R. S. Peters

31 October 1919 – 30 December 2011

The philosopher Richard Stanley (R. S.) Peters died on 30 December 2011, aged 92. Born in India, he was educated at Clifton College and The Queen’s College, Oxford. He took Classical Moderations in 1940 but was then called up for war service, which he spent in the Friends Ambulance Unit and doing youth work in the East End. He then taught classics while studying part-time for a philosophy degree at Birkbeck College, University of London. He became a lecturer in philosophy and psychology at Birkbeck in 1949, moving to the University of London’s Institute of Education in 1962 as Professor of the Philosophy of Education, until his retirement in 1982. His best known works included Ethics and Education (1966) and, with Paul Hirst, The Logic of Education (1970). He founded and was the first chair of the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain, and was the first editor of its Proceedings and of its successor, the Journal of Philosophy of Education. He was survived by three children, his wife Margaret and his later partner, Mary Killick, having predeceased him.

Sir Michael Dummett

27 June 1925 – 27 December 2011

Sir Michael Anthony Eardley Dummett FBA, Wykeham Professor of Logic in the University of Oxford from 1979 to 1992, died on 27 December 2011, aged 86. Born in London, he was educated at Winchester College and, after service in the Royal Artillery and Intelligence Corps, Christ Church, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics. He graduated in 1950 and the same year was elected to a prize fellowship at All Souls. Apart from a year teaching Philosophy at Birmingham, his entire career was spent in Oxford, at All Souls until 1979 and then at New College as Wykeham Professor. His work ranged widely, from analytical philosophy to tarot, but he was also well known as a campaigner against racism and apartheid. He was twice elected a Fellow of the British Academy, in 1968 and 1995, having resigned in 1984 in protest at its failure to respond more vigorously to the higher education cuts imposed by Mrs Thatcher’s government. He was knighted in 1999. He was survived by his wife Ann, former director of the Runnymede Trust, and five of their seven children.

Martin Isepp

30 September 1930 – 25 December 2011

The pianist, music coach and conductor Martin Johannes Sebastian Isepp died on 25 December 2001, aged 81. Born in Vienna, the son of a picture restorer, he arrived in London with his family as a refugee in the late 1930s. He was educated at St Paul’s School, Lincoln College, Oxford (where he was an active musician in the University Opera Club and other music societies, but failed to take a degree), and the Royal College of Music. After national service he worked with the English Opera Group, then joined the staff of Glyndebourne, with which he would be associated, in different roles, for fifty years. He taught at the Juilliard School, New York, the Banff School of Fine Arts, the National Opera Studio, and the Britten-Pears School, as well as on summer schools, and acted as a music coach for many well-known names in opera. He also excelled as an accompanist, forging a particularly acclaimed partnership with Janet Baker. He was survived by his wife Rose and two of their three sons.

Philip Lawley

4 July 1927 – 18 December 2011

The chemist Philip Lawley died on 18 December 2011, aged 84. Born in Staffordshire, the son of teachers, he was educated at Burton-on-Trent Grammar School, University College, Oxford (where he read Chemistry, graduating in 1949), and Nottingham University, where he completed a PhD in 1953. At the Chester Beatty Research Institute (subsequently the Institute of Cancer Research), Chiswick, and at the Institute’s research station at Pollards Wood, Buckinghamshire, he and his colleague Peter Brookes conducted pioneering work which provided the first evidence that DNA is the key target for cancer-causing chemicals, thereby laying the foundation for the realisation that DNA damage is the basic cause of cancer. From 1983 to 1992 he was Professor of Chemical Carcinogenesis at the University of London; following his formal retirement he continued to work at the ICR laboratory in Sutton, Surrey. In 2003 a building there was named after him and Brookes. He was survived by his wife Pauline and their three children.

Christopher Hitchens

13 April 1949 – 15 December 2011

The journalist and author Christopher Eric Hitchens died on 15 December 2011, aged 62. Born in Portsmouth, he was educated at the Leys School, Cambridge, and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics. After graduating he worked as a freelance journalist in London before moving to the United States in 1981, where he became well known as a controversialist. A student Trotskyist, in later life he moved politically from far Left to far Right (without ever identifying with the liberal Centre), and became a prominent supporter of George W. Bush’s ‘war on terror’. He was also well known as a combative atheist and a debunker of such icons as Mother Teresa and Diana, Princess of Wales. He was survived by his wife Carol, their daughter, and the two children of his first marriage.

John Gardner

2 March 1917 – 12 December 2011

The composer John Linton Gardner CBE died on 12 December 2011, aged 94. Born in Manchester, he was educated at Wellington College and Exeter College, Oxford, where he was an organ scholar and enjoyed the distinction of having some of his compositions published by Oxford University Press. After graduating he taught briefly at Repton School before wartime service with the RAF. Postwar he combined composition with teaching, at Morley College, the Royal Academy of Music, and St Paul’s Girls’ School. He wrote three symphonies, six operas, and a large number of concertos and chamber works, but was probably best known for his Christmas carol, ‘Tomorrow Shall Be My Dancing Day’. His melodic, tuneful approach fell out of critical favour in the 1960s, but at the time of his death there was renewed interest in his work. He was survived by his three children, his wife Jane having predeceased him.

Sir Zelman Cowen

7 October 1919 – 8 December 2011

Sir Zelman Cowen AK, GCMG, GCVO, PC, Governor-General of Australia from 1977 to 1982 and Provost of Oriel College, Oxford, from 1982 to 1990, died on 8 December 2011, aged 92. Born in Melbourne, he entered the University of Melbourne at the age of sixteen and at nineteen, after graduating, became a tutor in political philosophy. During the Second World War he served in the Royal Australian Navy, then won a Rhodes Scholarship to New College, Oxford. He was awarded a BCL in 1947 and was immediately appointed a tutor in constitutional law at Oriel College. In 1951 he returned to Melbourne as Professor of Public Law. He was Vice-Chancellor of the University of New England in Armidale, New South Wales (1967-70), then of Queensland University (1970-7), before becoming Governor-General. He was widely viewed as a success in this role, after a period of political controversy under his predecessor. As Provost of Oriel College he presided over the admission of women and was a successful fundraiser. He was knighted in 1976. In 1997 he declared himself in favour of an Australian republic. He was survived by his wife Anna and their four children.

Anthony Sutcliffe

28 September 1942 – 5 December 2011

Anthony Richard Sutcliffe, urban historian, died on 5 December 2012, aged 69. Born in London, he was educated at Chigwell School, Merton College, Oxford (where he read Modern History, graduating in 1963), and the Sorbonne. His doctoral thesis was published, to critical acclaim, as The Autumn of Paris: The Defeat of Town Planning, 1850-1970 (1970). He went on to publish numerous books on urban, planning and architectural history, including Paris: An Architectural History (1993) and London: An Architectural History (2000). His academic career took him from the University of Birmingham via Sheffield University (where he became a professor in 1982) to the University of Leicester, where he was professor from 1988 to 1997. He was survived by two children, his marriage having ended in divorce.

Lord Rockley

5 April 1934 – 5 December 2011

James Hugh Cecil, third Baron Rockley, merchant banker, died on 5 December 2011, aged 77. He was educated at Eton College and, after national service, New College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics. Graduating in 1957, he spent five years in Canada with the investment bank Wood Grundy & Co, before returning to London to join Kleinwort Benson. Having succeeded his father as Lord Rockley in 1976, he became a director of Kleinwort Benson in 1986 and served as vice-chairman from 1989 to 1993 and chairman from 1993 to 1996, when he stepped down following its acquisition by the Dresdner Bank. He held many other directorships, was a trustee of the National Portrait Gallery, and chaired the City panel of the Great Ormond Street Wishing Well Appeal. He was a keen gardener at his estate, Lytchett Heath in Dorset. He was survived by his wife Sarah (eldest daughter of the seventh Earl Cadogan) and three children.

Philip Mallet

3 February 1926 – 1 December 2011

The diplomat Philip Louis Victor Mallet CMG died on 1 December 2011, aged 85. The son of the diplomat Sir Victor Mallet, he was educated at Winchester College and, after war service with the army, Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics. He joined the Foreign Service in 1949; fluent in Arabic, French, German, and Swedish, his postings included Baghdad, Cyprus, Aden, Tunis, Khartoum, Stockholm, and finally Georgetown, where he ended his career as High Commissioner to Guyana. He was a keen ornithologist and botanist, and in retirement from 1980 ran the family apple farm in Kent. He was survived by his wife Mary and their three sons.

Jon Driver

4 July 1962 – 28 November 2011

Jonathon Stevens (Jon) Driver FBA, FMedSci, cognitive neuroscientist, died on 28 November 2011, aged 49. The son of a mathematician, he was educated at Hymers College, Hull, and The Queen’s College, Oxford, where he read Experimental Psychology. He stayed on to take a DPhil in 1988, on selective attention. He was then a lecturer in Oregon and Cambridge, and at Birkbeck College, University of London, and finally University College London, where he was director of the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience from 2004 to 2009. He was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2008, and in 2009 was awarded a Royal Society Anniversary Research Professorship. He committed suicide ten months after shattering his knee in a motorcycle accident, which left him unable to work. He was survived by his wife Nilli, also a psychologist, and their two sons.

Emeka Ojukwu

4 November 1933 – 26 November 2011

Chukwuemeka Odumegwe (Emeka) Ojukwu, leader of the Biafran secessionist movement during the Nigerian civil war of 1967-70, died on 26 November 2011, aged 78. The son of a wealthy businessman, he was educated at King’s College, Lagos, Epsom College, Surrey, and Lincoln College, Oxford, where he read Modern History and was remembered for his bright red MG sports car. After graduating in 1955 he joined the Colonial Civil Service, serving in eastern Nigeria as an assistant district officer. In 1957 he resigned and joined the army. After independence in 1960 he rose through the ranks swiftly to become military commander of the Eastern Region. Following the coup led by Yakubu Gowon and the subsequent massacres of Ibo civilians by Northern troops, in 1967 he declared an independent Democratic Republic of Biafra, which was suppressed after three years and enormous loss of life. In 1970 he fled to the Ivory Coast, but in 1982 he returned to Nigeria, where he was imprisoned by the Buhari regime but collaborated with the Abacha regime; following the return of democracy he was unsuccessful in his two presidential election bids. He spent his last months in a Kensington nursing home and was survived by his wife Bianca and their children.

John Hart

30 September 1936 – 15 November 2011

John Hart, classics master, quiz champion, and party to a notable legal case, died on 15 November 2011, aged 75. Born in Oxford, the son of a primary school headmaster, he was educated at Rugby School and St John’s College, Oxford. Graduating in Literae Humaniores in 1960, he taught classics at Stonyhurst College then, for more than thirty years, Malvern College. He won the television quiz show Mastermind in 1975. As a result of his disputing the Inland Revenue’s interpretation of taxable benefits in relation to his children’s subsidised education at Malvern, in 1992 he was party to a landmark case in the House of Lords (Pepper v Hart) in which, by taking into consideration the debates in Parliament during the passage of the relevant legislation, the Lords overturned an ancient principle that judges should not refer to ‘extra-statutory’ sources when interpreting the law. He was a keen cricketer and musician, an active Freemason, and a noted after-dinner speaker. He was survived by his wife Sally and their four children.

Sir Robin Mountfield

16 October 1939 – 9 November 2011

Sir Robin Mountfield KCB, civil servant, died on 9 November 2011, aged 72. Born in Liverpool, the son of the general manager of the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board, he was educated at Merchant Taylors’ School and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. Graduating in 1961, he joined the civil service, rising to be Permanent Secretary at the Cabinet Office in 1998-9. In 1998 he wrote the ‘Mountfield Report’ on the Government Information Service, which led to several stand-offs with the Prime Minister’s Press Secretary, Alastair Campbell. He also claimed to have invented the term ‘joined-up government’. He was survived by his wife Anne and their three children.

Kevin Sharpe

26 January 1949 – 5 November 2011

The historian Kevin Michael Sharpe died on 5 November 2011, aged 62. The son of a crane operator, he was educated at Sir Joseph Williamson’s School, Rochester, and St Catherine’s College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. He stayed on to take a DPhil in 1975, on the antiquary Sir Robert Cotton, and then as a junior research fellow at Oriel College. From 1978 to 2001 he taught at Southampton University (being appointed Professor of History in 1994); in 2001 he moved to the University of Warwick, and in 2005 to Queen Mary, University of London. He made a name for himself as a ‘revisionist’ historian. Among a string of books on Tudor and Stuart politics were The Personal Rule of Charles I (1992), which challenged existing interpretations by demonstrating the success of Charles’s rule in the 1630s, and a trilogy of books on representations of Tudor, Stuart, and Commonwealth authority (the final volume completed but not published at the time of his death). He had a succession of intense relationships but never married.

Sir Timothy Raison

3 November 1929 – 3 November 2011

The Conservative politician Sir Timothy Hugh Francis Raison PC died on 3 November 2011, his 82nd birthday. The son of a publisher, he was educated at Eton College and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read Modern History. After graduating in 1952 he worked for the Picture Post and New Scientist, before becoming founding editor of New Society from 1962 to 1968. From 1970 to 1992 he was MP for Aylesbury. A ‘One Nation’ Tory, he served as a junior minister at the Home and Foreign offices under Margaret Thatcher, but was never in sympathy with her version of Conservatism. He was knighted in 1991 and served as chairman of the Advertising Standards Authority from 1991 to 1994. He was survived by his wife Veldes and four children.

Jane Moody

13 May 1967 – 28 October 2011

The theatre scholar Jane Moody died on 28 October 2011, aged 44. Educated at Wakefield Girls’ High School and St Edmund Hall, Oxford, where she read English, she was an adviser to women at Oriel College, Oxford, then a research fellow at Girton College, Cambridge, before joining the Department of English and Related Literature at the University of York in 1997. She was appointed to a personal chair in 2004, and became director of the university’s Humanities Research Centre. Her own research focused on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century popular theatre. She was also active as a broadcaster. She was survived by her husband Gregory Kucich, of the University of Notre Dame, Illinois.

Rüdiger von Pachelbel

29 April 1926 – 27 October 2011

Wolf-Rüdiger von Pachelbel-Gehag, German diplomat, and the first postwar German undergraduate to study at Oxford, died on 27 October 2011, aged 85. Descended from Pomeranian nobility, he studied at Hamburg University and then (with a scholarship organised by Lionel Curtis) St Edmund Hall, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, was President of the (Euro-enthusiast) Oxford Strasbourg Club, and was among the group which welcomed Konrad Adenauer to Oxford in 1951. After graduating in 1952 he spent some time at Harvard before joining the German diplomatic service. He was press spokesman in London from 1958 to 1963, and later ambassador to Lebanon, Ethiopia, Greece, and Denmark. After retiring in 1991 he divided his time between Munich and a hilltop fortress in Tuscany.

Collin Bowen

5 December 1919 – 25 October 2011

The archaeologist (Harries) Collin Bowen OBE died on 25 October 2011, aged 91. The son of an excise officer, he was educated at Christ College, Brecon, and Merton College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. His education was interrupted by war service with the Royal Welch Fusiliers (including as aide to the commander of the Channel Islands reoccupation force). Graduating in 1948, he joined the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England, with whom he remained for his entire career, overseeing the research which led to a monumental four-volume survey of the archaeological sites of Dorset, and volumes on the Iron Age and Roman Cotswolds and the archaeology of the Bokerley Dyke Area. His book Ancient Fields (1961) was regarded as a classic. He was survived by his wife Margaret and their three children.

Peter Goldie

5 November 1946 – 22 October 2011

Peter Lawrence Goldie, financier and philosopher, died on 22 October 2011, aged 64. He was educated at Felsted School, Essex, and qualified as a chartered accountant before joining the merchant bank Guinness Mahon. He subsequently set up, with Cameron Brown, Brown Goldie, which was absorbed in turn by Greencoat Properties, Abaco Investments, and British and Commonwealth, of each of which Goldie became chief executive. British and Commonwealth collapsed following its acquisition of Atlantic Computers in 1988. A DTI investigation into lack of due diligence led to Goldie being disqualified as a director for five years. Meanwhile, in 1990 he had begun a second career as a philosopher, studying at University College, London, and then Balliol College, Oxford; in 1997 he was awarded a DPhil for a thesis on ‘Emotion, mood and character’. He was a lecturer a Magdalen College, Oxford, from 1996 to 1998 before moving to King’s College, London, and then the University of Manchester, where he became a professor in 2005. He married twice, and had two sons.

Lord Bathurst

1 May 1927 – 16 October 2011

Henry Allen John Bathurst, eighth Earl Bathurst, died on 16 October 2011, aged 84. He was educated at Ridley College, St Catharine’s, Ontario, then Eton College, and, having succeeded his grandfather as Earl Bathurst in 1943, Christ Church, Oxford, following national service as an officer in the 10th Royal Hussars. Subsequently he devoted himself to the management of his estate, Cirencester Park, where he founded Cirencester Park Polo and was much involved in local charities. A Conservative, he was briefly a parliamentary under-secretary of state in Harold Macmillan’s government. He was twice married and had three children.

Tony Marchington

2 December 1955 – 16 October 2011

The chemist, businessman and steam engine enthusiast Anthony Frank (Tony) Marchington died on 16 October 2011, aged 55. Born in Buxton, Derbyshire, he was educated at New Mills School and Brasenose College, Oxford, where he graduated in Chemistry in 1976 and three years later gained his DPhil. He then joined ICI, but in 1988 co-founded and became managing director of Oxford Molecular, the biotechnology and chemical information company. The company was sold in 2000, and he subsequently became chief executive of Oxford Medical Diagnostics. A steam enthusiast from an early age, in 1996 he bought the Flying Scotsman and spent £1 million restoring the locomotive, but was forced to sell it in 2004. He was survived by his wife Caroline, their two children, and the two sons of his first marriage.

Stanley Mitchell

12 March 1932 – 16 October 2011

The Russian scholar and translator Stanley Mitchell died on 16 October 2011, aged 79. Born in the East End, he was educated at Christ’s College, Finchley, and, after national service, Lincoln College, Oxford, where he read Russian and German and graduated in 1956. A peripatetic academic career then took him to the universities of Birmingham and Essex, Camberwell School of Art, the University of California at San Diego, and the University of Dar es Salaam. His verse translation of Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin, published by Penguin in 2008, won him many admirers. He was survived by his close friend Barbara Rosenbaum; his wife Hannah, with whom he had two children, predeceased him.

Iain Sproat

8 November 1938 – 29 September 2011

The Conservative politician Iain MacDonald Sproat died on 29 September 2011, aged 72. The son of William Sproat, headmaster of St Mary’s School, Melrose, he was educated there, and at Winchester College, the University of Aix-en-Provence, and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read English. Graduating in 1962, he worked as a journalist before becoming MP for Aberdeen South (1970-83) then, after an enforced but lucrative spell in the City, Harwich (1992-97). He was a junior trade minister under Margaret Thatcher and a sports minister under John Major, but had the reputation of a maverick. He was a fervent opponent of devolution and a scourge of social security ‘scroungers’. He wrote books on parliamentary humour and on P.G. Wodehouse, edited the first Cricketers’ Who’s Who, and organised and funded the fifteen-volume English translation of the complete works of Alexander Pushkin. He was survived by his wife Judy (a parliamentary reporter) and a stepson.

Sir George Moseley

7 February 1925 – 28 September 2011

The civil servant Sir George Walker Moseley KCB died on 28 September 2011, aged 76. Born in Glasgow, he was educated at the High School of Glasgow, St Bees School, Cumberland, and (after service in the RAF from 1943 to 1948) Wadham College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics and graduated in 1950. It was on Sir Maurice Bowra’s advice that he joined the civil service, initially in the Ministry of Town and Country Planning. From 1981 to 1985 he was Permanent Secretary of the Department of the Environment. In retirement he was Chairman of the Trustees of the Civic Trust, and of the British Cement Association. He was survived by his wife Madge and the two children of his first marriage.

Bede Rundle

21 February 1937 – 24 September 2011

Bede Rundle, philosopher and fellow of Trinity College, Oxford, died on 24 September 2011, aged 74. Born in Wellington, New Zealand, he was educated at St Patrick’s College, Wellington, the Victoria University of Wellington, and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he took a BPhil in 1961. After a junior research fellowship he became a tutorial fellow in Philosophy at Trinity College in 1963, remaining there until 2004, when he was made an emeritus fellow. Among his books were Grammar in Philosophy (1979), Mind in Action (1997), and Why There is Something Rather than Nothing (2004), which led to a television series. He was survived by his wife Rosalind and their two children.

Jonathan Cecil

22 February 1939 – 22 September 2011

The actor Jonathan Hugh Gascoyne-Cecil, known as Jonathan Cecil, died on 22 September 2011, aged 72. The son of the Oxford English don and biographer Lord David Cecil, he was educated at Eton and New College, Oxford, where he read French and appeared in cabaret with Dudley Moore and Alan Bennett. After graduating in 1961 he trained at LAMDA and worked on the repertory circuit before gaining a foothold both in the West End and on television. For the next forty years he was in constant demand; he was most famous for his comic portrayals of upper-class buffoons (based in part, he said, on his former school-fellows), but he also won acclaim in ‘straight’ roles. A brilliant raconteur and a colourful personality, he was also a thoughtful book reviewer and an erudite historian of British music hall and popular theatre. He was survived by his wife Anna.

Mansur Ali Khan Pataudi

5 January 1941 – 22 September 2011

Mansur Ali Khan PataudiMansur Ali Khan Pataudi, cricketer, died on 22 September 2011, aged 60. The son of Iftikhar Ali Khan Pataudi, Nawab of Pataudi, who played for both England and India, he was educated at Lockers Park Prep School, Hertfordshire, then (having in 1952 succeeded his father as Nawab of Pataudi, by which name he was known until 1971, when India abolished royal entitlements) Winchester College, and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Arabic and French. He made his debut as a county player at the age of sixteen (for Sussex), and captained the Oxford team, for whom he scored centuries in three consecutive first-class matches. Despite losing an eye in a car accident, he went on to captain India on numerous tours between 1961 and 1974; a graceful batsman, in 1964 he made a memorable 203 not out against England in Delhi. In 1968 he was Wisden Cricketer of the Year and in 2010 the MCC commissioned the Pataudi Trophy for the England-India series. He was survived by his wife Sharmila Tagore (the actress) and their three children.

Sir Brian Burnett

10 March 1913 – 16 September 2011

Air Chief Marshal Sir Brian Kenyon Burnett GCB, RAF officer and chairman of the All England Lawn Tennis Club, died on 16 September 2011, aged 98. Born in India, where his father was principal of Nizam College, Hyderabad, he was educated at Charterhouse, Heidelberg University, and Wadham College, Oxford, where he read German and French and gained blues in squash and tennis. On graduation he joined the RAF, and in 1938 was navigator and second pilot of a Wellesley bomber which flew non-stop from Ismailia (Egypt) to Darwin (Australia), taking just over 48 hours; he was awarded the AFC the following year. He served in Bomber Command during the Second World War, earning a DFC in 1942. Remaining in the RAF, he was knighted in 1965 and ended his career as the last Commander-in-Chief, Far East Command, in 1970-1. He was chairman of the All England Lawn Tennis Club from 1974 to 1983, in which capacity he presided over the Wimbledon Championships and was frequently called upon to defuse tensions between players and the club’s officials. In 2009 he published his memoirs, A Pilot at Wimbledon. He was survived by his two sons, his wife Valerie having predeceased him.

Ray Boyfield

31 March 1916 – 15 September 2011

Ray Boyfield OBE, trade unionist, died on 15 September 2011, aged 95. Born in Stamford, Lincolnshire, he went to Stamford School and, as a scholar, Lincoln College, Oxford, where he read Modern History, graduating in 1938. During the Second World War he served with the RAF: he trained as a pilot, but after failing an eye test was assigned to ground duties. He joined the TUC in 1946. He became one of the key officials, and was tipped to succeed George Woodcock, but in 1966 left to become industrial relations adviser to IPC. In 1972 he became a member of the National Industrial Relations Court, which was boycotted by the TUC. He was subsequently active in the Institute of Personnel Management. He was survived by his wife, Hilary, and daughter, Diane.

Ian Dunlop

19 August 1925 – 10 September 2011

Canon Ian Geoffrey David Dunlop, chancellor of Salisbury Cathedral and historian, died on 10 September 2011, aged 86. Born in India, the son of a judge, he was educated at Winchester College and, after war service in the Irish Guards, New College, Oxford, where he read Modern History, graduating in 1948. He trained as a priest at Lincoln Theological College, and after serving in Hatfield, as chaplain at Westminster School, and as vicar of Bures, Suffolk, he was from 1972 to 1992 canon and chancellor of Salisbury Cathedral. For twenty years he wrote a much-quoted column for the Church Times, and he was the author of numerous books on French history, including biographies of Marie-Antoinette and Louis XIV and studies of the chateaux, royal palaces, and cathedrals of France. He was survived by his wife Deirdre and their two children.

Mark Blackburn

5 January 1953 – 1 September 2011

The numismatist Mark Alistair Sinclair Blackburn died on 1 September 2011, aged 58. Educated at Skinners’ School, Tunbridge Wells, he entered St Edmund Hall to read Chemistry, but switched to Jurisprudence, graduating in 1975 and being called to the bar the following year. Neither the bar nor the City satisfied him, and in 1982 he moved to Cambridge as research assistant to the renowned numismatist Philip Grierson. In 1991 he became Keeper of Coins and Medals at the Fitzwilliam Museum. He was appointed a Reader in Numismatics in 1994. His specialism was Anglo-Saxon and Viking coinage, and as general editor from 1987 to 2010 he oversaw the publication of more than thirty volumes of the Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles, but his curatorial responsibilities extended globally, and he made many international connections. He was survived by his wife, Fiona, and their three children.

Matthias Paneth

30 April 1921 – 31 August 2011

The cardiothoracic surgeon Matthias Paneth died on 31 August 2011, aged 90. Born in Amsterdam, the son of a doctor, he was educated at Gordonstoun and Christ Church, Oxford, graduating in physiology in 1943. After war service he worked at the Fulham Hospital, the Royal Cancer Hospital, and the Royal Brompton Hospital. There he maintained the hospital’s reputation for excellence in heart surgery, and pioneered heart surgery on infants. He retired in 1988 but retained his connection with the Royal Brompton Hospital. He was survived by his wife Shirley and their two daughters.

Jan Bannatyne

2 February 1911 – 28 August 2011

Group Officer Janet Arderne (Jan) Bannatyne CBE, RAF officer, died on 28 August 2011, aged 100. Born in Broxbourne, Hertfordshire, she was educated at Malvern Girls’ College and the Society of Hume Students (now St Anne’s College), Oxford, where she read Modern History and graduated in 1933. She then worked for the National Council of Women. In 1939 she joined the WAAF, and served during the Second World War as a codes and cipher officer. After the war she remained in the WAAF and its successor (from 1949) the WRAF, serving in Cyprus and from 1959 as commander of RAF Spitalgate (only the second woman to command an RAF station). She retired in 1964, settling in Bibury, Gloucestershire, where he was active in the Conservative Party and in village life. She never married.

Sir Paul Alfred Reeves

6 December 1932 – 14 August 2011

The Right Reverend Sir Paul Alfred Reeves GCMG, Archbishop of New Zealand from 1980 to 1985 and Governor-General of New Zealand from 1985 to 1990, died on 14 August 2011, aged 78. The son of an English father and Maori mother, he was educated at Wellington College, the Victoria University of Wellington, St John’s Theological College, Auckland, and St Peter’s Hall, Oxford, where he read Theology, graduating in 1961. Following ordination he worked as a priest in Lowestoft and Lambeth before returning to New Zealand, where he became Bishop of Waiapu in 1971. He became Bishop of Auckland in 1979 and Archbishop of New Zealand in 1980. He was known as a Labour supporter, and in 1985 David Lange controversially proposed him as Governor-General; he resigned the archbishopric to take up the office, and served until 1990. He then had an active retirement as, inter alia, Chairman of the Nelson Mandela Trust and Chancellor of Auckland University. He was survived by his wife Beverley and their three daughters.

Sir Donald Farquharson

26 February 1928 – 21 August 2011

Sir Donald Henry Farquharson PC, a Lord Justice of Appeal from 1989 to 1995, died on 21 August 2011, aged 83. Born in Dumfries, the son of a civil engineer, he was brought up in Wanstead and educated at the Royal Commercial Travellers School in Hatch End, and Keble College, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence. He was called to the bar in 1952, and quickly built up a formidable reputation as a criminal barrister. He took silk in 1972 and served as a recorder from 1972 to 1981. Among his high-profile prosecutions was that of Cynthia Payne, the ‘Streatham madam’. He was appointed a High Court judge in 1981. As a Lord Justice of Appeal he sat on the cases that resulted in the Guildford Four and the Birmingham Six having their convictions overturned. Contemporaries expected him to reach the top of the judicial hierarchy, but his career was cut short by the onset of Parkinson’s disease. He was survived by his three sons, his wife Mary having predeceased him, and a daughter having died in infancy.

Ian Martin

29 December 1935 – 12 August 2011

Ian Robert Martin, television executive, died on 12 August 2011, aged 75. H was educated at Wallington County Grammar School, Surrey, and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read English and graduated in 1959. After national service in the Royal Navy he joined the BBC’s current affairs department and then Thames Television, first as a producer and then for ten years as controller of features, education and religion. In 1992 he co-founded HD Thames, which pioneered high-definition television. He was involved in many charities, especially Christian Aid. He was survived by his wife Susan and their four children.

Michael Rayson

19 July 1930 – 12 August 2011

Air Commodore Michael John Rayson LVO, RAF officer, died on 12 August 2011, aged 81. Born in Guernsey, where he remained during the German occupation, he was educated at Elizabeth College, Guernsey, and St Peter’s Hall, Oxford, where he gained an athletics blue but no degree. He joined the RAF as a cadet, and after service in the Middle East and Cyprus was commander of the Queen’s Flight, and later air attaché in Bonn. During his early RAF career he continued to compete as an athlete, and was the RAF’s champion hurdler. He retired to Haselmere, and was survived by his wife Rosemary and their two children.

Robert Robinson

17 December 1927 – 12 August 2011

The broadcaster and writer Robert Robinson died on 12 August 2011, aged 83. Born in Liverpool but brought up in London, he was educated at Raynes Park Grammar School and (after national service in West Africa) Exeter College, Oxford, where he read English, edited Isis, and acted. Graduating in 1951, he worked as a television, film and theatre reviewer for a number of national papers, but was best known as a broadcaster, making his first television appearance in 1955, and subsequently presenting the long-running television shows Call My Bluff and Ask the Family, and the equally long-running radio shows Brain of Britain and Stop the Week. He published several volumes of essays; his novels included Landscape with Dead Dons (1956), set in Oxford. He was survived by his wife Josephine and their three children.

Richard Pulford

14 July 1944 – 7 August 2011

The arts administrator Richard Charles Pulford died on 7 August 2011, aged 67. Born in Newcastle, he was educated at the Royal Grammar School there and at St Catherine’s College, Oxford, where he read jurisprudence. After a year in the Sudan with VSO he joined the civil service, working in the Treasury and Department of Education, but left in 1979 to work for the Arts Council. From 1986 to 1992 he was general director of the South Bank Centre, and thereafter a freelance arts consultant. From 2001 to 2010 he was chief executive of the Society of London Theatre. He was survived by his partner, Laurindo Heleno.

John Wood

5 July 1930 – 6 August 2011

The actor John Wood CBE died on 6 August 2011, aged 81. He was educated at Bedford School and Jesus College, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence, graduating in 1953, and was President of the Oxford University Dramatic Society. After national service he joined the Old Vic Company; he made his West End debut in 1957. Over a long career he gave acclaimed performances in a wide range of plays, from Shakespeare to Stoppard, via Chekhov, Shaw and Joyce. From the mid-1960s he also appeared frequently in television plays and series. He was survived by his wife Sylvia and their four children.

Leslie Le Quesne

24 August 1919 – 5 August 2011

The surgeon Leslie Philip Le Quesne CBE died on 5 August 2011, aged 91. He was educated at Rugby School and Exeter College, Oxford. Having been rejected for war service on account of his poor eyesight, he completed his medical training at the Middlesex Hospital, where he spent the bulk of his career, from 1963 to 1984 as Professor of Surgery and head of department. He was responsible for significant advances in survival rates after major surgery at the Middlesex, and his publications were an important factor leading to the establishment of intensive care units in all surgical hospitals. He also made important contributions to the diagnosis and prevention of deep vein thrombosis (including the introduction of elastic stockings for long plane journeys). In his spare time he became a noted authority on Lord Nelson. He was survived by two sons, his wife Paddy having predeceased him.

Alan Blackshaw

7 April 1933 – 4 August 2011

The civil servant and mountaineer Alan Blackshaw OBE died on 4 August 2011, aged 78. Born in Liverpool, the son of a docker, he won scholarships to Merchant Taylors’ School, Crosby, and Wadham College, Oxford, where he read Modern History and was active in the Oxford Mountaineering Club (and as a prank installed a neon sign on top of Trinity College Tower). Graduating in 1954, he did his national service as an instructor in the Royal Marines, then joined the civil service, where he progressed rapidly through he ranks of the Ministry of Power. In 1977-8 he was the first Director-General of the Offshore Supplies Office, with responsibility for the development of the North Sea oil industry, but quit in order to devote himself full-time to writing and mountaineering. He had already published, in 1965, the first edition of Mountaineering: From Hill Walking to Alpine Climbing, which rapidly became known as ‘Blackshaw’s Mountaineering’, and was constantly updated. He served as president of the Mountaineering Council (1973-6), the Ski Club of Great Britain (1997-2003), the Alpine Club (2001-4), and the Union Internationale des Associations d’Alpinisme (2005-11). He lived latterly at Newtonmore, on the edge of the Cairngorms. He was survived by his wife Elspeth, their three children, and a daughter from his first marriage.

Letty Lewenz

14 August 1924 – 1 August 2011

Letty Louise Lewenz, headmistress of Nottingham Girls’ High School from 1967 to 1984, died on 1 August 2011, aged 86. Born in Nottingham, she was educated at the Girls’ High School and St Hugh’s College, Oxford, where she read Modern History, graduating in 1945. She taught at her old school and High Storrs Grammar School, Sheffield, before becoming headmistress of Harrison Barrow Girls’ Grammar School, Birmingham, from 1959 to 1967. As headmistress of Nottingham Girls’, she presided over an expansion of the school, and its opting for independence on the phasing out of direct grant schools. In retirement she involved herself in numerous charitable activities.

Sir John Rawlins

12 May 1922 – 27 July 2011

Surgeon Vice-Admiral Sir John Stuart Pepys Rawlins KBE, Medical Director-General of the Royal Navy from 1977 to 1980, died on 27 July 2011, aged 89. Born at Amesbury, Wiltshire, he studied Medicine at University College, Oxford, then worked briefly at the London Chest Hospital before being called up for national service in the Royal Navy. He subsequently won a permanent commission. Specialising in aviation medicine, he designed a new, automatically-inflating ‘G-suit’ for aircrew of fast jets, a new type of crash helmet for pilots, and an underwater escape system for submerged aircraft. His penultimate post was as Dean of Naval Medicine. He was appointed MBE in 1956, OBE in 1960, and KBE in 1978. In retirement he was associated with a number of companies working with underwater technology. He was survived by his four children, his wife Diana having predeceased him.

John Read

7 January 1923 – 26 July 2011

The documentary film-maker John Read died on 26 July 2011, aged 88. The son of Sir Herbert Read, the art critic, he was brought up in Hampstead and London. During the Second World War he worked as a camera assistant to George Hollering. He then read English at Jesus College, Oxford, where he made a documentary on student life. Graduating in 1948, he worked first for the Central Office of Information and then for the BBC, for whom over the next thirty years he made more than a hundred films, including acclaimed documentaries about Henry Moore and other artists. He was later a contributor to the arts programmes Omnibus, Arena and The South Bank Show, and worked as a producer, before retiring in 1983. He was survived by his second wife, Louise.

Clive Allison

15 June 1944 – 25 July 2011

The publisher Clive Robert William Allison died on 25 July 2011, aged 67. Educated at Sutton High School and Trinity College, Oxford, where he read English, he published his own and other people’s poetry while still an undergraduate. After working for Macmillan and Panther Books, in 1967 he joined forces with Margaret Busby to launch the publishers Allison & Busby, which over the next twenty years published an acclaimed list of poetry, fiction, children’s books, and occasional non-fiction. The company was eventually sold to W H Allen, and he then became proprietor of a secondhand bookshop in Deal, and later worked as a paralegal. He was survived by two daughters, his marriage having ended in divorce.

John Blandy

11 September 1927 – 23 July 2011

The urologist John Peter Blandy CBE died on 23 July 2011, aged 83. Born in Calcutta, the son of Sir Nicolas Blandy, civil servant, he was educated at Clifton College and Balliol College, Oxford, graduating in 1951. After national service with the RAMC and spells in London, Ilford, and Chicago (as a Robertson Fellow) he took his Oxford DM in 1963. His subsequent career was based at the London Hospital and St Peter’s Hospital, London, where he developed a wide-ranging expertise in urology; he was Professor of Urology at the University of London from 1969 to 1992. He wrote many standard texts, and developed new techniques for treating prostate conditions and narrowing of the urethra. He was President of the British Association of Urological Surgeons in 1984 and of the European Association of Urology in 1986-8. In retirement he pursued his hobbies of painting and sculpture. He was survived by his wife Anne and their four daughters.

Ken Hopkins

13 March 1925 – 23 July 2011

Kenneth Samuel (Ken) Hopkins, educationist and Labour Party activist, died on 23 July 2011, aged 86. Born into a Welsh-speaking family in Pontycymer, Glamorgan, the son of a Congregational minister, he was educated at the Boys’ County Grammar School in Porth and (after war service as a submariner) St Catherine’s Society, Oxford, where he read English. On graduating in 1949 he became a teacher, headmaster of Ferndale Grammar School, Rhondda Fach, and then Director of Education at Mid Glamorgan County Council. He was active in the Labour Party, and was chairman of Welsh Labour in 1991-2. In the 1970s he was a fervent opponent of devolution, but by the 1990s had become an equally fervent supporter. In 2006 he published a pamphlet, Saving our Language, which advocated radical measures to encourage use of the Welsh language. With his wife Margaret he had one daughter.

Ernst Honigmann

29 November 1927 – 18 July 2011

Ernst Anselm Joachim Honigmann FBA, Shakespeare scholar, died on 18 July 2011, aged 83. Born in Breslau, the son of the director of Breslau Zoo, he fled with his family to Britain, moving from London to Birmingham then Glasgow. He attended Glasgow University before completing an Oxford BLitt on the chronology of Shakespeare’s plays. His subsequent career was at Glasgow then Newcastle, where he was Joseph Cowen Professor of English Literature from 1970 to 1989. An acclaimed lecturer, he was the author of numerous books on Shakespeare, but was most renowned for his work on Shakespeare’s ‘lost years’ and his suggestion that the playwright may have been a Catholic. He was survived by three children, his wife Elsie having predeceased him.

Ian Bellany

21 February 1941 – 17 July 2011

The international relations scholar Ian Bellany died on 17 July 2011, aged 79. Born in Aberdeen, he was educated at Firth Park Grammar School, Sheffield, and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Physics. After graduating in 1962 he stayed on to take a DPhil in nuclear physics in 1965. He then spent three years in the Foreign Office working under Hedley Bull, whom he followed to the Australian National University, Canberra, in 1968. In 1970 he was recruited to Lancaster University, where he spent the remainder of his career, becoming a professor in 1979. He published ten books and numerous articles, notably on arms control, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and terrorism. He was founding editor of the journal Arms Control, and an adviser to governments. He was survived by his wife Wendy and their two children.

Neill Cox

12 June 1923 – 16 July 2011

Flight Lieutenant Neill Dudley Cox DFC, air force officer, barrister, and farmer, died on 16 July 2011, aged 88. He was educated at Charterhouse and after a short course at Oxford joined the RAF in March 1941. He saw active service in North Africa and the Mediterranean, flying Beaufighters and Spitfires, and was awarded a DFC and bar. On demobilisation he read Jurisprudence at Trinity College, Oxford, then practised for several years as a barrister before turning to farming, near Henley-on-Thames; his dairy herd won several awards. He was survived by his wife Pamela, their two children, and the two children of his first marriage.

Deryck Sidney

27 January 1920 – 16 July 2011

The businessman Deryck Malcolm Sidney died on 16 July 2011, aged 91. He was educated at St Albans School and read English at Jesus College, Oxford, but his studies were interrupted by the Second World War, during which he served with the Royal Artillery in North Africa and Italy, including at Monte Cassino. After completing his degree he undertook research for the National Institute of Industrial Psychology and at Birkbeck College, London, before working as a personnel manager for firms including BAT, Plessey, and Bass Charrington. Having himself been made redundant in 1973, he then pioneered ‘outplacement’ (the provision of counselling and career guidance, and also of office facilities, principally for redundant executives) in Britain, initially as head of the new London office of the American firm Thinc, and then as a partner in Sanders and Sidney, which grew to be the major European provider of such services. In retirement he worked as a careers adviser and as a bereavement counsellor. He was survived by his wife Philippa and their three sons.

Norman Hampson

8 April 1922 – 8 July 2011

The historian Norman Hampson FBA died on 8 July 2011, aged 89. Educated at Manchester Grammar School, during the Second World War he served in the Royal Navy, including as a liaison officer with Free French forces. On demobilisation he read Modern History at University College, Oxford, and on graduation in 1947 he was immediately offered a post at Manchester University. He subsequently taught at Newcastle and York, where he became Professor of History in 1974, retiring in 1989 but continuing to teach for another decade. As an historian he made his name with A Social History of the French Revolution (1963), which was followed by nine further books on aspects of the French Revolution, including studies of Danton, Saint-Just, and Robespierre, and a particularly successful book on The Enlightenment (1968). Politically liberal and anti-authoritarian, he was a formidable critic of Marxist and other determinist interpretations of eighteenth-century French history. He was predeceased by his wife Jacqueline (the sister of one of his Free French shipmates); they had two daughters.

Frank Brenchley

9 April 1918 – 7 July 2011

The diplomat (Thomas) Frank Brenchley CMG died on 7 July 2011, aged 93. He was educated at Sir William Turner’s School, Coatham, and Merton College, Oxford, where he took classical moderations in 1938 but had to wait until 1947 to graduate in Literae Humaniores (having in the meantime served in intelligence in the Middle East and Turkey). On graduating he joined GCHQ, then transferred to the Foreign Office. His early postings were mostly in the Middle East, but he reached ambassadorial rank as ambassador to Norway (1968-72) and Poland (1972-74). In retirement he wrote a number of books on international relations, was chairman of the Institute for the Study of Conflict, and frequently appeared on television as a commentator on security issues. He was survived by his three daughters, his wife Edith having predeceased him.

Francis King

4 March 1923 – 3 July 2011

The novelist, short-story writer and theatre critic Francis Henry King CBE died on 3 July 2011, aged 88. The son of an official in the Indian Police, he was born in Switzerland, spent his early childhood in India, and was educated at Shrewsbury and Balliol College, Oxford. His undergraduate career was interrupted by the Second World War (during which, as a conscientious objector, he worked on a farm). On returning to Oxford he switched from Greats to English. After graduating he worked for the British Council for thirteen years, the last five of them in Kyoto. He had already published three novels as an undergraduate; in all he published some fifty books, mostly novels, but also including short story collections, biographies, and literary guide books. For ten years he was drama critic of the Daily Telegraph. He was active in PEN, of which he was international president from 1986 to 1989. He was appointed OBE in 1979 and CBE in 1985. He was survived by his civil partner, Karim Deham.

Brian Dance

22 November 1929 – 2 July 2011

Brian David Dance, headmaster, died on 2 July 2011, aged 81. He read Jurisprudence at Wadham College, Oxford, graduating in 1952, but opted to go into teaching, initially at Kingston Grammar School and later in Faversham and London. He was successively headmaster of Cirencester Grammar School (1965-6), founding principal of Luton Sixth Form College (1966-73) and headmaster of St Dunstan’s College, in Catford, south-east London (1973-93). With his wife Chloe he had four children.

Geoffrey Hancock

20 June 1926 – 2 July 2011

Geoffrey Francis Hancock CMG, intelligence officer, died on 2 July 2011, aged 85. The son of Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Cyril Hancock, he spent his early years in India. He was educated at Wellington College and, after service in the RAF in Ceylon, Trinity College, Oxford, where he read French and Spanish, graduating in 1951. After a short spell in retailing he joined the Secret Intelligence Service (MI6), serving in Latin America, Spain, and the Middle East, notably in Beirut during the height of the civil war in the mid-1970s. After retiring in 1982 he set up Middle East Consultants, which provided advice to businesses. With his Spanish wife Amelia he had two children.

John Joly

12 November 1924 – 2 July 2011

The businessman John Joly died on 2 July 2011, aged 86. Born into an old-established Levantine trading and shipping family, he was educated at Haileybury and (after war service with the Fleet Air Arm) Oriel College, Oxford, where he took a war-shortened course in French, graduating in 1949. He then joined the family firm, the Beirut-based Henry Heald and Company, eventually succeeding his father as chairman (and in turn being succeeded by his daughter). He was much involved with the British community and the Anglican Church in Beirut. He was survived by his wife Yvonne and by his two children.

Robin Alston

29 January 1933 – 29 June 2011

The historical bibliographer Robin Carfrae Alston OBE died on 29 June 2011, aged 78. Born in Trinidad into a shipping family, he was brought up in Barbados, and educated at Rugby School, the University of British Columbia, and Corpus Christi College, Oxford, where he read English, graduating in 1956. After a spell teaching at the University of Toronto he studied for a PhD at King’s College, London, on historical linguistics. From 1964 to 1976 he taught at the University of Leeds, where he founded the Scolar Press (which by the time of his death had published more than 2,000 facsimiles of pre-1801 texts). From 1977 to 1989 he was attached to the British Library as editor-in-chief of the (Anglo-American) Eighteenth-Century Short Title Catalogue. From 1990 to 1998 he was Professor of Library Studies at the University of London. His lifetime’s work was A Bibliography of the English Language from the Invention of Printing to the Year 1800, which reached twenty volumes by 2010. He was survived by his third wife, Conceicao, and by two children of his first marriage.

Lord Rodger of Earlsferry

18 September 1944 – 26 June 2011

Alan Ferguson Rodger, Baron Rodger of Earlsferry QC PC FBA FRSE, a Justice of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom, died on 26 June 2011, aged 66. Born in Glasgow, the son of Thomas Rodger, Professor of Psychological Medicine at Glasgow University, he was educated at Kelvinside Academy and Glasgow University before studying for an Oxford DPhil on Roman law. He remained at Oxford first as Dyke Junior Fellow at Balliol College and then as a fellow and tutor at New College, but left in 1972 to practise as an advocate in Edinburgh. He took silk in 1985. In 1992 he became Lord Advocate, and was made a life peer and a privy councillor. From 1996 to 2001 he was Lord President of the Court of Session and Lord Justice General of Scotland. He became a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary (a ‘law lord’) in 2001, and a Justice of the Supreme Court on its creation in 2009. He was the author of several books, and was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1991 and of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1992. From 2008 he was High Steward of the University of Oxford. He was unmarried.

Nathan Clark

16 July 1916 – 23 June 2011

The shoe manufacturer Nathan Clark died on 23 June 2011, aged 94. The grand-grandson of James Clark, founder of the Clarks shoe firm, it was always intended that he should join the business. He was educated at the Odenwaldschule in Germany and at The Queen’s College, Oxford, but left early to volunteer as an ambulance driver for the Republicans during the Spanish Civil War. During the Second World War he served in the Royal Army Service Corps. On demobilisation he joined the family firm. In 1949, against initial opposition from other family members, Clarks introduced their range of desert boots, designed by Clark, and modelled on the suede boots made in Cairo for officers of the Eighth Army. These went on to become a style icon and one of the firm’s bestsellers, as did Clark’s sandal designs. He eventually left the firm and settled in New York. He was unmarried.

Martin Hughes

15 May 1949 – 23 June 2011

The developmental psychologist Martin Hughes died on 23 June 2011, aged 62. He was educated at Manchester Grammar School and University College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy and Psychology. He went on to take a PhD at Edinburgh University for a thesis critiquing Piaget’s theories. Subsequently he taught at Exeter and Bristol universities and published widely on aspects of young children’s learning experiences, including out-of-school settings. From 2001 to 2004 he directed the large-scale Home-School Knowledge Exchange Project. He was survived by a son.

Basil Mitchell

9 April 1917 – 23 June 2011

Basil George Mitchell FBA, Nolloth Professor of the Philosophy of the Christian Religion from 1968 to 1994, died on 23 June 2011, aged 94. He was educated at King Edward VI School, Southampton, and The Queen’s College, Oxford, graduating with a first in Greats in 1939. After wartime service in the Royal Navy he became tutor in Philosophy at Keble College in 1947, moving to Oriel on taking up the Nolloth chair. He was a prominent critic of liberal humanism, his major books including Law, Morality and Religion in a Secular Society (1966) and Morality: Religious and Secular (1980). He served on numerous Church of England working parties and was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1983. He was survived by his wife Margaret and their four children.

Zbynĕk Zeman

18 October 1928 – 22 June 2011

Zbynĕk Anthony Bohuslav Zeman, Research Professor in European History at Oxford from 1982 to 1996 and professorial fellow of St Edmund Hall from 1983 to 1996, died on 22 June 2011, aged 82. Born in Prague, he fled Czechoslovakia after the Second World War, and after completing a first degree at University College, London, in 1951 he studied at St Antony’s College, Oxford, for a thesis on the Czechs and the Habsburg monarchy, for which he awarded a DPhil in 1956. He subsequently held a research fellowship at St Antony’s College (1958-61). He then taught at St Andrews and (after a spell as the first director of Amnesty International’s research department) Lancaster before returning to Oxford. He published widely and innovatively on the modern history of eastern Europe, including German and Russian policies from the nineteenth century onwards. He was survived by his second wife, Dagmar, and by three children of his first marriage.

Arthur Budgett

26 May 1916 – 21 June 2011

The racehorse trainer Arthur Budgett died on 21 June 2011, aged 95. He was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford, where he was captain of the university polo team. After war service in India he trained first at East Ilsley and then at Whatcombe, Berkshire. He bred, owned, and trained two Derby winners, Blakeney in 1969 and Morston in 1973. He retired in the mid-1970s, and was survived by his wife Patricia and two sons.

Robert Oakeshott

26 July 1933 – 21 June 2011

The social reformer Robert Noël Waddington Oakeshott died on 21 June 2011, aged 77. The son of Sir Walter Oakeshott, the classicist, Rector of Lincoln College, and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford, he attended Balliol College, where he read Greats. After a brief spell as a journalist, he spent ten years on development projects in Africa before returning to Britain where he became a leading advocate of co-operatives and employee ownership, and a frequent contributor to The Economist and The Spectator. A brief marriage ended in divorce.

Ambrose Griffiths

4 December 1928 – 14 June 2011

The Right Reverend (Michael) Ambrose Griffiths OSB, Abbot of Ampleforth and later Roman Catholic Bishop of Hexham and Newcastle, died on 14 June 2011, aged 82. Born John Michael Martin Griffiths, he was educated at Ampleforth and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Chemistry. Graduating in 1950, he entered the Ampleforth novitiate, and after training in Rome returned to teach at Ampleforth, where he became head of science. He succeeded Basil Hume as Abbot of Ampleforth in 1976. In 1984 he left Ampleforth to become parish priest at St Mary’s, Leyland, Lancashire; he returned to Leyland as a curate following his term as Bishop of Hexham and Newcastle, from 1992 to 2004.

Simon Price

27 September 1954 – 14 June 2011

The ancient historian Simon Price died on 14 June 2011, aged 56. The son of Hetley Price, Bishop of Ripon, he was educated at Manchester Grammar School and The Queen’s College, Oxford, where he read Greats and was tutored by Fergus Millar. In 1980 he was awarded a DPhil for a thesis on religious aspects of the imperial cult in Asia Minor, which led to his first book, in 1984. The following year he became fellow and tutor in Ancient History at Lady Margaret Hall. Among his other books were the two-volume Religions of Rome (1998, with Mary Beard and John North), Religions of the Ancient Greeks (1999), The Birth of Classical Europe: A History from Troy to Augustine (2010), and An Oxford Reader in Roman Religion (2011, with John North). He was successful in securing the admission of ‘Religions of the Greek and Roman World’ to the undergraduate syllabus. He took early retirement on health grounds in 2008. He was survived by his wife, the archaeologist Lucia Nixon, and their two daughters.

John Beazley

18 July 1916 – 13 June 2011

Wing Commander (Hugh) John Sherard Beazley, a Second World War fighter pilot, died on 13 June 2011, aged 94. The son of Sir Hugh Beazley, Common Serjeant of the City of London, he was educated at Cheltenham College and Pembroke College, Oxford, where he read history and joined the University Air Squadron. Called up on the outbreak of war, he served in the Battle of Britain, the defence of Malta, the North African campaign, and the Far East, and was credited with many ‘kills’. After the war he joined the Colonial Service, and served in Nigeria for ten years; he then trained as a chartered accountant, retiring in 1981 as finance director of the BET Group. He was survived by his wife Mary and three children.

Ann McPherson

22 June 1945 – 28 May 2011

Ann McPherson CBE, a general practitioner, health researcher, author, and advocate of assisted suicide, died on 28 May 2011, aged 65. Born Ann Egelnick in London, she was educated at Copthall County Grammar School and St George’s Hospital Medical School, London. After training stints in London, Oxford, and Harvard, she became a general practitioner in Oxford in 1979. In 2001 she joined Oxford University’s Department of Primary Health Care as a part-time lecturer and founding director of the Health Experiences Research Group. She was the author of more than twenty books; her Diary of a Teenage Health Freak (1987) was translated into 25 languages and sold more than a million copies. She was appointed CBE in 2000 for services to adolescent and women’s health. The founder of Healthcare Professionals for Assisted Dying, she was herself diagnosed with cancer but unable to end her own life as she would have wished. She was survived by her husband Klim and their three children.

Oliver Fiennes

17 May 1926 – 8 June 2011

The Very Rev Oliver William Twistleton-Wykeham-Fiennes, Dean of Lincoln from 1969 to 1989, died on 8 June 2011, aged 85. The younger son of the 20th Lord Saye and Sele, he was educated at Eton and (following war service with the Green Howards) New College, Oxford, followed by Cuddesdon Theological College. After a curacy at New Milton and several years in Lambeth (under the inspirational Bishop Mervyn Stockwood) he was chosen to inject new life into Lincoln Cathedral, but was frustrated by the slow pace of change and unsurprised by the damning Visitation of 1990, which came a year after he had resigned on health grounds. He was survived by four children, his wife Juliet having predeceased him.

Dame Barbara Mills

10 August 1940 – 28 May 2011

Dame Barbara Jean Lyon Mills DBE QC, Director of Public Prosecutions from 1992 to 1998, died on 28 May 2011, aged 70. She was born Barbara Warnock and educated at St Helen’s School, Northwood, and Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, where she studied Jurisprudence. She was called to the bar in 1963, and was Treasury Counsel for the Central Criminal Court from 1981 to 1986 and a Recorder from 1982 to 1992. From 1990 to 1992 she was director of the Serious Fraud Office (leading the investigation into Asil Nadir’s Polly Peck empire) before being appointed the first female Director of Public Prosecutions, but her tenure of the post was controversial, and she was forced to retire early after a critical report on her management of the Crown Prosecution Service by Lord Justice Glidewell. From 1999 to 2009 she was the adjudicator for HM Revenue and Customs, dealing with complaints from the public. She was survived by her husband John and their four children.

Michael André Bernstein

31 August 1947 – 25 May 2011

The literary scholar and novelist Michael André Bernstein died on 25 May 2011, aged 63. Born in Austria and raised in Europe, Canada and the United States, he attended Princeton University before completing a thesis at Oxford on Ezra Pound and the modern verse epic, for which he was awarded a DPhil in 1974. He then took a post at the University of California at Berkeley, where he spent the rest of his academic career, latterly as Professor of English and Comparative Literature. As well as scholarly works on history, literature, art and politics, he published a volume of poetry, Prima della Rivoluzione (1984), and a novel, Conspirators (2004). In 1995 he was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was survived by his wife Dalya and three daughters.

Peter Smith

5 December 1928 – 25 May 2011

Peter Vivian Henworth Smith CB, barrister and colonial judge, died on 25 May 2011, aged 82. Educated at Clacton County High School and (after national service in Kenya) Brasenose College, Oxford, he was called to the bar by Lincoln’s Inn in 1953. Awarded a Colonial Service probationership, he served in Nyasaland from 1955, initially as a resident magistrate and latterly (after the colony’s independence as Malawi in 1964) as a judge of the High Court. In 1970 he, along with the rest of the High Court bench, resigned in protest at what they regarded as political interference. On returning to Britain he joined the Solicitor’s Office of HM Customs and Excise, becoming its head in 1986. After retirement in 1989 he served as legal adviser to various bodies including the Broadcasting Standards Commission. He was survived by his wife Mary and five daughters.

John Templeton-Cotill

4 June 1920 – 23 May 2011

Rear-Admiral John Atrill Templeton-Cotill CB, naval officer, died on 23 May 2011, aged 90. The son of a First World War tank officer, he was educated at Canford School and New College, Oxford, but his education was interrupted by the Second World War. Joining the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, he served initially on corvettes, then as a liaison officer with the Free French forces and with the US Army in the Pacific, before ending the war as a lieutenant on a motor torpedo-boat. He decided to make his career in the navy and held a succession of increasingly senior appointments, retiring in 1973 as Flag Officer, Malta, and NATO Commander, South-East Mediterranean. Four years earlier he achieved a degree of national fame as the subject of a television documentary, Captain RN. After leaving the navy he worked for seven years as a director of Sotheby’s in Paris and Monaco; he settled in Provence. An earlier marriage was dissolved, and he was survived by his partner, Geneviève Denise.

John Graham

7 March 1940 – 18 May 2011

The journalist John Douglas Skelton Graham died on 18 May 2011, aged 71. He was born at Eton, the son of a classics master (who later became headmaster of Portora Royal School in Northern Ireland), and was educated at Eton, St Paul’s School, and Worcester College, Oxford, where he read Greats. After a few years teaching at Upper Canada College, Toronto, he turned to journalism, working at various points for the Financial Times, The Spectator, The Observer, Business Times in Singapore, and the English-language Daily Star in Beirut. Latterly he was a freelance journalist, combining the posts of bridge columnist for The Times, drinks columnist for GQ, and contributing editor of Tatler. He won a number of press awards. He was unmarried.

Jasper Guinness

9 March 1954 – 7 May 2011

The farmer, horticulturist and socialite Jasper Jonathan Richard Guinness died on 7 May 2011, aged 57. The son of the third Baron Moyne (and grandson of the second Baron and of Lady Diana Mosley), he was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence. He worked for some years as the junior librarian at the British Institute in Florence, before taking up olive-growing and viticulture in Chianti. In 1989 he bought Arniano, a crumbling farmhouse near Buonconvento in southern Tuscany, where he created a renowned garden. He also designed gardens for others. He was survived by his wife Camilla and their two daughters.

Victoria Fitzwilliam-Lay

19 March 1969 – 6 May 2011

The landscape painter Victoria Fitzwilliam-Lay died on 6 May 2011, aged 42. Born in Wimbledon, she was educated at St Mary’s School, Calne, and Manchester College, Oxford, where she read Modern History. She then studied at Chelsea Art College and the Charles Cecil School of Art in Florence. Initially she worked as a portrait painter, but after moving to Shropshire she took up landscape painting. She subsequently moved to Northumbria. Her paintings fetched high prices and were much sought after. She was survived by her husband, Roland Potts, and their two sons.

Hugh Freeman

4 August 1929 – 4 May 2011

The psychiatrist Hugh Lionel Freeman, credited with leading the expansion of day and outpatient care for psychiatric patients, died on 4 May 2011, aged 81. He was educated at Altrincham Grammar School and St John’s College, Oxford, switching from Modern History to Medicine. He qualified in 1954, and after national service in the Royal Army Medical Corps undertook training at the Maudsley Hospital in London. From 1961 to 1988 he was a consultant psychiatrist in Salford, where he transformed services for patients. He was the author of numerous books and editor of the British Journal of Psychiatry from 1983 to 1993. In 1997 he was appointed an honorary visiting fellow at Green College, Oxford. He was survived by his wife Joan (a distinguished psychologist) and their four children.

Neil Macvicar

16 May 1920 – 3 May 2011

Neil Macvicar QC, soldier, lawyer, and author, died on 3 May 2011, aged 90. The son of a Writer to the Signet, he was educated at Loretto School and Oriel College, Oxford, where he took classical moderations in 1939. He served in the Royal Artillery throughout the Second World War, seeing action in North Africa and Italy before being sent to Greece to assist the anti-ELAS forces. He returned to Oxford after demobilisation but switched to Jurisprudence, graduating in 1946. He then practised as an advocate in Edinburgh, becoming a QC, Chancellor of the Diocese of Edinburgh (1961-74) and Sheriff of Lothian and the Borders (1968-85). With his Greek wife Maria he spent much time in Corfu. He wrote three volumes of memoirs. He and his wife had three children, one of whom predeceased him.

Jeremy Paul

29 July 1939 – 3 May 2011

The playwright and screenwriter Jeremy Paul died on 3 May 2011, aged 71. Born Jeremy Paul Roche, the son of the theatrical impresario Dominic Roche and the actress Joan Haythorne, he never knew his father, and later adopted the name Jeremy Paul. He was educated at the King’s School, Canterbury, and St Edmund Hall, Oxford, but abandoned his studies in English after one year, having already sold his first television play and been offered a three-year contract by Lew Grade’s ATV. Thereafter he was a scriptwriter or many of the most successful television series from the 1960s to the 1990s, including Granada TV’s Sherlock Holmes series; Upstairs, Downstairs; The Duchess of Duke Street; Roald Dahl’s Tales of the Unexpected, and Lovejoy. He was survived by his wife Patricia and their four daughters.

Catharine Nicholson

4 June 1958 – 30 April 2011

The botanical artist Catharine Mary Louise (Kitty) Nicholson died on 30 April 2011, aged 52. The daughter of a barrister, David Gardam, and the writer Jane Gardam, she was educated at St Paul’s Girls’ School and St Hilda’s College, Oxford, where she read Modern History. She then spent three years at the Courtauld Institute before joining English Heritage. She took up botanical art after raising a family, and became renowned for the delicacy and detail of her pen-and-ink drawings, which often, especially after the diagnosis of breast cancer in 2007, concerned decaying or diseased plants. She was survived by her husband Christopher Nicholson and their three children, and by her brother Tim Gardam, Principal of St Anne’s College.

Dan Quillen

22 June 1940 – 30 April 2011

Daniel Gray Quillen, an American mathematician, died on 30 April 2011, aged 70. Educated at Newark Academy and Harvard University, he wrote his PhD thesis on partial differential equations. He worked primarily at MIT before becoming Waynflete Professor of Pure Mathematics and fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford, from 1984 to 2006. He was particularly noted for his proof of the Adams conjecture in topology, and his creation of algebraic K-theory. He was awarded the Fields medal of the International Mathematical Union in 1978. He was survived by his wife Jean and their six children.

John Wilders

30 July 1927 – 30 April 2011

The Shakespeare scholar John Wilders died on 31 April 2011, aged 83. Born near Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, the son of a civil engineer and grandson of a miner, he was educated at the local grammar school and St John’s College, Cambridge. Following a PhD at Princeton on Samuel Butler he taught at the University of Bristol, then from 1968 to 1992 was English tutor at Worcester College, Oxford. For the next ten years he taught at Middlebury College in Vermont, finally retiring to Beverley, East Yorkshire. He published a number of books, notably Lost Garden: A View of Shakespeare’s English and Roman Plays (1979); he was also consultant to the BBC’s productions of Shakespeare’s plays (1978-85) and wrote prefaces for the BBC’s publication of each play. He was survived by his two sons, his wife Benedickte and one daughter having predeceased him.

Margaret Hubbard

16 June 1924 – 28 April 2011

Margaret Hubbard, classical scholar and founding fellow of St Anne’s College, died on 28 April 2011, aged 86. Born and brought up in Australia, she graduated in Latin and English from the University of Adelaide, and was immediately appointed a tutor there. Two years later she moved to Somerville College, to read Greats; she was the first woman to be awarded the Hertford Prize in Latin. After a few years in Munich working for the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae she returned to Oxford in 1957 to become tutor in classics at St Anne’s College. She remained there until retirement in 1986. During this time she collaborated with Robin Nisbet on acclaimed commentaries on the first two books of Horace’s Odes, published in 1970 and 1978. She was unmarried.

Sir Denis Mahon

8 November 1910 – 24 April 2011

The art historian and collector Sir (John) Denis Mahon CH CBE FBA died on 24 April 2011, aged 100. From a wealthy family (who owned the Guinness Mahon merchant bank, based in Dublin), he was educated at Eton College and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read Modern History. He then stayed on for a year to study with Kenneth Clark, Director of the Ashmolean, before attending the Courtauld Institute under Nikolaus Pevsner. He published numerous books and articles, especially on seventeenth-century Italian art, and built up a sizeable collection of Old Masters, estimating that he had spent around £50,000 on paintings that were valued in the early 2000s at more than £30 million. He was active in the art world, and unusually served two terms as a trustee of the National Gallery. He was appointed CBE in 1967, knighted in 1986, and made a Companion of Honour in 2003. He was unmarried, and left the bulk of his collection to the nation.

Gay Kindersley

2 June 1930 – 21 April 2011

Gay Kindersley, the first President of the Amateur Jockeys’ Association of Great Britain, died on 21 April 2011, aged 80. The son of Philip Kindersley and Oonagh Guinness (one of the celebrated ‘Golden Guinness Girls’, who later married the fourth Baron Oranmore and Browne), he attended Eton College and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, but left after two terms. He then spent some time in the 7th Hussars and working on an oil rig in Canada before establishing himself as a successful amateur jockey, winning the amateur jockeys’ championship in 1959-60. In later life he turned to breeding and training (naming his horses after characters in Dickens). He was survived by his second wife Philippa and by six children.

Tim Hetherington

5 December 1970 – 20 April 2011

The photographer and film-maker Timothy Alistair Telemachus (Tim) Hetherington died on 20 April 2011, aged 40. Born in Birkenhead, he was educated at Stonyhurst College and Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, where he read English. After studying photojournalism at Cardiff University he worked for The Big Issue as a staff photographer then for a decade in Africa; his book of photographs from Liberia, Long Story Bit by Bit, was published in 2009, and he made films on Liberia and Darfur. In 2007 he won the World Press Photo award for his photographs from Afghanistan, and his documentary film with Sebastian Junger, Restrepo, was nominated for an Academy Award. He was killed in a mortar attack while covering the siege of Misrata, Libya. He was survived by his girlfriend, Idil Ibrahim.

David Donne

17 August 1925 – 11 April 2011

The industrialist David Lucas Donne died on 11 April 2011, aged 85. The son of a New Zealand-born doctor, he was educated at Stowe School and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read Chemistry and captained the university’s water polo team. He was called to the bar in 1949 and specialised in tax law. He also studied Business Administration at Syracuse University, New York. Called in as a troubleshooter and company doctor, he was chairman of a number of companies, including the housebuilder Crest Nicholson, the retailers Asda and Argos, the food and agribusiness group Dalgety, and the brickmaker Steetley. His first wife predeceased him and he was survived by his second wife, Clare, and the three children of his first marriage.

Sir John Lowther

17 November 1923 – 11 April 2011

Sir John Luke Lowther KCVO CBE, army officer and farmer, died on 11 April 2011, aged 87. He was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics. In 1942 he joined the King’s Royal Rifle Corps, with whom he served in north-west Europe following the Normandy landings; his war ended when his left foot was blown off by a mine. He subsequently worked for the Singer Sewing Machine Company in New York and set up his own paint business before moving in 1960 to Guilsborough to farm the family estate. He served as a Conservative county councillor in Northamptonshire from 1970 to 1984 and was leader of the council from 1977 to 1981. From 1984 to 1998 he was Lord Lieutenant for Northamptonshire. He was appointed CBE in 1983 and knighted KCVO in 1997. He was survived by his wife Jenny and their three children.

Reginald Llewellyn

26 July 1916 – 10 April 2011

Reginald Sinclair Llewellyn, prison governor, died on 10 April 2011, aged 94. He was born in Exmouth and attended Sherborne School and New College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. During the Second World War he served with the Royal Artillery, reaching the rank of major. On demobilisation he joined the Prison Service, working initially in borstals. He was Governor of Bedford Prison in 1962 when James Hanratty was hanged there for the A6 murder. He was later Principal of the Prison Service College, Wakefield. His last appointment was as Governor of Wandsworth Prison. On retirement in 1976 he moved to Winchester where, a committed Christian, he served for many years as a cathedral guide. He was survived by three daughters, his wife Juliet having predeceased him.

Baruch Blumberg

28 July 1925 – 5 April 2011

Thomas Henry BinghamBaruch Samuel Blumberg, the Nobel Prize-winning biochemist, and Master of Balliol College from 1989 to 1994, died on 5 April 2011, aged 85. Born in New York, he was educated at Far Rockaway High School in Queens, New York, and, after war service in the US Navy, Union College in Schenectady, Columbia University, where he read Medicine, and Balliol College, Oxford, where he wrote his DPhil thesis on the biochemistry of hyaluronic acid. He then worked at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, and the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia. In 1976 he shared the Nobel Prize for Medicine with Carleton Gajdusek for the discovery of the virus that causes hepatitis B. In 1983-4 he spent a year at Balliol as visiting professor, and in 1988 he was the first American and the first scientist to be elected Master of Balliol. He was later an astrobiologist at Nasa (investigating the possibility of life on other planets). From 2005 he was President of the American Philosophical Society. He was survived by his wife Jean and their four children.

Hugh Woodcock

9 February 1925 – 2 April 2011

Hugh Elborough Parry Woodcock, headmaster of Dulwich College Preparatory School from 1962 to 1991, died on 2 April 2011, aged 86. He was educated at the Dragon School and St Edward’s School, Oxford, then, following wartime service in the Royal Navy, Trinity College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. His taught at the Dragon School before becoming headmaster of Portsmouth Grammar Junior School at the age of twenty-nine. After eight years there he moved to Dulwich, where he oversaw important changes in the curriculum and a substantial building programme. After retiring from Dulwich he returned briefly to the Dragon School as a caretaker headmaster. He was twice chairman of the Incorporated Association of Preparatory Schools. He was survived by his wife Bridget, their four children, and his brother John, the former cricket correspondent of The Times.

Wilfrid Knapp

4 December 1924 – 30 March 2011

Wilfrid Knapp, the political scientist and founding fellow of St Catherine’s College, Oxford, died on 30 March 2011, aged 86. Born in Harrow, his studies at New College, Oxford, were interrupted by war service in the RAF Photographic Unit. After graduating in Philosophy, Politics and Economics, he studied for a year at the Sorbonne with a Korda Scholarship before returning to become a lecturer at New College in 1949. He moved to St Catherine’s Society as tutor in politics in 1950. He was instrumental in persuading his New College tutor, Alan Bullock, to become Censor of St Catherine’s in 1952, and played a key role in St Catherine’s affairs both before and after the transformation of the Society into a College in 1962. His work as a political scientist ranged widely, from postwar Europe, through North Africa, to the Middle East. He was predeceased by his wife Pat.

John Kynaston

28 August 1914 – 26 March 2011

Colonel John Roger Kynaston MC DSO, army officer and farmer, died on 26 March 2011, aged 96. Born near Wrexham, he was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read Modern History. After attending the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, he was commissioned in the Royal Horse Artillery, with which he served throughout the Second Word War. He took part in the evacuation from Dunkirk, won his MC at the Battle of El Alamein, and a DSO during the fighting in Normandy. He left the army in 1947 and settled at Hardwick, near Ellesmere, Shropshire, where he managed the family estate and was president of the local branch of the Royal British Legion. He was predeceased by his wife Eila and his two stepdaughters.

Diana Wynne Jones

16 August 1934 – 26 March 2011

The children’s author Diana Wynne Jones died on 26 March 2011, aged 76. Born in London, she was educated at the Friends’ School, Saffron Walden, and St Anne’s College, Oxford, where she read English and was taught by C S Lewis and J R R Tolkien. Her first novel, Changeover (1970), was written for adults, but most of her subsequent work was written for children. She was particularly noted for her Chrestomanci series, which featured multiple magical worlds, and which enjoyed renewed popularity following the success of J K Rowling’s Harry Potter books. She was survived by her husband, the Chaucerian scholar John Burrow, and by their three sons.

Tim Everton

28 March 1951 – 24 March 2011

Timothy Charles Everton, educationist and innkeeper, died on 24 March 2011, aged 59. He was educated at Queen Mary’s Grammar School, Walsall, and Keble College, Oxford, where he read Mathematics. He then taught Mathematics in schools in Walsall and Shrewsbury before joining the staff of the New University of Ulster then the University of Leicester. In 1992 he moved to Cambridge as deputy principal of Homerton College, becoming the first Dean of Educational Studies in 2001 and Head of the Faculty of Education in 2002. In 2006 he took early retirement, and subsequently he became the landlord of the Phoenix Inn in York, which he transformed into a prize-winning jazz venue. He was survived by his wife Val and their three daughters.

Ian Trafford

8 July 1928 – 24 March 2011

The journalist and newspaper executive Ian Colton Trafford OBE died on 24 March 2011, aged 82. The son of a GP, he was educated at Charterhouse and, after national service in the Intelligence Corps in Palestine, St John’s College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics. On graduating he joined the Financial Times as an industrial correspondent, soon becoming a leader writer and features editor. In 1958 he became a director of Industrial and Trade Fairs Holdings, responsible for organizing British trade fairs across the globe. In 1971 he became managing director of the Economist Intelligence Unit, and from 1981 to 1988 he was chief executive of The Times’s literary, educational and higher education supplements, during which time he returned the titles to financial stability. He was survived by one daughter, his wife Jacqueline having predeceased him.

Wilfred Douglas Halls

11 December 1918 – 23 March 2011

The educationist and historian Wilfred Douglas (WD) Halls died on 23 March 2011, aged 92. Born in London, his education at King’s College, London, was interrupted by war service as an intelligence officer. After completing his degree and an MA in French literature, he studied at Balliol College, Oxford, for a DPhil on the Belgian poet and playwright Maurice Maeterlinck. He taught for three years at the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth, before being appointed in 1959 tutor in educational studies at Oxford, specialising in language teaching. He published a number of books, on education in France, language learning in western Europe, and the history of Vichy France. From 1974 to 1984 he was founding editor of the Oxford Review of Education. He was survived by his wife Pamela and their four children.

Henrietta Llewelyn Davies

12 September 1954 – 15 March 2011

The astrologer Henrietta Llewelyn Davies died on 15 March 2011, aged 56. The daughter of Sylvia Llewelyn Davies and Tom Hopkinson, editor of the Picture Post, she read English at Lady Margaret Hall. She worked briefly in publishing before setting herself up as a ‘psychic astrologer’, offering consultations to a wide range of clients; among those who were convinced of her psychic powers was the novelist Jeanette Winterson. She also wrote horoscope columns for Cosmopolitan, Woman’s Own, TV Times, and other magazines. She was survived by her partner, James Manning.

Mark Kinkead-Weekes

26 April 1931 – 7 March 2011

The literary scholar Marcus (Mark) Kinkead-Weekes FBA died on 7 March 2011, aged 79. Born in South Africa, he was educated at Potchefstroom High School, the University of Cape Town, and (as a Rhodes Scholar) Balliol College, Oxford, where he read English. He spent nine years teaching at the University of Edinburgh before moving to the new University of Kent at Canterbury, where he became Professor of English and American Literature. His work on Samuel Richardson, D H Lawrence, William Golding, and other authors was widely acclaimed. He was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1992. He was survived by his wife Joan and their two sons.

Edward Ullendorff

25 January 1920 – 6 March 2011

Edward Ullendorff FBA, scholar of Semitic languages and Ethiopian culture, died on 6 March 2011, aged 91. Born in Switzerland, he was educated at the Gymnasium Graues Kloster in Berlin and (having left Germany when the Nazi race laws were promulgated) the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. During the Second World War he worked as an administrator in Eritrea. Arriving in Britain, he studied for a DPhil under the auspices of St Catherine’s Society, awarded in 1952. Academic appointments followed at St Andrews, Manchester, and the School of Oriental and African Studies, London, latterly as Professor of Semitic Languages. He published prolifically and fluently on all aspects of Semitic languages and Ethiopian history. He was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1965. He was survived by his wife Dina.

Paul Foote

14 July 1926 – 1 March 2011

The scholar and translator of Russian literature, Paul Foote, died on 1 March 2011, aged 84. Born in Swanage, he attended the local grammar school before wartime and postwar service in the Royal Artillery and (following a Russian course at Cambridge) as an interpreter with the British military mission in Soviet-occupied Germany. On demobilisation he studied Russian and German at St Edmund Hall, Oxford, followed by a diploma in Slavonic Studies. A lectureship in Russian was followed by a fellowship at The Queen’s College, where he remained from 1964 to 1993. He was best known for his scholarly work on Mikhail Saltykov-Shchredin and on nineteenth-century Russian censorship, and for his Penguin Classics translations of Mikhail Lermontov’s A Hero of Our Time (1966) and Leo Tolstoy’s Hadji Murad (1977). He was survived by his three children, his wife Ann having predeceased him in 1968.

Geoffrey Bownas

9 February 1923 – 17 February 2011

Geoffrey Bownas CBE, Japanese expert, died on 17 February 2011, aged 88. Born in Yorkshire, he attended Bradford Grammar School and The Queen’s College, Oxford, where his study of Greats was interrupted by wartime service at Bletchley Park and with the Intelligence Corps in India, in the course of which he learned Japanese. After completing his degree he taught briefly at Aberystwyth before returning to Oxford to take a second degree, in Chinese, and then spent two years at Kyoto University. In 1954 he again returned to Oxford to establish the Department of Japanese Studies. In 1966 he moved to Sheffield in order to establish a Japanese Department there also. He published widely on various aspects of Japanese history, literature, and society, and was co-editor of both The Penguin Book of Japanese Verse and the anthology New Writing in Japan. He was appointed CBE in 2003. He was survived by his wife Wiesia and the two daughters of a previous marriage.

Vivien Noakes

16 February 1937 – 17 February 2011

The biographer and literary scholar Vivien Mary Noakes died on 17 February 2011, aged 74. Born Vivien Langley, the daughter of an aeronautical engineer, she was educated at Dunottar School, Reigate, and (as a mature student) Manchester College, Oxford, where she read English. Much later she returned to Oxford, to Somerville College, where she wrote a DPhil thesis on the poetry of Isaac Rosenberg. Meanwhile, after a stint at the Brewing Industry Research Foundation she had begun a life as a freelance broadcaster and author. Her biography of Edward Lear, concentrating on his activities as a painter and travel writer, was published in 1968. She also published extensively on First World War poetry. She was survived by her husband, Michael Noakes, the portrait painter, with whom she had collaborated on The Daily Life of the Queen (2000), and by their three children.

John Merton

7 May 1913 – 16 February 2011

The portrait painter John Ralph Merton died on 16 February 2011, aged 97. The son of Sir Thomas Merton, Professor of Spectroscopy at Oxford, he was educated at Eton College and Balliol College, Oxford, studying at the Ruskin School of Drawing. During the Second World War he served with the Royal Artillery and the Royal Engineers, working on camouflage, and then headed the Royal Artillery’s photographic interpretation unit. After demobilisation he established himself as one of the leading portrait painters, with a style that owed much to his study of Italian Renaissance portraiture. He was especially known for his triple portraits, including one of Diana, Princess of Wales, exhibited in 1987, which he estimated to have taken some 1,000 hours. He was survived by two daughters, his wife Viola and another daughter having predeceased him.

Paul Marcus

30 May 1954 – 13 February 2011

Paul Coryn Valentine Marcus, theatre, television, and cinema director and producer, died on 13 February 2011, aged 56. The son of the playwright Frank Marcus (author of The Killing of Sister George), he was educated at Latymer Upper School, London, and Lincoln College, Oxford, where he read English. He directed several plays while still an undergraduate. A career in theatre – at the Rock Garden in Covent Garden, the Salisbury Playhouse, the Mermaid and Roundhouse theatres in London, and the Royal Shakespeare Company – was paralleled by work for the BBC and ITV, and several films, including Break Up (1998) and Heidi (2005). He was perhaps best known as the award-winning producer of three series of Prime Suspect, for Granada TV. He was survived by his wife Viviana and their two daughters.

Sir Peter Carey

26 July 1923 – 4 February 2011

Sir Peter Willoughby Carey GCB, civil servant, businessman and banker, died on 4 February 2011, aged 87. Born in Stockwell, London, he was educated at Portsmouth Grammar School, and Oriel College, Oxford, where he read Greats. His studied were interrupted by war service with SOE in Yugoslavia. On completing his degree he joined the Foreign Office but three years later transferred to the Board of Trade. He eventually became Permanent Secretary at the Department of Industry from 1976 to 1983. He was appointed CB in 1972, KCB in 1976, and GCB in 1982. On retiring from the civil service he was for six years chairman of the British conglomerate Dalgety, and from 1987 to 1989 caretaker chairman of the Morgan Grenfell group following the Guinness debacle. He was survived by his wife Thelma and their three daughters.

Antony Kamm

2 March 1931 – 11 February 2011

The publisher and author Antony Kamm died on 11 February 2011, aged 79. The son of George Kamm, the founder of Pan Books, he was educated at Charterhouse and Worcester College, Oxford, where he switched from Greats to English and was a cricket Blue. After graduating he worked for the National Book League, for Brockhampton Press (where he was responsible for acquiring the rights to the Asterix series, translated by his first wife, Anthea Bell), the Commonwealth Secretariat, and Oxford University Press (where he was managing editor for children’s books). He subsequently pursued a career as a freelance author, his books ranging from bestselling surveys of classical and biblical civilisations to an acclaimed biography of John Logie Baird. He was survived by his second wife, Eileen Dunlop, the Scottish children’s author, and the two sons of his first marriage.

Vincent Cronin

24 May 1924 – 25 January 2011

The historian and biographer Vincent Archibald Patrick Cronin died on 25 January 2011, aged 86. Born in Tredegar, the son of a GP, A J Cronin (whose stories later formed the basis of the television series Dr Finlay’s Casebook), he was educated at Ampleforth College and, after war service with the Rifle Brigade, Trinity College, Oxford, where he read Greats. Settling in Normandy with his French wife, he embarked on a career as a successful freelance historian and biographer, particularly noted for his books on the Renaissance and his biographies of Catherine the Great, Louis XIV, Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, and Napoleon. He also wrote travel books, and was general editor of the Companion Guides series (writing the volume on Paris himself). He was survived by his wife Chantal and their five children.

Edmund de Unger

6 August 1918 – 25 January 2011

Edmund de Unger, collector of Islamic art, died on 25 January 2011, aged 92. Born in Budapest, he studied at the universities of Budapest and Kiel, and Hertford College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. He returned to Hungary before the outbreak of war, qualified as a lawyer, took over the management of his family’s properties, and sheltered Jews and socialists from the Nazis. He was at several points interrogated by the Gestapo, and later by the Soviet occupiers. He emigrated to Britain after his family’s property was confiscated. He qualified as a barrister and worked as a legal adviser first at the Colonial Office and then for newly-independent Ghana. After a brief spell with an Italian oil company in the mid-1960s he set up a property development company, which afforded him the means to indulge his passion for collecting Islamic art, including carpets, textiles, ceramics, paintings and books; the published catalogue of his collection ran to five volumes. He was survived by his wife Elisabeth and two sons from his first marriage.

Philip Roussel

17 October 1923 – 22 January 2011

Philip Lyon Roussel OBE, colonial administrator and British Council representative, died on 22 January 2011, aged 87. His parents divorced when he was three, and he was brought up by foster parents. He was educated in Sussex and, after war service with the British army in India, St Edmund Hall, Oxford, where he read English. He joined the Sudan Political Service, serving as a district commissioner in the south of the country until independence in 1954. Thereafter he worked for the British Council for twenty-three years, as head of operations in Bombay, Brussels and Washington, and finally as Controller of Arts, where he introduced business sponsorship of concerts and exhibitions. He retired to Woodstock, where he was active in local arts societies. He was survived by his two children, his wife Elisabeth having predeceased him.

Jack Sewell

20 September 1917 – 22 January 2011

John Alban Fane (Jack) Sewell MC, artillery officer and businessman, died on 22 January 2011, aged 93. Born in Secunderabad, India, where his father was a senior officer in the Indian police, he was educated at Eastbourne College and Jesus College, Oxford, where he read German and French. Commissioned into the Royal Artillery, he took part in the battle of El Alamein, the subsequent campaign in North Africa, and the push through Italy, ending the war as part of the army of occupation in Austria. On demobilisation he joined BP, serving in various postings around the world. His final post was as Secretary-General of the European Gasoil Producers’ Association, in Paris. He then retired to Dorset. He was survived by three children, his wife Peggy having predeceased him.

Reynolds Price

1 February 1933 – 20 January 2011

The American novelist and literary scholar (Edward) Reynolds Price died on 20 January 2011, aged 77. Born and brought up in North Carolina, he was educated at Duke University and (as a Rhodes Scholar) Merton College, Oxford, where he took an MA on Milton’s Samson Agonistes. While still at Oxford he published stories in Encounter. His first novel, A Long and Happy Life (1962), remained in print throughout his life. Other novels followed – often with a female protagonist – while he pursued a parallel career teaching creative writing and literary criticism at Duke University. Homosexual and a devout Christian, he persuaded Duke to allow the solemnisation of gay unions in the university chapel. He was also a frequent broadcaster on the NPR public broadcasting service. He was survived by a brother.

Wilfrid Sheed

27 December 1930 – 19 January 2011

The novelist and critic Wilfrid John Joseph Sheed died on 19 January 2011, aged 80. Born in London of American parents, the Catholic publishers Frank Sheed and Maisie Ward, he was brought up in America before being sent back to England to attend Downside School and Lincoln College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. He subsequently lived mainly in New York, but he described himself as a ‘chronic foreigner’ there and his fiction explored the two cultures of his youth. His first novel, A Middle Class Education (1960), was set in Oxford and depicted the hedonistic lives of undergraduates there. In America he was best known as a literary critic and book reviewer, though each of his nine novels sold respectably. He was survived by his wife Miriam, the three children of his first marriage, and two stepdaughters.

David Bradby

27 February 1942 – 17 January 2011

The theatre scholar David Henry Bradby died on 17 January 2011, aged 68. Born in Ceylon, he was educated at Rugby School and Trinity College, Oxford, where he read French and staged several continental plays. He taught at the University of Glasgow, the University of Kent at Canterbury, where he helped found the Drama Department, and Royal Holloway College, London. He published several books on European, especially French, theatre and translated numerous French plays. He was made a Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in 1997. He was survived by his wife Rachel and their four children.

Brian Boobbyer

25 February 1928 – 17 January 2011

The rugby player and religious campaigner Brian Boobbyer died on 17 January 2011, aged 82. He was educated at Uppingham School and, following national service, Brasenose College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. He won his Blues in cricket and rugby in his first year, and played the first of nine games for the England rugby union team while still an undergraduate. In 1952, however, he gave up his sporting career in order to devote himself full-time to the cause of Moral Re-Armament, which he had discovered at Oxford. He subsequently worked for Moral Re-Armament in Japan, the Philippines, India, and America. He was survived by his wife Juliet and their two sons.

The Earl of Oxford and Asquith

22 April 1916 – 16 January 2011

Julian Edward George (Trim) Asquith, second Earl of Oxford and Asquith KCMG, colonial administrator, died on 16 January 2011, aged 94. The son of Raymond Asquith (who was killed on the Somme five months after his son’s birth) and grandson of H H Asquith, the Liberal Prime Minister, he was educated at Ampleforth College and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Greats. He was by then Earl of Oxford and Asquith, having succeeded his grandfather in 1928. He joined the Royal Engineers in 1941, but was soon seconded to intelligence and diplomatic duties. On demobilisation he joined the Colonial Service, serving in Palestine, Tripolitania, Zanzibar, and St Lucia; his last post was as Governor of the Seychelles, from 1962 to 1967. He was appointed CMG in 1961 and KCMG in 1964. In retirement he wrote reports for the British government on the future of the Cayman Islands and the Turks and Caicos Islands. He was survived by his five children, his wife Anne having predeceased him.

Gerald Stonehill

14 October 1925 – 14 January 2011

Gerald Charles Stonehill, businessman and expert on the Duo-Art piano, died on 14 January 2011, aged 85. Born in Acton to American parents (his father was an antiquarian bookseller), he was educated at Phillips Exeter Academy, New England, and Harvard University, where he read Classics before serving in US Naval Intelligence during the latter part of the Second World War. He then took a second degree, in Russian, at Pembroke College, Oxford, and set up his own company, importing pig iron from Scandinavia. In the late 1950s he first became interested in the Duo-Art piano, an electrically-operated automatic instrument popular from 1913 until the 1930s, which used a roll of perforated paper to reproduce not only notes but pedalling and dynamics. He eventually amassed more than 6,000 Duo-Art rolls, researched every aspect of the instrument, and organised public performances at London concert halls. He was survived by his wife Eileen and their three children.

Gerard Irvine

19 November 1920 – 13 January 2011

Father (John Graham) Gerard Irvine, Church of England priest, died on 13 January 2011, aged 90. The son of a general, he was educated at Haileybury School and Merton College, Oxford, where he switched from Greats to Theology. He then trained at St Stephen’s House, Oxford, and after ordination ministered in Knowle, Bristol; Longton in the Potteries; St Anne’s, Soho; Cranford, near Heathrow; St Cuthbert’s with St Matthew’s, Earl’s Court; and (for seventeen years) St Matthew’s, Westminster. An old-style and colourful Anglo-Catholic, he was a much-loved priest who counted among his congregation and friends numerous politicians, writers, and actors. He retired to Brighton, and lived with his sister Rosemary, who survived him.

John Gross

12 March 1935 – 10 January 2011

John Jacob Gross, editor of the Times Literary Supplement (TLS) from 1974 to 1981, died on 10 January 2011, aged 75. He was educated at the City of London School and Wadham College, Oxford, where he read English. He worked briefly for Gollancz before taking teaching posts at Queen Mary College, London, and King’s College, Cambridge, but in 1965 he returned to London and embarked on a career centred on book reviewing and literary journalism. His editorship of the TLS was much admired, but he had to endure almost continuous industrial unrest and the closure of all the Times titles for eleven months in 1978-9. He was later an editorial consultant to Weidenfeld and Nicolson, chief book reviewer for the New York Times, and theatre critic of the Sunday Telegraph. His books included The Rise and Fall of the Man of Letters (1969), which won the Duff Cooper Memorial Prize, a study of James Joyce (1971), Shylock (1992), and a series of literary anthologies for Oxford University Press. He was survived by his two children, his marriage to the journalist Miriam Gross having ended in divorce.

Brian Simpson

17 August 1931 – 10 January 2011

The legal scholar (Alfred William) Brian Simpson FBA died on 10 January 2011, aged 79. Born in Cumbria, the son of a clergyman, he was educated at Oakham School and, after national service with the Royal West African Frontier Force, The Queen’s College, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence. From 1955 to 1973 he was a Fellow of Lincoln College, with a sabbatical year in 1968-9 spent as Dean of the Faculty of Law at the University of Ghana. His subsequent posts were as Professor of Law at the University of Kent at Canterbury, and at the Universities of Chicago and Michigan in the United States. A leading authority on the common law, his books included Introduction to the History of the Land Law (1961), Cannibalism and the Common Law (1984), Leading Cases in the Common Law (1995), and Human Rights and the End of Empire (2001). He received an Oxford DCL in 1976 and was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1983. He was survived by his wife Caroline, their three children, and the two children of his first marriage.

Bill Robertson

2 February 1917 – 2 January 2011

Lieutenant-Colonel William Thomas (Bill) Robertson MC CBE, head of the Australian Secret Intelligence Service (ASIS) from 1968 to 1975, died on 2 January 2011, aged 93. Born in Melbourne, he was educated at Melbourne Grammar School and Wadham College, Oxford, where he read Mathematics. During the Second World War he served with Australian forces in North Africa, Greece, the Pacific, and (landing in Normandy on D Day) north-west Europe. After demobilisation he worked in the steel industry for five years before being recruited in 1952 as first deputy director of the new Australian secret service, becoming head in 1968. He was sacked in controversial circumstances by Gough Whitlam, following revelations of ASIS collusion with the CIA in Chile and the misleading of the Australian parliament regarding intelligence operations in East Timor, but he was subsequently vindicated by a government enquiry and appointed CBE. He later headed the new service tasked with co-ordinating the work of federal and state security agencies. He was survived by his two children, his wife Jean having predeceased him.