died on 4 August 2013, aged 82. Born in London but brought up in Somerset, he was educated at Eton and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read Agriculture but spent more time playing bridge and fencing than studying; in 1952 he became British foil and epée champion. On graduating in 1953 he returned to Somerset to help run the family estate (which he inherited in 1974), meanwhile pursuing his career as a fencer. In all he won 21 British championship medals and eight titles. In 1958 he became the first Briton to win a world fencing title when he took gold in epée in Philadelphia. He represented Great Britain at six consecutive Olympic Games, winning a team silver in Rome in 1960 and an individual silver in Tokyo in 1964. He was later vice-president of British Fencing. He was survived by his wife Georgina and their five children.

Alun Hughes

15 July 1921 – 1 August 2013

(Henry Goronwy) Alun Hughes, linguist and librarian, died on 1 August 2013, aged 92. Born in Ponlottyn, Glamorgan, the son of a Baptist minister, he was educated at Pontypridd County School for Boys. After serving on the Republican side in the Spanish Civil War he went to Jesus College, Oxford, where he read Modern Languages. During the Second World War he joined the Merchant Navy, twice surviving being torpedoed and sunk. Returning to Oxford after the war, he graduated in Spanish in 1946. For six years he lectured in linguistics at the School of Oriental and African Studies, London, during which time he conducted extensive research on the languages of Micronesia and Polynesia. He subsequently worked as a librarian and later as a solicitor, but he also held visiting professorships in linguistics behind the Iron Curtain. He was a committed Communist, and for some years secretary of the Communist Party of Wales. He was survived by two stepsons of his second marriage, his third wife, Zuzana, having predeceased him.

Godfrey Stafford

15 April 1920 – 29 July 2013

Godfrey Harry Stafford CBE, FRS, physicist and Master of St Cross College, Oxford, from 1979 to 1987, died on 29 July 2013, aged 93. He was born in England but moved to South Africa with his family when he was eight. He was educated at Rondebosch Boys’ High School, the University of Cape Town, and, after war service with the South African Naval Forces and the Admiralty Research Establishment, Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, where he took hi PhD in 1950. He worked at Harwell and the South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research in Pretoria before joining the Rutherford Laboratory, initially as head of the proton linear accelerator group and eventually (from 1969 to 1979) as director. He was a president of the European Physical Society and of the Institute of Physics, and was appointed CBE in 1976 and elected FRS in 1979. He lived latterly in North Hinksey and was survived by his three children, his wife Helen having predeceased him.

Howard Stephens

3 May 1921 – 25 July 2013

Howard Stephens, organist and music teacher, died on 25 July 2013, aged 92. Born in Hounslow, he was educated at Isleworth Grammar School and the Royal College of Music. After war service in the RAF, he was elected organ scholar of Keble College, Oxford, in 1946. He served as organist of St Thomas’s Church in Regent Street and then assistant organist at Exeter Cathedral, before moving full-time into music education. He was director of music at Birkenhead School, principal lecturer at Borough Road College, Isleworth, and then head of music at West London Institute of Higher Education. He contributed to a number of music periodicals, served as an examiner for Trinity College of Music and the Oxford Delegacy of Local Examinations, and was for many years organist of St Mary’s Church, Osterley. He was survived by four children, his wife having predeceased him.

Kim Taylor

4 August 1922 – 20 July 2013

Len Clive (Kim) Taylor, headmaster and educationist, died on 20 July 2013, aged 90. Born in Calcutta, the son of the head of an advertising agency, he was educated at Sevenoaks School. During the Second World War he taught for a few years at St Paul’s School, Darjeeling, before being commissioned into the Indian Army, serving in Burma. After demobilisation he went to New College, Oxford, where he read Modern History, graduating in 1948 and winning a Blue as a heavyweight boxer. He then spent a year at Chicago University studying Psychology before entering teaching, initially at Repton. From 1954 to 1968 he was a reforming headmaster of Sevenoaks School. He was subsequently director of the Nuffield Foundation ‘Resources for Learning’ project, principal administrator of the Centre for Educational Research and Innovation of the OECD, head of educational programming at the IBA, and finally director of the UK branch of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation. He was survived by three children, his wife having predeceased him.

James Boulton

17 February 1924 – 19 July 2013

The literary scholar James Thompson Boulton FBA, FRSL, died on 19 July 2013, aged 89. Born in Pickering, the son of a joiner and undertaker, he was educated at Lady Lumley’s Grammar School, Pickering, University College, Durham (interrupted by war service in the RAF), and Lincoln College, Oxford, where he took his BLitt in 1952. He was a lecturer at Nottingham University from 1951 to 1964, professor there until 1975, and then professor and head of the English department at the University of Birmingham until 1988. From 1987 to 1999 he was director, and from 1999 to 2006 deputy director, of the Institute for Advanced Research in the Humanities at Birmingham. He was best known for his editorship of the Cambridge edition of The Letters of D. H. Lawrence (1979-2000), although he was also a noted scholar of eighteenth-century literature. He was elected FBA in 1994. He was survived by his wife Margaret and their two children.

Mel Smith

3 December 1952 – 19 July 2013

The actor, comedian, director and producer Melvyn Kenneth (Mel) Smith died on 19 July 2013, aged 60. Born in London, the son of a grocer-turned-bookkeeper, he was educated at Latymer Upper School, Hammersmith, and New College, Oxford, where he studied Psychology and discovered his passion for theatre and comedy. After graduating he became an assistant director with the Royal Court Theatre and then the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield. As an actor and comic, he was best known for his roles in Not the Nine O’Clock News (1979-82) and Alas Smith and Jones, subsequently Smith and Jones (1984-98); contrary to their on-screen ‘dumb and dumber’ personae, he and his partner in the latter series, Griff Rhys Jones, set up Talkback Productions, one of the first independent production companies, which was later sold for a reported £62 million. He also directed a number of plays and films, including Bean (1997), starring his friend Rowan Atkinson. He was survived by his wife Pam.

Douglas Stuart

18 August 1918 – 13 July 2013

The broadcaster Douglas Willoughby Stuart died on 13 July 2014, aged 94. Born in Calcutta, the son of an auctioneer, he was educated at Harrow School and New College, Oxford, but he left without completing a degree. In 1939 he was commissioned into the Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire Regiment; he was captured in Italy in 1943 and spent nineteen months as a prisoner of war, latterly in Germany. After liberation he joined the BBC, initially working for the Overseas Service and then as a foreign correspondent, reporting from India, the United States and Germany before serving successively as Middle East correspondent, Vienna correspondent (at the height of the Cold War), and Washington correspondent. 1IIn 1970 he was chosen to launch The World Tonight on Radio 4. He retired in 1984. He was survived by his wife Margaret and their three children.

Elaine Morgan

7 November 1920 – 12 July 2013

Elaine Morgan (née Floyd) OBE, screenwriter and author, died on 12 July 2013, aged 92. Born near Pontypridd, the daughter of a miner, she won an exhibition to Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, where she read English, graduating in 1942. In 1942 she married a French teacher, Morien Morgan, and settled in Mountain Ash, in the Cynon Valley. As a screenwriter she specialised in biographies and adaptations of books; she won two Baftas, two Writers’ Guild awards, and a Prix Italia, the latter for her adaptation of a memoir by Joey Deacon, a man with cerebral palsy. She also wrote several books propounding the ‘aquatic ape’ theory of human evolution, developing an idea first suggested by Sir Alister Hardy. Her Descent of Woman (1972), while propounding this theory, also challenged what she saw as the male-centred conventional theories of evolution, with their emphasis on ‘man the hunter’. She was made an OBE in 2009. She was survived by two sons, her husband and one son having predeceased her.

John Tiley

25 February 1941 – 30 June 2013

The legal scholar John Tiley CBE, FBA, died on 30 June 2013, aged 72. He was educated at Winchester and Lincoln College, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence, winning the Winter Williams Scholarship in 1961, and taking his BCL in 1963, having graduated the previous year. He was called to the bar by the Inner Temple in 1964, subsequently becoming an honorary bencher in 1993, and a recorder from 1989 to 1999, but he pursued an academic career, as a lecturer at Lincoln College, Oxford (1963-4) and the University of Birmingham (1964-7) before moving to the University of Cambridge, where he became a reader in 1987 and Professor of the Law of Taxation from 1990 until 2008. He wrote extensively and his advice was much sought after. He was appointed CBE in 2003 and elected FBA in 2008. He was survived by his wife Jillinda and their three children.

James Martin

19 October 1933 – 24 June 2013

James Martin, computer scientist and philanthropist, died on 24 June 2013, aged 79. Born in Ashby de la Zouch, Leicestershire, the son of a clerical worker, he was educated at Keble College, Oxford, where he read Physics, graduating in 1955. After national service he joined IBM and was a key figure in the development of some early computer technologies. At the same time he started writing books on the impact of the new technologies, and in the mid-1970s left IBM to pursue a very successful career as a writer and lecturer, and to launch a series of business ventures which included the software development companies James Martin Associates (later partly acquired by Texas Instruments) and KnowledgeWare (acquired by Sterling). He wrote more than 100 books; the best known were the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Wired Society: A Challenge for Tomorrow (1977), which predicted with great accuracy developments including the world wide web and mobile phone technology, and The Meaning of the 21st Century (2006), later made the basis for an hour-long film narrated by Michael Douglas. In 2005 he became the then largest single benefactor in the history of Oxford University when he donated £60 million to found the Oxford Martin School, as a research institute looking at the challenges facing humanity. He later gave another $50 million (£36 million) of funding, matching donations from other benefactors. Since 1997 he owned and lived on Agar’s Island, in Bermuda. He was survived by his third wife, Lillian, the daughter of his first marriage, and four stepchildren.

Myles Bowen

23 August 1928 – 16 June 2013

(John) Myles Bowen OBE, geologist, died on 16 June 2013, aged 84. Born in Kent, he was educated at Sherborne School and, after national service in the Royal Artillery, Lincoln College, Oxford, where he read Geology. After graduating in 1951 he went to Edinburgh where in 1954 he completed a PhD on the geology of the Scottish borders. Joining Royal Dutch Shell, he was posted first to Borneo, then to Venezuela, and then to the Netherlands, where he was involved in the discovery of the Groningen gas field. Returning to Britain in 1969, he led the team which discovered the Brent oil field. He retired from Shell in 1982, but then took on the job of exploration director for Enterprise Oil (which took over the North Sea oil assets of the Gas Council), identifying new oil reserves in previously unexploited areas of the North Sea, and in southern Italy. It was estimated that by the time he retired he had in total discovered some 7.5 billion barrels of oil. He was made an OBE in 1977. He was survived by his wife Margaret and three daughters.

Ian Cunnison

13 February 1923 – 16 June 2013

The anthropologist Ian George Cunnison died on 16 June 2013, aged 90. The son of an economics teacher at Glasgow University, he was educated at Glasgow Academy. His Cambridge education was interrupted by war service in North Africa and Italy. After graduating in Archaeology and Anthropology in 1947 he joined the Institute of Social Anthropology in Oxford, where in 1952 he completed a DPhil supervised by Max Gluckman and based on fieldwork in the Luapula Valley in modern-day Zambia. Encouraged by Edward Evans-Pritchard, he then undertook research among the nomadic Humr tribe of southern Sudan, which later resulted in an acclaimed book, Baggara Arabs (1966). Meanwhile from 1955 to 1959 he taught at Manchester University before returning to the Sudan as the first professor of social anthropology at the University of Khartoum. On returning to Britain he became professor of social anthropology at Hull University until his retirement in 1989. He was for many years the editor of Sudan Notes and Records. He was survived by his wife Sheila and two daughters.

Frank Greenaway

9 July 1917 – 16 June 2013

Frank Greenaway FRSC, FSA, historian of science and museum curator, died on 16 June 2013, aged 95. Born in Cardiff, the son of a shopkeeper, he was educated at the High School there and at Jesus College, Oxford, where he read Chemistry but, with the war looming, left after part one in 1939. During the war he worked initially for the Royal Army Ordnance Corps, but he was invalided out with a duodenal ulcer, and spent the remainder of the war teaching, and then working in the research laboratories of Kodak. He joined the staff of the Science Museum in 1949, and remained there until his retirement in 1991, as keeper of the chemistry department (introducing innovative historical displays) from 1967, and a research fellow from 1980. From 1970 to 1985 he was a reader in the history of science at the Royal Institution, where he was closely involved with setting up the Faraday Museum. He wrote several books and many papers on the history of chemistry and on museums. He was survived by three daughters; he was predeceased by his wife Miranda, a son, and a stepson.

John Gifford

24 December 1946 – 13 June 2013

John Vernon Gifford MBE, architectural historian, died on 13 June 2013, aged 66. Born in London of Scottish parents (his father was an economist in the Foreign Office), he read Modern History at New College, Oxford. His interest in architectural history took him to the Historic Buildings Branch of the Scottish Development Department and to the Buildings of Scotland project, for which he worked for some forty years and produced eight volumes, earning himself the description ‘the Scottish Pevsner’. He was a committed Anglican, and an elected member of the General Synod of the Scottish Episcopal Church. He was survived by his partner, David Bassett.

Malcolm Todd

27 November 1939 – 6 June 2013

The archaeologist Malcolm Todd died on 6 June 2013, aged 73. Born in Durham, he was educated at the Grammar School in Hartlepool, St David’s College, Lampeter, where he read classics, and Brasenose College, Oxford, where he took a diploma in archaeology and won the T. W. Greene Prize in 1963. After a spell as a research assistant at the Rheinisches Landesmuseum in Bonn he joined the staff of the University of Nottingham, where he became a reader in 1977. He was subsequently professor of archaeology at the University of Exeter (1979-96) and then Principal of Trevelyan College, Durham (1996-2000). As an archaeologist he specialised in the archaeology of Roman Britain, but he was also a noted authority on the Germanic tribes in Roman times; his book on The Early Germans (1992) was translated into Italian, Czech, and Turkish as well as German. He was survived by his wife Molly and their two children.

Sir Patrick Nairne

15 August 1921 – 4 June 2013

Sir Patrick Dalmahoy Nairne GCB, MC, Master of St Catherine’s College from 1981 to 1988, died on 4 June 2013, aged 91. The son of an army officer, he was educated at Radley College and, after war service with the Seaforth Highlanders (with whom he took part in the battle of El Alamein and the invasion of Sicily, where he won his MC), University College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. After graduating in 1947 he joined the civil service, working initially in the Admiralty and then in the enlarged Ministry of Defence. He was Deputy Under-Secretary in charge of policy and programmes from 1970 to 1973. He then moved to the Cabinet Office as Second Permanent Secretary from 1973 to 1975, overseeing civil contingencies arrangements during the three-day week, and then the arrangements for the 1975 referendum on Europe. He ended his career as Permanent Secretary at the Department of Health and Social Security, from 1975 to 1981. He was made a KCB in 1975 and a GCB in 1981. In retirement, as well as serving as Master of St Catherine’s, he was involved in many cultural and educational organisations, including several based in Oxford. He was Chancellor of Essex University from 1983 to 1997. He was survived by his wife Penelope and their six children (including the director of the National Portrait Gallery, Sandy Nairne, and Andrew Nairne, director of Kettle’s Yard art gallery, Cambridge).

Lord Gilbert

5 April 1927 – 2 June 2013

John William Gilbert, Baron Gilbert PC, accountant and politician, died on 2 June 2013, aged 86. The son of a civil servant, he was educated at Merchant Taylors’ School, Northwood, and St John’s College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics and was secretary of the Labour Club, graduating in 1951. He qualified and practised as an accountant in Canada, then worked in international banking in New York, where he took a PhD in International Economics at New York University. Returning to Britain in 1966, he contested Ludlow for the Labour Party in 1966 and Dudley in a by-election in 1968 and again in the general election in 1970, winning the seat in the latter year and retaining it (through boundary changes which made it Dudley East) until 1997, when he was elevated to the Lords. He served as Financial Secretary to the Treasury in 1974-5, Minister for Transport in 1975-6, and Minister of State at the Ministry of Defence in 1976-9 and again in 1997-9. He was survived by his wife Jean and one of the two daughters of his first marriage.

Ronald Payne

6 February 1926 – 25 May 2013

Ronald Stavely Payne, journalist, died on 25 May 2013, aged 87. Born in Ripon, Yorkshire, he was educated at Bedford School and, after war service with the Royal Marines in 42 Commando, Jesus College, Oxford, where he read Modern History, graduating in 1949. He worked for the Reading Mercury and the Evening Standard before beginning a long association with the Daily Telegraph. As a foreign correspondent he was based first in Paris but soon specialised in the Middle East and North Africa, covering decolonisation, the Suez crisis, and various small wars. On one occasion, covering Oman for the Telegraph, the helicopter he was in was forced to make a crash landing, and he suffered a broken back and spent six months in traction. He wrote several books, ranging from a study of Carlos the Jackal to 100 Ways to Live with a Cat Addict. He was survived by his wife, the journalist Celia Haddon, and a stepdaughter.

Elizabeth Mavor

17 December 1927 – 22 May 2013

The novelist and biographer Elizabeth Osborne Mavor died on 22 May 2013, aged 85. She was born in Glasgow, the daughter of an engineer, and educated at St Leonards School, St Andrews, and St Anne’s College, Oxford, where she read Modern History and edited Cherwell, graduating in 1950. She worked briefly for the magazine Argosy before embarking on her career as a writer of fiction and non-fiction, both largely centred on adventurous women. Her novel A Green Equinox was shortlisted for the Booker Prize in 1973, and The White Solitaire (1988), a fictionalised account of Mary Read, the eighteenth-century soldier and pirate, was well reviewed. She was perhaps best known for The Ladies of Llangollen (1971), a study of Lady Eleanor Butler and Sarah Ponsonby, two formidably intelligent women who lived together in the north Wales village for some fifty years in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. She also edited the travel journals of Fanny Kemble and Katherine Wilmot, and wrote several other biographies. She was survived by her husband, the illustrator Haro Hodson, and their two sons.

Rupert Dilnott-Cooper

1 January 1954 – 20 May 2013

The television executive Rupert Michael Walter James Dilnott-Cooper died on 20 May 2013, aged 59. The son of Kenneth Dilnott-Copper, the Canadian film executive and skier, he was educated at Eton and Hertford College, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence (and sometimes shared tutorials with Tony Blair). After graduating in 1976 he joined Productions Associates, initially working on the public relations side. In 1979 he joined Lew Grade’s production company ITC, becoming head of contracts and copyright at its successor Central Independent Television, and then director of the international sales division, a role he continued when the company was taken over by Carlton Television. He was subsequently managing director of Carlton International, then chief executive of Carlton’s content division. He continued to work as a director of other television production companies after Carlton merged with Granada in 2004. He was survived by his wife Kate and their two sons.

Maurice Hutt

22 September 1928 – 20 May 2013

Maurice George Hutt, historian, died on 20 May 2013, aged 84. Born in Rugby, the son of a college principal, he was educated at the King Edward VI Grammar School in Stratford-upon-Avon and Jesus College, Oxford, where he read Modern History, graduating in 1951 and taking his BLitt in 1955. He attended Cornell University as a Fulbright Scholar and was a lecturer at Leeds University until 1961 when he was one of the first recruits to teach at the new University of Sussex, where he remained, latterly as a professor, until taking early retirement in 1979. His published work was on the French Revolution, and he was particularly well known for his work on British attempts to undermine the French revolutionary regimes. He was survived by five children, his wife having predeceased him.

Sir Denys Roberts

19 January 1923 – 19 May 2013

Sir Denys Tudor Emil Roberts KBE, colonial civil servant and judge, died on 19 May 2013, aged 90. The son of a barrister, he was educated at Aldenham School and Wadham College, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence. His studies were interrupted by the Second World War, during which he served with the Royal Artillery in northern Europe and India. He graduated in 1948, took his BCL in 1949, and was called to the bar by Lincoln’s Inn in 1950. He joined the Colonial Service in 1953, serving as a Crown Counsel in Nyasaland then Attorney-General in Gibraltar before moving to Hong Kong, where he was successively Solicitor-General (1962-6), Attorney-General (1966-73), Chief Secretary (1973-8) and Chief Justice (1979-88). The Chief Justice of Hong Kong traditionally also served as Chief Justice of Brunei, but Roberts was asked to remain Chief Justice of Brunei until 2001; he was then President of the Court of Appeal in 2002-3. He was also President of the Court of Appeal of Bermuda from 1988 to 1994. He wrote a number of comic novels of legal and colonial life, and several volumes of light-hearted memoirs. He was President of the MCC in 1989-90.

Robert Denning

3 August 1938 – 16 May 2013

Robert Gordon Denning, tutorial fellow in organic chemistry at Magdalen College, Oxford, from 1968 to 2005 and Professor of Inorganic Chemistry from 1996, died on 16 May 2013, aged 74. The son of the eminent judge, Lord Denning, he was educated at Winchester College and, after national service in Libya with the King’s Royal Rifle Corps, Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read Chemistry. He graduated in 1962 and stayed on to take his DPhil in 1965 under the supervision of Luigi Venanzi. He then worked at the University of Illinois for three years before returning to Magdalen to succeed Venanzi as tutorial fellow and university lecturer in organic chemistry. He was particularly noted for his work using high-resolution spectroscopic techniques to identify the electronic structure of crystals. He was Vice-President of Magdalen in 1985-6 and was a popular tutor. He was also a keen cricketer and community figure in the Baldons, south-east of Oxford, where he lived. He was survived by his wife Elizabeth and their two sons.

Robin Nisbet

21 May 1925 – 14 May 2013

Robin George Murdoch Nisbet FBA, Corpus Professor of Latin at Oxford from 1970 to 1992, died on 14 May 2013, aged 87. The son of the Latin scholar R. G. Nisbet (with whom he was often confused), he was educated at Glasgow Academy, Glasgow University, and, as a Snell Exhibitioner, Balliol College, Oxford. He graduated with a second degree, in Literae Humaniores, in 1951, and was immediately appointed to a junior research fellowship at Corpus Christi College, thus beginning an association which lasted more than sixty years. He was appointed a tutorial fellow there in 1952, and on his retirement as Corpus Professor was elected an honorary fellow. He published many influential essays on Latin poetry and other literature, as well as highly-regarded studies of Cicero and Horace’s Odes. He also excelled as a teacher, and was an important figure in changes to the Literae Humaniores syllabus. He was elected an FBA in 1967. His wife Anne predeceased him, and he had been suffering ill-health for some time.

Malcolm Parkes

26 June 1930 – 10 May 2013

The palaeographer and cultural historian Malcolm Beckwith Parkes FBA died on 10 May 2013, aged 82. Born in Charlton, south London, he was educated at Colfe’s Grammar School (evacuated during the war first to Tunbridge Wells and then to Frome) and, after working as a supply teacher in south London, Hertford College, Oxford, where he read English, graduating in 1953 (and taking his BLitt in 1959). After a short spell as an archivist at Lambeth Palace Library he returned to Oxford as a lecturer in English Language at Keble and Mansfield colleges before becoming in 1965 a fellow and tutor in English Language at Keble College, where he remained until 1997, serving also as fellow librarian from 1965 to 1974. He was Professor of Palaeography (1996-7) and Lyell Reader in Bibliography (1998-9). He was a leading authority on medieval handwriting and medieval scribes, and in 1992 the author of Pause and Effect: An Introduction to the History of Punctuation in the West. He was elected FBA in 1993. He was survived by his two sons, his wife Ann having predeceased him.

Lord Reay

19 July 1937 – 10 May 2013

Hugh William Mackay, fourteenth Lord Reay, chief of the Clan Mackay, died on 10 May 2013, aged 75. The only son of Aeneas Alexander Mackay, the thirteenth Lord Reay, he was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford, where (as Master of Reay) he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1961. In 1963 he succeeded his father in his titles and estates (which included a castle and extensive land in the fruit-growing area of the Netherlands), and as a Scottish representative peer. He remained in the House of Lords after the reforms of 1999. He sat briefly as a Liberal and cross-bencher before joining the Conservatives. From 1973 to 1979 he was a nominated member of the European Parliament, and from 1979 to 1986 he was a delegate to the Council of Europe and Western European Union. He was briefly a junior whip in 1989-91 and a parliamentary under-secretary of state at the DTI in 1991-2. He was survived by his second wife Victoria, daughter of the first Lord Bruntisfield, their two children, and three children from his first marriage, to Tessa Fraser, daughter of the seventeenth Lord Lovat.

Geza Vermes

22 June 1924 – 8 May 2013

Geza Vermes FBA, Reader in Jewish Studies at the University of Oxford from 1965 to 1989, and Professor of Jewish Studies from 1989 to 1991, died on 8 May 2013, aged 88. Born in Hungary, the son of a journalist, into a Jewish family which had converted to Christianity, he was educated at the Gymnasium and university in Budapest, before joining a Catholic seminary. He survived the deportation of Hungarian Jews in 1944 but lost both his parents. After the war he continued to train for the priesthood at Louvain, where he took his DTheol in 1953, but he left his vocation in 1955 after falling in love with a married Englishwoman, whom he followed to England in 1957 and married the following year. From 1957 to 1965 he taught at the University of Newcastle, before moving to Oxford. He translated the Dead Sea Scrolls, and wrote extensively on the Jewish background of early Christianity, notably in the highly influential Jesus the Jew (1973). From 1971 to 1996 he was editor of the Journal of Jewish Studies. He had by this time returned to his Jewish roots, becoming a member of the Liberal Jewish Synagogue. He received numerous honours. His first wife, Pamela, died in 1993 and he was survived by his second wife, Margaret, and his stepson.

Jane Wilford

27 November 1945 – 5 May 2013

Jane Mary Wilford, journalist and physician, died on 5 May 2013, aged 67. The eldest daughter of the diplomat Sir Michael Wilford, she attended Lady Margaret Hall, where she read Philosophy, Politics and Economics. After graduating she worked as a journalist for the Financial Times. While in Paris for the paper she met and entered into a short-lived marriage to an architect, Ivan Bergerol. She travelled with him to Africa, and after the break-up of their marriage remained there, moving to Angola, where she reported the civil war for the Financial Times, the Observer and the BBC. She subsequently qualified as a physician, first in Angola then in the United Kingdom. In 1994 she moved to Soweto, South Africa, where she worked in the public health sector. She was survived by a daughter, Nonkululeko, whose father, a Sowetan combatant in the Angolan civil war, died while his daughter was still young.

Mark Sheldon

6 February 1931 – 3 May 2013

Mark Hebberton Sheldon CBE, solicitor, died on 34 May 2013, aged 82. Born in Lancashire, he was educated at Stand Grammar School, Wycliffe College in Gloucestershire, and, after national service in the Royal Signals, Corpus Christi College, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence. Articled to James Sandars at Linklaters & Paines, he qualified in 1957, and remained with the firm throughout his career, becoming a partner in 1959 and senior partner in 1988. In 1972, anticipating global trends, he opened Linklaters’ first New York office. He also fought to maintain access to the legal profession for non-law graduates and school leavers. As president of the Law Society in 1992-3 he adopted as his slogan ‘One Profession’, encouraging links between solicitors and other legal practitioners. In retirement after 1993 he was involved in several charitable initiatives, including as director of the Personal Support Unit at the Royal Courts of Justice, which he helped to set up to provide advice and support to witnesses and others caught up in legal proceedings. He was appointed CBE in 1998. He was survived by his wife Catherine and their two children.

Penry Williams

25 February 1925 – 30 April 2013

Penry Herbert Williams, fellow and tutor in Modern History at New College from 1964 to 1992, died on 30 April 2013, aged 88. Born in Calcutta, he was educated at Marlborough College and – after war and postwar service in the Royal Artillery, latterly in India and Java – New College, Oxford, where he graduated in Modern History in 1949. Recommended by his tutor Alan Bullock to Lewis Namier, he was appointed an assistant lecturer at the University of Manchester in 1951. He became a lecturer in 1954 and a senior lecturer in 1963, meanwhile taking his Oxford DPhil in 1959 for a thesis on the Tudor Council of the Welsh Marches, before returning to New College in 1964. He was a popular and dedicated college tutor. Among his published works were books on Tudor social and political history (including in 1995 the volume on the later Tudors for the New Oxford History of England series), a history of New College (1979), and a biography of Sir Walter Raleigh (2011). He devoted much of his retirement to supporting asylum speakers at Campsfield and further afield. His wife June died in 1991, and he was survived by his partner Sylvia and the two children of his marriage.

James Leonard

12 May 1940 – 28 April 2013

James Leonard, insurance broker, ornithologist and crossword compiler, died on 28 April 2013, aged 72. Born in Barnstaple, the son of a judge, he was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford, where he played tennis and rackets, and read Mathematics, graduating in 1961. From 1964 until taking early retirement in 1989 he worked as a broker and underwriter at Lloyd’s; he later worked as an expert court witness and a freelance insurance adviser. A passionate birdwatcher, he was a regular visitor to the isle of Lundy. He first discovered a talent for setting crosswords in the 1970s, and from 1992 to 2010 he was part of the team which set the Enigmatic Variations crosswords for the Sunday Telegraph. He never married.

Patrick Sandars

29 March 1935 – 26 April 2013

Patrick George Henry Sandars, Professor of Experimental Physics and Student of Christ Church, Oxford, from 1978 to 2000, died on 26 April 2013, aged 78. The great-grandson of the archaeologist Lord Avebury, he was educated at Wellington College and Balliol College, Oxford. He graduated in Physics in 1956 and took his DPhil in 1959. From 1960 to 1963 he was Weir Junior Research Fellow at University College before returning to Balliol as tutorial fellow and university lecturer in physics. He was made a reader in 1972. He was head of the Clarendon Laboratory from 1987 to 1990 and head of Atomic and Laser Physics from 1990 to 1995. He was particularly noted for his research into the symmetry of atoms and molecules. He was survived by his wife Patricia and their two sons.

John A. S. Smith

7 August 1927 – 25 April 2013

The chemist John Alec Sydney Smith died on 25 April 2013, aged 85. Born in Nottingham, he was educated at Nottingham High School and Lincoln College, Oxford, where he read Chemistry, graduating in 1949 and then completing a DPhil under the supervision of Rex Richards (as the latter’s first graduate student). He went on to positions at the universities of Leeds and Warwick before becoming Professor of Chemistry at Queen Elizabeth College, University of London, then at King’s College after the merger of the two colleges. He was an internationally recognised expert on nuclear magnetic resonance, and in particular the use of nuclear quadrupole resonance in studying solids (with practical uses such as identifying explosives and narcotics, and the prevention of counterfeit pharmaceuticals). He was survived by his wife Selma and daughter.

Patrick Garland

10 April 1935 – 20 April 2013

The theatre director and author Patrick Ewart Garland died on 20 April 2013, aged 78. He was educated at St Mary’s College, Southampton (where he won a national competition for a poem in honour of Winston Churchill’s 79th birthday), and St Edmund Hall, Oxford, where he read English, and was president of Oxford University Dramatic Society. After graduating in 1959 he acted for the Bristol Old Vic then joined Melvyn Bragg as a researcher for the BBC arts programme Monitor. His first stage success was an adaptation of John Aubrey’s Brief Lives in 1967. He went on to direct numerous acclaimed productions, ranging from one-man shows to musicals and other large West End productions. He scored a particular success with Alan Bennett’s Forty Years On (1968). He was artistic director of the Chichester Festival in 1980-4 and again in 1991-4. He also published poetry, a novel, a children’s book, and a memoir of Rex Harrison. He was survived by his wife, the actress Alexandra Bastedo.

Rick Mather

30 May 1937 – 20 April 2013

Rick Mather, an architect who worked on many Oxford buildings, died on 20 April 2013, aged 75. Born in Portland, Oregon, he studied at the University of Oregon and the Architectural Association. He started his own practice in 1973, specialising in the renovation, modernisation and extension of existing buildings. His work in Oxford included a new quad for Keble College, a new auditorium at Corpus Christi College, a library extension at the Queen’s College, and the re-design of the Ashmolean Museum, which narrowly missed winning the Stirling Prize in 2010. Other projects which bore his stamp included the extensions to Dulwich Picture Gallery, the National Maritime Museum, and the Wallace Collection. In 2012 he was appointed to lead the £100 million refurbishment of Centre Point tower in central London. He was survived by his partner David Scrase, assistant director of the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge.

Dominic Beer

4 November 1956 – 19 April 2013

Dominic Beer, psychiatrist, died on 19 April 2013, aged 56. Born in Reading, he was educated at Leighton Park School and Wadham College, Oxford, where he read Modern History and Modern Languages then switched to Medicine, completing his training at Guy’s Hospital. Becoming a member of the Royal College of Psychiatry in 1989 and a fellow in 2004, from 1994 he was consultant psychiatrist at the challenging behaviour unit at Bexley Hospital. He published widely on psychiatric intensive care and the history of psychiatry, and was co-editor of a textbook on Psychiatric Intensive Care (2000). He was an active member of the National Association of Psychiatric Intensive Care Units, and of the Christian Medical Fellowship. He was survived by his wife Naomi and their four children.

Ernle Money

17 February 1931 – 14 April 2013

Ernle David Drummond Money CBE, barrister and Conservative MP, died on 14 April 2013, aged 82. He was educated at Marlborough College and, after national service in the Suffolk Regiment, Oriel College, Oxford, where he read Modern History, graduating in 1954. He was called to the bar by Lincoln’s Inn in 1958. He was elected Conservative MP for Ipswich, taking the seat from Labour by 13 votes, in the 1970 election, and held it again in February 1974, but lost to Labour in October 1974. He was briefly opposition spokesman on the arts, between the two 1974 elections. Passionate about the arts, he was a key figure in the campaign to save Titian’s Death of Actaeon for the nation. He was also president of Ipswich Town FC’s supporters’ club from 1974 to 1980 (and was delighted when Ipswich Town won the FA Cup in 1978). He wrote, with Peter Johnson, The Nasmyth Family of Painters (1970), as well as a biography of Margaret Thatcher, published in 1975. He was survived by two sons and two daughters.

Sir John Burgh

9 December 1925 – 12 April 2013

Sir John Charles Burgh KCMG, CB, civil servant and President of Trinity College, Oxford, from 1987 to 1996, died on 12 April 2013, aged 87. Born in Vienna to a secular Jewish family, he escaped from Nazism in 1938 and attended the Friends’ School in Sibford, Oxfordshire. During the Second World War he worked in munitions factories; afterwards he studied at the LSE, where he became president of the student union. He joined the Board of Trade in 1950, remaining there (with an interval in 1959-62 at the Colonial Office, working on the Hong Kong desk) until 1964; he subsequently held senior positions at the departments of Economic Affairs, Employment, and Prices and Consumer Protection. He was also, in 1970-2, deputy chair of the Central Policy Review Staff, under Lord Rothschild. He left the civil service in 1980, and served from then until 1987 as Director-General of the British Council. He was knighted KCMG in 1982. He was survived by his wife Ann and their two daughters.

Thomas Hemsley

12 April 1927 – 11 April 2013

The baritone Thomas Jeffrey Hemsley CBE died on 11 April 2013, aged 85. Born in Coalville, Leicester, he was educated at Ashby de la Zouch Grammar School and Brasenose College, Oxford, where he read Physics, graduating in 1948, and was also a member of the New College Choir. After leaving Oxford he was a vicar choral at St Paul’s Cathedral before moving to the Stadttheater in Aachen as principal baritone in 1953. He subsequently held similar roles at the Deutsche Oper am Rhein in Düsseldorf and the Opernhaus in Zürich before launching on a career as a freelance opera and concert singer in 1967. He appeared frequently at Glyndebourne, Bayreuth, and the Edinburgh Festival, and from 1987 to 2004 was a professor at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. In 1998 he published Singing and Imagination, summarising his philosophy of singing, and in 2000 he was appointed CBE. He was survived by his wife Gwenllian, with whom he had three sons.

Baroness Thatcher

13 October 1925 – 8 April 2013

Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher LG, OM, PC, FRS, prime minister of the United Kingdom from 1979 to 1990, died on 8 April 2013, aged 87. Born Margaret Roberts in Grantham, a grocer’s daughter, she was educated at Kesteven and Grantham Girls’ School and Somerville College, Oxford, where she read Chemistry and was president of the University Conservative Association. After graduating in 1947 she worked as a research chemist for J. Lyons & Co. until her marriage to Denis Thatcher in 1951. She was called to the bar by Lincoln’s Inn in 1954, and became Conservative MP for Finchley from 1959 to 1992. She was Secretary of State for Education from 1970 to 1974 and became leader of the Conservative Party in 1975, leading it to three election victories, in 1979, 1983 and 1987. A deeply divisive figure with a strong and combative leadership style, she was best known abroad for her determination to recover the Falkland Islands when they were invaded by Argentina in 1983, her hawkish stance on the Cold War, her increasing Euroscepticism, and her opposition to Commonwealth sanctions against South Africa. At home she was best known for riding out the miners’ strike in 1984-5, her programme of wholesale privatisation of the nationalised industries, her reforms of local government and of the civil service, and the ill-fated introduction of the community charge (or ‘poll tax’) in 1989-90. She was forced to resign as leader of the Conservative Party (and Prime Minister) in 1990. She was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1983, a member of the Order of Merit in 1990, a life peer in 1992, and a Lady Companion of the Order of the Garter in 1995. In 1985 she was proposed for an honorary degree by Oxford’s Hebdomadal Council, but Congregation voted 738 to 319 against. She gave her papers to Churchill College, Cambridge. She was survived by her twin children Mark (who had inherited his father’s baronetcy on the latter’s death in 2003) and Carol.

James Dickens

4 April 1931 – 5 April 2013

James McCulloch York Dickens OBE, politician and industrial relations manager, died on 5 April 2013, aged 82. Born in Glasgow, he left Shawlands Academy at the age of fourteen, but later completed his education at Newbattle Abbey adult education college, Ruskin College, Oxford, and St Catherine’s Society, Oxford, where he read Modern History, graduating in 1956. He became an industrial relations officer at the National Coal Board in 1958, and a management consultant in 1965. From 1966 to 1970 he was Labour MP for West Lewisham, traditionally a Conservative seat. He was noted for his left-wing views and forensic mind. After losing the seat at the 1970 election he worked in manpower services and personnel management for the National Freight Corporation, the National Water Council, and finally the Agricultural and Food Research Council. He retired in 1991. He was survived by his second wife, Carolyn.

Sir Anthony Montague Browne

8 May 1923 – 1 April 2013

The diplomat and businessman Sir Anthony Arthur Duncan Montague Browne KCMG, CBE, DFC, who served as Winston Churchill’s last Private Secretary, died on 1 April 2013, aged 89. Educated at Stowe School and Magdalen College, Oxford, his education was interrupted by the Second World War, during which he flew Beaufighters in the RAF and was awarded a DFC for operations over Burma. On demobilisation he returned to Oxford but in 1946 entered the Foreign (later Diplomatic) Service, serving from 1949 to 1952 at the British Embassy in Paris. In 1952 he was picked from a shortlist by Churchill to be his Private Secretary, remaining in that post after Churchill resigned as Prime Minister in 1955, until Churchill’s death in 1965. He then spent two years seconded to HM Household before leaving the Foreign Office. From 1967 to 1977 he was a director of Columbia (British) Productions, and from 1970 to 1983 managing director of Gerrard and National PLC. In 1995 he published a memoir of his years with Churchill, and he was knighted KCMG in 2000. He was twice married and had one daughter.

Barrie Dobson

3 November 1931 – 29 March 2013

The medieval historian (Richard) Barrie Dobson FBA died on 29 March 2013, aged 81. Born in Co. Durham, he was educated at Barnard Castle School and Wadham College, Oxford, where he read Modern History and graduated in 1954. He was then a Senior Demy at Magdalen College, and in 1963 obtained his DPhil for a thesis on the Priory of Durham in the fifteenth century. Meanwhile he had been appointed a lecturer in medieval history at the University of St Andrews in 1958, in 1964 joining the new University of York, where he became successively lecturer, senior lecturer, reader and professor. From 1988 to 1999 he was Professor of Medieval History at Cambridge, and a fellow of Christ’s College. As well as ecclesiastical history, he published books on the Peasants’ Revolt, Robin Hood, and the Jews of medieval York. He was elected an FBA in 1988. He was survived by his wife Narda and their two children.

Jean Floud

3 November 1915 – 28 March 2013

The sociologist Jean Esther Floud CBE died on 28 March 2013, aged 97. Born Jean McDonald in Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex, the daughter of a boot and shoe salesman, she was educated at the local state school and at the LSE, where she graduated in 1936 and met her husband, Peter Floud (later a Keeper at the Victoria and Albert Museum), whom she married in 1938. From 1940 to 1946 she was assistant to the Director of Education for the City of Oxford; she then returned to the LSE as a lecturer, and built a reputation as a pioneer in the sociology of education. She was perhaps best known for her book with A. H. Halsey, Social Class and Educational Opportunity (1956). From 1963 to 1972 she was an official fellow of Nuffield College, Oxford, and she was also a member of the Franks Commission of Inquiry into the University in 1964-6, the University Grants Committee from 1969 to 1974, and the Social Science Research Council from 1970 to 1973. She was Principal of Newnham College, Cambridge from 1972 to 1983, and was appointed CBE in 1976 but declined the offer of a life peerage. She was survived by her two daughters, her husband having predeceased her.

Leo Price

11 May 1924 – 24 March 2013

The barrister (Arthur) Leolin Price CBE, QC, died on 24 March 2013, aged 88. Born in Kent, the son of a headmaster, he was educated at the Judd School in Tonbridge and Keble College, Oxford, where he initially read Modern History. His undergraduate career was interrupted by service with the Royal Artillery, and when he returned to Oxford (where he became president of the University Conservative Association) he switched to Jurisprudence, in which he graduated in 1948. He was called to the bar by the Middle Temple in 1949. His work as a barrister ranged widely, and he was recognised as an expert on commercial and chancery litigation. He took silk in 1968, and was also a QC in the Bahamas and New South Wales. He was appointed CBE in 1996. A lifelong Conservative, he masterminded the unsuccessful legal challenges to the Maastricht Treaty and the treaties of Nice and Lisbon. He was survived by his four children, his wife Lindy (daughter of the Conservative peer Lord Brecon) having predeceased him.

David Shears

20 May 1926 – 20 March 2013

The journalist David John Arthur Shears died on 20 March 2013, aged 86. The son of a professor of French at Aberdeen University, he was educated at Christ’s Hospital and – after war and postwar service in the Royal Navy – St Edmund Hall, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1949. He began his career in journalism with the Bristol Evening Post before joining Reuters, including a lengthy spell in Pakistan, and then the Daily Telegraph, for which he was a foreign correspondent for 25 years until his retirement in 1986, based mostly in the United States, either side of a decade in West Germany, where he broke a number of espionage stories. After retirement he remained in America, writing books which included one about Ocracoke (the island off North Carolina) and another on paddle steamers. He was survived by his wife Ursula and their son.

Peter Smith

15 June 1926 – 12 March 2013

The architectural historian Peter Smith died on 12 March 2013, aged 86. Born in Co. Durham, the son of a schools inspector, he was educated at King Edward VI School, Southampton, and Lincoln College, Oxford, where he read Modern History, graduating in 1947. After undertaking postgraduate training at the Royal Institute of British Architects, in 1949 he joined the staff of the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales, of which he was secretary from 1973 to 1991. He was a recognised expert on Welsh domestic architecture from medieval times onwards, and was author of a landmark study of Houses of the Welsh Countryside (1975); he also saved many medieval structures from demolition. He was survived by his wife Joyce and their three children.

The Right Rev David Farmbrough

4 May 1929 – 9 March 2013

The Rt Rev David John Farmbrough, Bishop Suffragan of Bedford from 1981 to 1993, died on 9 March 2013, aged 83. He was educated at Bedford School and Lincoln College, Oxford, where he read Modern History, graduating in 1951. He then trained for the ministry at Westcott House, Cambridge. He was successively curate of Bishop’s Hatfield, priest-in-charge of St John’s, Hatfield, vicar of Bishop’s Stortford, and archdeacon of St Albans before becoming Bishop of Bedford. In retirement he was an assistant bishop in the diocese of St Albans, in which (unusually) he had served the whole of his ministry. His book for confirmation training, Belonging, Believing, Doing (1971), was widely used. He was survived by his wife Angela and their four children.

Peter Bromley

20 November 1922 – 6 March 2013

The jurist Peter Mann Bromley died on 6 March 2013, aged 90. Born in Ealing, he was educated at Ealing Grammar School and the Queen’s College, Oxford, initially reading French and German. His undergraduate career was interrupted by war service with the Royal Artillery. On his return to Oxford he switched to Jurisprudence, in which he graduated in 1947. He was called to the bar by the Middle Temple in 1951 but chose an academic career, having joined the University of Manchester as an assistant lecturer in 1947. He remained at Manchester for the rest of his career, becoming Professor of Law in 1965 and Pro-Vice-Chancellor from 1977 to 1981. He retired in 1986. He was a member of the University Grants Committee from 1978 to 1985 and of the Commonwealth Scholarships Commission from 1986 to 1992. He was best known as author of a ground-breaking textbook on Family Law, drawing together rules, principles and precedents from many different areas of law. First published in 1957, he saw it through to eight editions by 1992. He was survived by his wife Beatrice.

R. F. Holland

18 March 1923 – 5 March 2013

The philosopher Roy Fraser Holland died on 5 March 2013, aged 89. Born in Manchester, he was educated at Manchester Grammar School and University College, Oxford. After taking classical moderations in 1942 he served in the army as a regimental officer in Africa and South-East Asia. Returning to Oxford, he graduated in Literae Humaniores in 1948. In 1950 he took up a post as lecturer in philosophy at the University College of Swansea, where he was a key figure, with Peter Winch and D. Z. Phillips, in the emergence of the so-called ‘Swansea school’ of philosophy. He was later, from 1967 to 1983, Professor of Philosophy at the University of Leeds. He was survived by his wife Marie Elizabeth and their four children.

Peter Hardwick

28 February 1929 – 28 February 2013

Peter Reginald Hardwick, schoolmaster, died on 28 February 2013, his 84th birthday. Born in Birmingham, the son of a primary school headteacher, he was educated at King Edward’s School, Birmingham, and, after national service with the army in Hong Kong, Jesus College, Oxford, where he was a friend of Kenneth Tynan, read Modern History, and graduated in 1952. After various other jobs he joined the teaching staff of Stonyhurst College, Lancashire, in 1955 where, with a brief interlude back in Oxford, he remained until his retirement in 1994. For most of that time he was head of English at the school. He was later singled out by one of his former pupils, Mark Thompson, Director-General of the BBC, as a memorably inspirational teacher. He was survived by his wife Brigid and their four children.

Katherine Lindsay-MacDougall

26 December 1915 – 28 February 2013

Katherine Lindsay-MacDougall, schoolteacher, died on 28 February 2013, aged 97. Brought up by her mother (her father having been killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme, when she was six months old), she read Modern History at St Hilda’s College, Oxford, graduating in 1937. Her career as a history teacher at Benenden School was interrupted by the Second World War, during which she worked for the War Office before serving with the WRNS in Britain and Ceylon until 1946. She then worked for thirteen years as Custodian of Manuscripts at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich; while there she was chiefly responsible for the transcription and publication of Nelson’s letters to his wife. After five years working at a teacher training college in Northern Rhodesia she returned to Benenden as a house mistress and history teacher, retiring in 1972. She spent the last 41 years of her life in Ardfern, Argyllshire, where she became an authority on the area’s history. She never married.

Adrian Hollis

2 August 1940 – 26 February 2013

The classical scholar Adrian Hollis died on 26 February 2013, aged 72. Born in Bristol, the son of Sir Roger Hollis, Director-General of MI5 from 1956 to 1965, he was educated as a scholar at Eton College and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read Literae Humaniores, graduating in 1962. He took his BPhil in 1964. After three years teaching at St Andrews University he was appointed a lecturer in classics and a fellow of Keble College, where he became sub-Warden, retiring in 2007. He wrote a number of highly-regarded articles and commentaries on Latin and Hellenistic poetry, including works by Horace, Propertius, Ovid, and Virgil, as well as several lesser-known poets. He was also an aficionado of correspondence chess, winning the British Correspondence Chess Championship in 1966 and becoming a Correspondence Chess Grandmaster in 1976. He was survived by his wife Margaret and their three children.

Olive Sayce

31 October 1922 – 25 February 2013

Olive Sayce (née Olive Lenore Davison), scholar of medieval German, died on 25 February 2013, aged 90. Born in Wallsend on Tyne, from a family of shipbuilders, she was the first of her family to attend university, reading French and German at St Hugh’s College, Oxford. She graduated in 1945 and the following year was appointed a university lecturer in German and lecturer at Somerville College. She remained there for the rest of her life, as a research fellow from 1962, tutorial fellow from 1965, and emeritus fellow after her retirement in 1990. Her books ranged from a Grammar of the Gothic Language (1954) to Exemplary Comparison from Homer to Petrarch (2008); as well as medieval German poetry, the main focus of her research and writings, she wrote on poetry in medieval Latin, Old French, and Occitan. She was awarded an Oxford DLitt in 2000. Her husband, the French Renaissance scholar Richard Sayce, predeceased her. She was survived by her two daughters.

Nigel Glendinning

16 October 1929 – 23 February 2013

The art historian (Oliver) Nigel Valentine Glendinning died on 23 February 2013, aged 83. Born in East Sheen into a family noted for its artistic and musical interests, he was educated at St John’s School, Leatherhead, and, after national service with the Royal Army Educational Corps, King’s College, Cambridge, where he read modern languages. He subsequently completed a PhD thesis on the Spanish writer José Cadalso. From 1956 to 1962 he was a lecturer in Spanish at Oxford; he was subsequently professor of Spanish at the University of Southampton (1962-70), Trinity College, Dublin (1970-4), then Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London (1974-91). He was particularly noted for his writings on Goya and his contemporaries. His marriage to the author Victoria Glendinning ended in divorce; he was survived by their four sons.

Victor Collas

23 September 1923 – 17 February 2013

The Revd Canon Victor John Collas died on 17 February 2013. Born in Guernsey, he was educated at Elizabeth College there, then (having been evacuated from Guernsey on one of the last boats to sail before the German occupation) Pembroke College, Oxford, where he read Modern History, graduating in 1944. He then served in the Army Intelligence Corps, including in Palestine. After training and ordination he returned to Guernsey, where for many years he was rector of St Andrew’s parish and vice-dean of Guernsey. He was survived by a nephew and niece and their families.

David Whitehouse

15 October 1941 – 17 February 2013

The archaeologist David Bryn Whitehouse died on 17 February 2013, aged 71. Educated at King Edward’s School, Birmingham, and St John’s College, Cambridge, where he read Archaeology and Anthropology then took his PhD, he was Wainwright Fellow in Near Eastern Archaeology at Oxford from 1966 to 1973 and simultaneously director of excavations at Siraf. He then spent a year in Kabul as director of the British Institute of Afghan Studies, and ten years in Rome as director of the British School at Rome. In 1984 he joined the staff of the Corning Museum of Glass in New York, becoming deputy director in 1988, director in 1992, executive director in 1999, and senior scholar following his retirement in 2011. He was a leading expert on Roman, medieval and Islamic glass. He was survived by his wife Elizabeth-Anne, their three children, and the three children of his first marriage.

Jean Banister

10 March 1917 – 15 February 2013

The physiologist Jean Rachel Banister died on 15 February 2013, aged 95. Born in Hampshire, she was educated at Queen Anne’s School, Caversham, the Royal Academy of Music, and Edinburgh University, where she graduated in 1948. She was appointed a university lecturer in physiology at Oxford in 1949, becoming a fellow and tutor at Somerville College in 1951, where she remained until her retirement in 1984, when she became an emeritus fellow. She twice served as Vice-Principal, in 1969-72 and 1979-81. Her research focused on the vascular system in the lungs. A talented musician, she was also tutor for the students of fine arts and music at Somerville. She spent her retirement in Ardgour, near Fort William. She never married.

Hector Catling

26 June 1924 – 15 February 2013

The archaeologist Hector William Catling CBE died on 15 February 2013, aged 88. He was educated at Bristol Grammar School and, after four years in the Royal Navy, St John’s College, Oxford, where he read Literae Humaniores, graduating in 1950. He then embarked on a DPhil, awarded in 1957 for a thesis on the metal industry in Cyprus in the late Bronze Age. From 1955 to 1959 he worked for the Department of Antiquities in Cyprus before becoming an assistant keeper then senior assistant keeper at the Ashmolean Museum, where he remained until 1971, from 1967 also as a fellow of Linacre College. His final post was as director of the British School at Athens, from 1971 to 1989, where he inaugurated a laboratory for archaeological science and introduced taught courses. He was a leading expert on early Greek bronzework, and on the prehistory of Cyprus. He was made an honorary fellow of St John’s College in 1986. He was survived by his three children, his wife Elizabeth having predeceased him.

Gertrud Seidmann

16 September 1919 – 15 February 2013

The German scholar and historian of jewellery Gertrud Seidmann died on 15 February 2013, aged 93. Born in Vienna, she fled to Britain after the Anschluss in 1938; most of her family subsequently died in the Holocaust. She studied modern languages at Queen’s University, Belfast, followed by an MA for a thesis on the Austrian dramatist Johann Nestroy. She then taught German at Battersea County School, the Institute of Educational Studies at Oxford, and Southampton University, meanwhile pursuing a parallel career as a pioneering historian of jewellery. After her retirement she taught German to archaeology students at the Institute of Archaeology, Oxford, and in 2004 registered as a graduate student at Wolfson College. She was believed to be the oldest student to have registered at Oxford. Although she failed to complete her DPhil, she was awarded a certificate of graduate attainment in 2011.

Ronald Dworkin

11 December 1931 – 14 February 2013

The legal philosopher Ronald Dworkin FBA died on 14 February 2013, aged 81. Born in Worcester, Massachusetts, he was brought up by his mother, a music teacher, his parents having separated. He won a scholarship to Harvard, and then went to Magdalen College, Oxford, as a Rhodes Scholar, here he read Jurisprudence, graduating in 1955. After Harvard Law School he worked as a clerk to Judge Learned Hand and practised on Wall Street before joining the teaching staff of Yale Law School, where he was made a professor in 1965. From 1969 to 1998 he was Professor of Jurisprudence at Oxford, and a fellow of University College. He then moved to University College London, where he was successively Quain Professor of Jurisprudence (1998-2004) then Bentham Professor of Jurisprudence (2004-8). He was elected an FBA in 1979. He was noted in particular for his belief that law should be seen as ‘a branch of morality’. Among his many influential books were Taking Rights Seriously (1977), Law’s Empire (1986), and Justice in Robes (2006). He also wrote frequently for the New York Review of Books and other papers. He was survived by his wife Irene (widow of the pianist Alfred Brendel) and by the two children of his first marriage.

Patricia Birnie

17 November 1926 – 7 February 2013

Patricia Winifred Birnie, legal scholar, died on 7 February 2013, aged 86. Born in Lancashire, she was educated at Queen Mary School in Lytham St Annes, and St Hilda’s College, Oxford, where she read jurisprudence and played cricket for the university. She was called to the bar in 1952 and worked for a few years in the civil service, but following her marriage to Sandy Birnie she moved with him to Scotland, where she began teaching law at the universities of Aberdeen and Edinburgh. She completed an Edinburgh PhD on the international law of whaling, and subsequently became an internationally recognised authority on international environmental law. From 1983 to 1989 she taught at the LSE, where she developed a new LLM course on international environmental law. She was then founding director of the International Maritime Law Institute in Malta until 1994. She was survived by her three children, her husband having predeceased her.

Canon Keith Weston

30 July 1926 – 5 February 2013

Canon Keith Aitken Astley Weston, rector of St Ebbe’s, Oxford, from 1964 to 1985, died on 5 February 2013, aged 86. The son of Sir Arthur Weston, lawyer and civil servant, he was educated at Merchant Taylors’ School and, after service as a captain in the Royal Artillery in Italy and Palestine, Trinity Hall, Cambridge, where he read French and German. He trained for the ministry at Ridley Hall, Cambridge, and was ordained in Bath Abbey in 1953. He held curacies at Weston-super-Mare and Cheltenham before becoming vicar of Christ Church, Clevedon, in 1959, moving to Oxford five years later. He was rural dean of Oxford from 1971 to 1976 and a canon of Christ Church Cathedral from 1981 to 1985. A gifted evangelical preacher, he was much involved in the Universities and Colleges Christian Fellowship, of which he was president in 1987-8. After leaving Oxford he was diocesan director of ordinands for Norwich diocese, and vicar of St Stephen’s, Norwich. He retired to Thame in 1991, but continued to preach until his final year. He was survived by his wife Margaret and their four children.

Sir Michael Connell

6 August 1939 – 30 January 2013

The High Court judge Sir Michael Bryan Connell QC died on 30 January 2013, aged 73. The son of Lorraine Connell, the founder of Connell’s estate agency, he was educated at Harrow School and Brasenose College, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence, graduating in 1961. He was called to the bar by the Inner Temple the following year. He built a substantial reputation and practice in family law, and took silk in 1981. A recorder from 1980 to 1991, he served as a judge in the Family Division of the High Court from then until taking early retirement for health reasons in 2002. He was awarded the customary knighthood on joining the High Court. Throughout his life he was a keen and successful horse rider, and later owner and breeder; in 1993 he led the inquiry into the Grand National fiasco, when the race was allowed to continue despite a declared false start (with the result that bookmakers had to refund £75 million in bets). He was survived by his wife Anne and their four children.

Marius Gray

3 August 1934 – 29 January 2013

(Stephen) Marius Gray CVO, chartered accountant, died on 29 January 2013, aged 78. The eldest child of Basil Gray, Keeper of Oriental Antiquities at the British Museum, and of Nicolete Gray, a pioneering historian of lettering, he was educated at Westminster School and New College, Oxford, where he read Literae Humaniores, graduating in 1958. After training as a chartered accountant he joined the City firm of Dixon Wilson, where he remained until his retirement in 1998, for the last seventeen years as senior partner. In 1978 he was junior author of the Bingham Report on the operation of oil sanctions against Rhodesia. He was for many years an adviser to Lord Rothermere and the Daily Mail and General Trust, and sat on numerous company boards. He also chaired the management committee of the King’s Fund, and was a trustee of the London Library. He was survived by his wife Clare and their four children.

David Watts

23 December 1912 – 29 January 2013

David Earp Watts, headmaster of Kingsmead School, Hoylake, died on 29 January 2013, aged 100. The eldest son of Arthur Watts, founder of Kingsmead School, he was educated at Sutton Valence School and St Peter’s Hall, Oxford, where he switched from Mathematics to Geography, graduating in 1935. He taught for two years at Liverpool College before becoming senior geography master at Diocesan College, Rondebosch, South Africa. He served during the Second World War as a meteorological officer in the Royal Navy, based mainly in Durban. Demobilised as a lieutenant commander, he returned to Diocesan College but in 1949 was persuaded by his father to take over the headmastership of Kingsmead School, initially jointly with his brother Gordon. He retired in 1979. A keen cricketer and ornithologist, he was survived by his wife Dorothy and their three children.

Acer Nethercott

28 November 1977 – 26 January 2013

Acer Gary Nethercott, rowing cox and philosopher, died on 26 January 2013, aged 35. Born in Newmarket, he was educated at Mark Hall Comprehensive in Harlow, The Broxbourne School, and University College, Oxford, where he read Physics and Philosophy, and won the Gibbs Prize in Philosophy. After a year teaching mathematics in America, he returned to Oxford, where he took his BPhil in 2003 and his DPhil in 2008, the latter for a thesis on the semantics of complex demonstratives. He coxed the Oxford women’s crew to Boat Race victory in 2000, and the successful Oxford Boat Race crews in 2003 and 2005. In 2008 he coxed the GB men’s eight to a silver medal in the Beijing Olympics, losing to Canada by half a length. Soon after this he was diagnosed with a brain tumour, which he fought with courage and humour.

Jonathan Rendall

11 June 1964 – 23 January 2013

The journalist and author Jonathan David Rendall died on 23 January 2013, aged 48. The adopted son of a bookseller, he was brought up partly in Greece, but educated in England, at Downsend Preparatory School, St John’s School in Leatherhead, and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. He wrote mainly for The Times and The Observer, including latterly a column about drinking for The Observer, entitled ‘The Last Chance Saloon’. His first book, This Bloody Mary is the Last Thing I Own (1998), was an acclaimed book about boxing; his second, Twelve Grand (2000), was a sometimes surreal account of his gambling habit. Garden Hopping (2006) recounted his search for and reunion with his birth mother. He was often compared to Jeffrey Bernard and Hunter S. Thompson. He was survived by the three children of his marriage, which ended in divorce.

John Poole

29 March 1932 – 21 January 2013

John B. Poole, chemist and Senior Librarian of the House of Commons, died on 21 January 2013, aged 80. The son of a miner, he was educated at the High Pavement School in Nottingham and Keble College, Oxford, where he read Chemistry, graduating in 1956. He moved to Leeds, where he worked under Dr Leonard Reed (a leading expert on leather and parchment) and in 1960 obtained his PhD for a thesis on the dating of the Dead Sea Scrolls. He worked briefly for the Chemical Society, Shell, and Roskill Mineral Research before in 1966 becoming a Senior Librarian at the House of Commons, where his broad-ranging scientific knowledge was much valued. He retired in 1990. He and his wife Mary had one son.

Richard Thornton

5 July 1931 – 21 January 2013

Richard Chicheley Thornton, investment manager, died on 21 January 2013, aged 81. The son of a naval officer, he was educated at Stowe School and Keble College, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence. After graduating in 1955 he read for the bar but was diverted into a business career, working first in insurance, and then in investment. He joined the Foreign & Colonial Investment Trust in 1962, but in 1969 he left to found, with Tom Griffin, GT Management, which became a highly successful international fund manager, with particular strengths in the Far East. In 1982 he moved on, to establish Thornton & Co., which again prospered; a controlling stake was acquired by Dresdner Bank in 1988 and Thornton retired as chairman in 1991. He was a noted philanthropist. He was survived by his wife Susie and the three children of his first marriage.

Denys Hodson

23 May 1928 – 13 January 2013

Denys Fraser Hodson CBE, arts administrator, died on 13 January 2013, aged 84. Born in Gloucestershire, the son of a vicar, he was educated at Marlborough College, and, after national service with the Palestine Police in Jerusalem, Trinity College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. After graduating in 1951 he worked in management for Imperial Tobacco, Coleman Prentice & Varley (where he named a chocolate biscuit ‘Bandit’), Spirella, and Chester Barrie, before moving into arts administration, as the first controller of arts and recreation for Swindon Borough Council from 1970. He held this job (re-named director of arts and recreation, Thamesdown Borough Council) until his retirement in 1992, overseeing a much-admired arts programme as well as the development of world-class sporting facilities. He was involved with many regional and national arts organisations, including as a director of Oxford Playhouse from 1974 to 1986 and vice-chairman of the Arts Council from 1989 to 1994. He was survived by two children, his wife Julie having predeceased him.

Robert Kee

5 October 1919 – 11 January 2013

The journalist and broadcaster Robert Kee CBE died on 11 January 2013. Born in Calcutta, he was educated at Stowe School and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. He joined the Royal Air Force in 1940, but on a bombing mission in 1942 was shot down over Germany and spent the next three years as a prisoner of war. After publishing the first of a series of novels (he also wrote many non-fiction books, including several on Ireland, as well as producing many translations from German), he joined the Picture Post under Tom Hopkinson. He subsequently worked as a reporter for several national papers but was better known as a television reporter, initially for Panorama (which he joined in 1958) and then for a wide variety of BBC, ITV and Channel 4 current affairs programmes. He was survived by his third wife, Catherine, the daughter of his first marriage, and two of the three children of his second marriage.

Ted Cooke-Yarborough

25 December 1918 – 10 January 2013

Edmund (Ted) Cooke-Yarborough, electronics engineer, died on 10 January 2013, aged 94. Born in Yorkshire, he was educated at Canford School, Dorset, and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read Physics, graduating in 1940. He was immediately seconded to work on radar in Dundee and then the Telecommunications Research Establishment, Swanage. After the war he was involved in interrogating German scientists, then in 1946 joined the UK Atomic Energy programme, playing a key role in the design and operation of the Harwell Dekatron computer, operational from 1951. He became head of Harwell’s electronics division in 1957 and chief research scientist from 1980 until his retirement in 1982. He was survived by two children, his wife Anthea having predeceased him.

Alasdair Milne

8 October 1930 – 8 January 2013

Alasdair Gordon Milne, Director-General of the BBC from 1982 to 1987, died on 8 January 2013, aged 82. Born in India, the son of a Scottish surgeon, he was educated at Winchester College and New College, Oxford, where he took classical moderations but switched to French and Italian, graduating in 1954. He joined the BBC, working his way up to become editor of the Tonight programme then, after a short spell at JBM Productions (with Tony Jay and Donald Baverstock), Controller, BBC Scotland (1968-72), Director of Programmes (1973-7), Managing Director (1977-82) and Deputy Director-General (1980-2). Under his direction the BBC was frequently criticised by the Conservative government; he also lost the confidence of the BBC governors, and became the first Director-General to be sacked, in 1987. (He was also the first not to be knighted.) He published his memoirs in 1988. He was survived by his three children, his wife Sheila having predeceased him.

Gwendoline Butler

19 August 1922 – 5 January 2013

The crime novelist Gwendoline Butler (née Williams) died on 5 January 2013, aged 90. Born in Deptford, the daughter of a Thames waterman, she was educated at Haberdashers’ Aske’s Girls’ School, New Cross (evacuated during the war to Teignmouth in Devon) and Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, where she read Modern History, graduating in 1947. She married Lionel Butler, then a Fellow of All Souls, later Professor of Medieval History at the University of St Andrews then principal of Royal Holloway College, University of London. In 1958 she published the first of more than seventy crime novels, some of them under her grandmother’s name, Jennie Melville. Her books were highly successful and translated into several languages. In 1974 she won the Crime Writers’ Association’s coveted Silver Dagger Award. She was survived by her daughter, her husband having predeceased her.

Mary McIntosh

13 March 1936 – 5 January 2013

The sociologist Mary Susan McIntosh died on 5 January 2013, aged 76. Born in Hampstead, the sister of the Labour politician Andrew McIntosh (Lord McIntosh of Haringey), she was educated at High Wycombe School and St Anne’s College, Oxford, where she read Philosophy, Politics and Economics. After graduating in 1958 she studied at the University of California at Berkeley, but was deported in 1960 for her part in organising protests. She worked briefly for the Home Office Research Unit before returning to academia, as a lecturer at the University of Leicester, then Borough Polytechnic, a research fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford (1972-5), and finally professor at the University of Essex, where she remained until her retirement in 1996. She was a key figure in the early Gay Liberation Front, and subsequently in the lesbian and gay movement; her published work focused on the sociology of gender and sexuality, but she was also noted as a sociologist of crime. She was survived by her partner, Angela Stewart-Park.

Lady Brown

23 May 1928 – 3 January 2013

Elizabeth, Lady Brown (née Elizabeth Gittings), linguist, died on 3 January 2013, aged 84. Born in Shipley, Derbyshire, the daughter of a mining engineer, she was educated at the grammar school in Heanor and St Hilda’s College, Oxford, where she read French, graduating in 1949. Later that year she married Mervyn, later Sir Mervyn, Brown, diplomat, and she accompanied him on his many subsequent varied postings. Meanwhile she studied piano, performing as an accompanist, and setting poems by her friend, the diplomat Peter Vereker, to music; their work ‘The Charm Parade’ was performed at the Wigmore Hall in 2003 (after Vereker’s death). She was survived by her husband.