Louis Armstrong

4 September 1946 – 31 December 2014

Rear-Admiral John Herbert Arthur James (Louis) Armstrong CBE died on 31 December 2014, aged 68. Born in Fowey, Cornwall, he was a music scholar at King’s School, Canterbury, before entering the Britannia Royal Naval College, Dartmouth. It was his proficiency on the trumpet that earned him the nickname ‘Louis’. Subsequently, as a naval officer, he read Jurisprudence at Magdalen College, Oxford, and was called to the bar by the Middle Temple in 1976. His early seagoing appointments included as deputy supply officer of the Royal Yacht Britannia; he also spent time on secondment to the Cabinet Office. His final naval appointments were as commandant of the Royal Naval Staff College, Greenwich, then senior naval directing staff of the Royal College of Defence Studies. After retiring from the Royal Navy he spent twelve successful years as chief executive of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors. He was survived by his wife Miriam (Mimi) and by the two children of his first marriage.

 

Fran Prichard

30 October 1925 – 31 December 2014

Francis Hesketh (Fran) Prichard, schoolmaster, died on 31 December 2014, aged 89. Born in Assam, India, the son of an officer in the Indian Civil Service, he was educated at Marlborough College and, after war service with the Royal Navy on Arctic convoys, Brasenose College, Oxford, where he took the war-shortened course in modern history, graduating in 1948. After teaching for a few years at Summer Fields he joined the staff of St Edward’s School, Oxford, in 1952, and remained there for the remainder of his career, as a history and Latin teacher and housemaster of Sing’s. He was later secretary of the old boys’ society and appeal director. He was survived by his two sons and a stepdaughter, his wife Pat, a war widow, having predeceased him.

 

The Duke of Wellington

2 July 1915 – 31 December 2014

(Arthur) Valerian Wellesley, eighth Duke of Wellington KG, LVO, OBE, MC, DL, died on 31 December 2014, aged 99. He was born in Rome, the son of Lord Gerard Wellesley, author, diplomat and architect, and his wife, the author (and close friend of Vita Sackville-West) Dottie Ashton. His father was the third son of the fourth Duke; he became the seventh Duke in 1943 when his nephew was killed with the Commandos at Salerno, and Wellesley at that point became Marquess of Douro (succeeding his father as duke in 1972). Wellesley was educated at Eton and New College, Oxford, here he read Modern Languages and was a member of the Bullingdon Club, but failed his finals. Commissioned into the Royal Horse Guards, he served in Palestine, Iraq and Syria, where he earned his MC. He remained in the army until 1968, with the Household Cavalry and the Royal Armoured Corps, retiring with the rank of brigadier. He then devoted himself to managing his estate, and to a wide range of charitable activities. He was survived by four sons and a daughter, his wife Diana having predeceased him.

 

Edward Nugee

9 August 1928 – 30 December 2014

Edward George Nugee QC, barrister, died on 30 December 2014, aged 86. The son of an army officer, he was educated at Radley College and, after national service in the Royal Artillery, Worcester College, Oxford, where he read jurisprudence, graduating in 1952, and won the Eldon Scholarship the following year. He was called to the bar by the Inner Temple in 1955. Practising at the Chancery Bar, he specialised in property law (especially landlord and tenant cases), charity law, ecclesiastical law, and pension law, contributing to legal journals and editing new editions of some of the standard works in these areas. As head of Wilberforce Chambers, he oversaw its growth from 10 to 45 members, including 18 QCs. He was made a bencher of the Inner Temple in 1976 and treasurer in 1996, and served on numerous advisory and professional bodies. He was survived by his wife Rachel and their four sons, one of whom, Sir Christopher Nugee, is a High Court judge.

 

Andrew Thomson

26 January 1936 – 26 December 2014

Andrew William John Thomson OBE, business academic, died on 26 December 2014, aged 78. The son of an ICI engineer, he was educated at St Bees School, Cumbria, and, after national service in the Royal Artillery, St Edmund Hall, Oxford, where he read philosophy, politics and economics, graduating in 1959. He went on to study for a Master’s in industrial relations at Cornell University and in 1961 joined Lever Brothers as a brand manager. In 1965 he returned to Cornell to work on a PhD, awarded in 1968. From 1968 to 1987 he taught at Glasgow University, where he was dean of the Scottish Business School; then from 1988 to 2001 he was Professor of Management at the Open University. He wrote a large number of books and articles on industrial relations, personnel management, and the history of management and management theories and education. He lived in New Zealand in retirement, and was survived by his third wife, Angela Bowey, a former Professor of Business Administration at the University of Strathclyde, and the two sons of his first marriage.

 

Kate Gross

10 July 1978 – 25 December 2014

Kate Elizabeth Gross OBE, civil servant and charity director, died on 25 December 2014, aged 36. The daughter of a water engineer and a child psychologist, she spent her earliest years in the Middle East before the family settled in Bath. She was educated there and in Bradford-on-Avon and at Keble College, Oxford, where she read English. On graduation she joined the Home Office, but was soon seconded to the Cabinet Office and the European Commission, and in 2004 she became the Prime Minister’s private secretary for parliamentary and home affairs. She left the civil service soon after Tony Blair’s resignation, and after a master’s degree in international relations at St John’s College, Cambridge, became chief executive of the Africa Governance Initiative, founded by Blair. She was diagnosed with cancer of the colon in 2012, and wrote movingly about coming to terms with the illness in a series of articles for The Times. She was survived by her husband Billy and their twin sons.

 

Christopher Davidge

5 November 1929 – 22 December 2014

Christopher Guy Vere Davidge, farmer, oarsman and sports administrator, died on 22 December 2014, aged 85. The son of Cecil Davidge, law fellow and bursar of Keble College, and treasurer of the University Boat Club, he was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Oxford, where he read jurisprudence, graduating in 1952, and competing in three Boat Races (including those of 1951, when Oxford sank two minutes into the race, and 1952, when Oxford won by a margin in a snowstorm). He competed in three Olympics and held various senior posts in the rowing and Olympic movements, including as national selector, rowing team manager, and president of the Amateur Rowing Association, in which capacity he refused Margaret Thatcher’s call for a boycott of the 1980 Olympic Games in Moscow. While not involved in sporting commitments he tended the family estate near Northampton. He was survived by his second wife, Jill.

 

Alan Williams

14 October 1930 – 21 December 2014

Alan John Williams PC, politician, died on 21 December 2014, aged 84. The son of a miner, he was educated at Cardiff High School, Cardiff College of Technology, and University College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1956. After national service in the RAF he became a lecturer at the Welsh College of Advanced Technology. He contested Poole for Labour before becoming Labour MP for Swansea West in 1964, holding the seat until 2010. He held various junior ministerial posts under Harold Wilson and Jim Callaghan, and was a frontbench spokesman on Wales and other portfolios in opposition in 1970-4 and again from 1979 until 1989. Thereafter he was a much respected backbencher and member of various Commons committees; from 2005 to 2010 he was Father of the House. He was survived by his wife Mary and their three children.

 

John Freeman

19 February 1915 – 20 December 2014

John Freeman MBE, PC, politician, journalist, diplomat and television executive, died on 20 December 2014, aged 99. The son of a barrister, he was educated at Westminster School and Brasenose College, Oxford, where he read Literae Humaniores, graduating in 1937. He worked as a copywriter for an advertising agency before joining the Coldstream Guards on the outbreak of the Second World War. Commissioned into the Rifle Brigade, he served in north Africa, Italy, and north-west Europe, and witnessed the German surrender at Lüneberg Heath; his MBE was a military one. In a notably varied career he was Labour MP for Watford from 1945 to 1955, serving as a junior minister until 1951 (when, a Bevanite, he resigned in protest at the introduction of NHS charges); a journalist with the New Statesman (and editor from 1961 to 1965) and broadcaster (notably as interviewer on the BBC series Face to Face); British High Commissioner in India from 1965 to 1968, then British Ambassador to Washington from 1969 to 1971; chairman of London Weekend Television from 1971 to 1984; and Visiting Professor of International Relations at the University of California, Davis, from 1985 to 1990. He was survived by his fourth wife, Judith, their two daughters, and by four children of his earlier marriages.

 

Colin Strang

12 June 1922 – 19 December 2014

The philosopher Colin Strang, second Baron Strang, died on 19 December 2014. Born in Belgrade, the son of Wlliam Strang, later first Baron Strang (having served as permanent under-secretary of the Foreign Office), he was educated at Merchant Taylors’ School and St John’s College, Oxford; after classical Moderations in 1942 he was called up for service with the Royal Artillery, serving in north-west Europe, before returning to graduate in literae humaniores in 1947. He followed this with a BPhil in 1951. After two years at Queen’s University, Belfast, he moved to King’s College, Newcastle, later the University of Newcastle, where he was a Professor of Philosophy from 1975 to 1982. He published relatively little, but some of his papers were widely cited and became much anthologised. He succeeded his father in 1978 but played little part in the House of Lords. He was survived by Caroline, the daughter of his second marriage, his second and third wives having predeceased him.

 

Martin Brasier

12 April 1947 – 16 December 2014

Martin David Brasier, palaeobiologist, died on 16 December 2014, aged 67. Born in Wimbledon, he was educated at Oxford and the University of London, where he took his PhD. He taught at Reading and Hull universities before returning to Oxford as tutorial fellow of St Edmund Hall and lecturer in geology in 1988. He was made a reader in earth sciences in 1996 and Professor of Palaeobiology from 1992 to 2013. He was particularly noted for his work on microfossils and the earliest forms of life; in 2011 he and David Wacey published a paper claiming to have found microfossils of sulphur-metabolising microbes in rocks 3.4 billion years old. In 2013 he won the Geological Society of London’s Lyell Medal. He died in a car accident near Burford and was survived by his wife Cecilia and their three children.

 

Anthony Bottrall

15 May 1938 – 16 December 2014

Anthony Bottrall, diplomat, development adviser and local councillor, died on 16 December 2014, aged 76. Born in Florence, the son of Ronald Bottrell, poet and British Council official, and Margaret Bottrall, literary scholar and founding fellow of Lucy Cavendish College, Cambridge, he was educated at Winchester College and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he graduated in literae humaniores in 1960. He spent several years as a diplomat, serving in Belgrade, Jakarta and Singapore before returning to Oxford to take a diploma in agricultural economics. He subsequently worked for many years for the Overseas Development Institute and the Ford Foundation, overseeing large irrigation, flood defence and other development projects before becoming a freelance development consultant in 1990. From 1994 to 2006 he was a Liberal Democrat councillor in Lambeth. He was survived by his wife Ingeborg and their three children.

 

Michael Hare Duke

28 November 1925 – 15 December 2014

The Rt Rev Michael Geoffrey Hare Duke, Bishop of St Andrews from 1969 to 1994, died on 15 December 2014, aged 89. Born in Calcutta, the son of a railway engineer, he was educated at Bradfield College and, after war service in the Royal Navy, Trinity College, Oxford, where after taking a first degree in literae humaniores in 1949 he graduated in theology the following year. Completing his training at Westcott House, Cambridge, he was curate of St John’s Wood Church, vicar of St Mark’s, Bury, pastoral director of the Theological Association, and vicar of St Paul’s, Daybrook, before becoming Bishop of St Andrews, Dunkeld and Dunblane. He was noted for his opposition to the Falklands War and his support for the ordination of women, as well as for a stream of books and other publications on topics as diverse as pastoral care, Freud, and adolescence. He was survived by four children, his wife Grace having predeceased him.

 

Simon Sedgwick-Jell

19 May 1950 – 14 December 2014

Simon Sedgwick-Jell, local government politician, died on 14 December 2014, aged 64. Born in Ethiopia, the son of a diplomat, he was educated at Stonyhurst College, and St Peter’s College, Oxford, where he read modern history. After a teaching post at Leicester University he moved to Cambridge, where he taught at Anglia Polytechnic (subsequently Anglia Ruskin University). He was elected to Cambridge city council as a Labour councillor in 1983 and became leader of the council in 1990, but stood down from the council in 1995 and resigned from the Labour Party the following year, citing disagreement with Tony Blair’s brand of ‘new Labour’. After a spell in the Socialist Alliance he joined the Green Party, and in 2009 became a county councillor standing for that party. He was also active in several voluntary organisations. He was survived by his wife Hilary and their three sons, and by his partner, Alison.

 

Catherine Hughes

24 September 1933 – 10 December 2014

Catherine Eva Hughes (née Pestell) CMG, diplomat and Principal of Somerville College, Oxford, from 1989 to 1996, died on 10 December 2012, aged 81. She was educated at Leeds Grammar School and St Hilda’s College, Oxford, where she read modern history, graduating in 1955. In 1956 she joined the Foreign Office, and served in The Hague, Bangkok, Paris, East Berlin, and Bonn before becoming assistant under-secretary of state from 1987 to 1989. She had a spell as a visiting fellow at St Antony’s College, Oxford, in 1974-5. As Principal of Somerville College he oversaw the introduction of male fellows in 1993, followed the next year by male undergraduates. She also, in 1991, married the neuropathologist Trevor Hughes, who was acting Warden of Green College, next door to Somerville. He survived her.

 

Jeremy Thorpe

29 April 1929 – 4 December 2014

(John) Jeremy Thorpe PC, leader of the Liberal Party from 1967 to 1976, died on 4 December 2014, aged 85. The son of J. H. Thorpe, barrister and Conservative MP, he was educated at Eton and Trinity College Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence, and was president of the Union, graduating in 1952. He was called to the bar by the Inner Temple in 1954. Already active in Liberal politics, he contested North Devon in 1955, and won the seat in 1959, holding it until the general election of 1979. He became treasurer of the Liberal Party Organisation for two years before becoming leader. As leader, he led the Liberal Party to its highest level of electoral success since 1945, with six million votes in the February 1974 election, albeit this resulted in only 14 MPs (declining to 13 in the general election of October that year). He was brought down by the Norman Scott scandal, which began with allegations of homosexual relations between Thorpe and Scott, and ended with Thorpe’s acquittal on charges of incitement to murder, after a bruising trial. Thereafter he remained out of the limelight. He was survived by the son of his first marriage, both his wives having predeceased him.

 

Lady Kennet

14 April 1923 – 30 November 2014

Elizabeth Ann Young (née Adams), Lady Kennet, died on 30 November 2014, aged 91. Born in London, the daughter of a naval officer, she was educated in Geneva (where her father served with the League of Nations), at Downe House, and at Somerville College, Oxford, where she took the war-shortened course in Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1943. In 1948 she married Wayland Young, who was to succeed his father as Lord Kennet in 1960 and serve as a Labour junior minister. They had a son and five daughters, but her large family did not prevent her from enjoying a considerable career of her own as an author of seven books and a large number of articles for magazines and learned journals, particularly on her two main interests, defence (an interest inherited from her father) and architecture. Her book with Wayland Young, Old London Churches (1956), was especially influential, and she was a key figure in the movement to preserve Nicholas Hawksmoor’s London churches. She was survived by her six children, her husband having died in 2009.

 

Lady Juliet Townsend

9 September 1941 – 29 November 2014

Lady Juliet Margaret Townsend (née Smith) DCVO, public servant and author, died on 29 November 2014, aged 73. The daughter of Freddy Smith, second Earl of Birkenhead, historian and biographer, she was educated at Westonbirt School in Gloucestershire and Somerville College, Oxford, where she read English, graduating in 1963. From 1965 until 2002 she was a discreet lady-in-waiting to Princess Margaret. In 1968 she wrote the Northamptonshire volume for the Shell County Guides (edited by John Betjeman), and in 1971 she published a children’s novel, Escape from Meerut; later she reviewed children’s books for The Spectator. After her marriage in 1970 to John Townsend she became firmly rooted in the county of Northamptonshire and closely involved with a variety of local causes; she and her husband also ran a bookshop, and later also a butcher’s. She was Lord-Lieutenant of Northamptonshire from 1998 until June 2014, and was made a DCVO in October 2014. She was survived by her husband and their three daughters.

 

Brenda Horsfield

18 January 1926 – 25 November 2014

(Catharine Margaret) Brenda Horsfield, née Barnard, pilot and television producer, died on 25 November 2014, aged 88. Her father, a civil servant, died when she was young and she took the surname of her stepfather, a pilot. Educated at Cheltenham Ladies’ College and Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, where she read English, she became an acting pilot officer in the Women’s Royal Air Force Voluntary Reserve, and retained a lifelong love of flying, becoming an expert glider pilot. Meanwhile she worked in publishing and journalism before becoming a distinguished BBC television producer, researching and producing mainly educational television series. She was at one point chair of the Women’s Pilots’ Association, and continued gliding until a few months before her death.

 

Rebecca Farnworth

24 May 1965 – 24 November 2014

Rebecca Jane Farnworth, writer, died on 24 November 2014, aged 49. The daughter of a circuit judge, she was educated at the Dame Alice Harpur School in Bedford, Royal Holloway College, University of London, and Keble College, Oxford, where she took a postgraduate certificate in education. After teaching for a year she joined the BBC’s Continuing Education Department, then turned freelance writer for such magazines as Cosmopolitan. In 2003 she began a long collaboration with Katie Price, the glamour model formerly known as Jordan, whose ten novels and five volumes of autobiography she ghost-wrote. She also published three novels of her own. She was survived by her husband Julian and their three children.

 

Roger Magraw

18 June 1943 – 23 November 2014

The historian Roger William Magraw died on 23 November 2014, aged 71. Born in Birmingham, the son of a civil servant, he was brought up in Watford. He read Modern History at Worcester College, Oxford, graduating in 1965. After a brief spell teaching at the University of Leeds, he joined the staff of the new Warwick University in 1968, remaining there until his retirement. Strongly influenced by Marxism, he was best known for his work on nineteenth-century France, and especially the French working class of that period. He received the Ordre des Palmes Academiques in recognition of his work. He was survived by a daughter and a step-daughter, his marriage having ended in separation.

 

Margaret Aston

9 October 1932 – 22 November 2014

The historian Margaret Evelyn Aston, née Bridges, CBE, FBA, died on 22 November 2014, aged 82. The daughter of the civil servant Edward Bridges, Lord Bridges, and granddaughter of Robert Bridges, the poet laureate, she was educated at Downe House and Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, where she read Modern History, graduating in 1954. The same year she married the historian Trevor Aston; the marriage ended in divorce but she retained his name as an author. After a DPhil on Thomas Arundel, Archbishop of Canterbury, her subsequent work ranged widely across late medieval history, and she was especially known for her work on the Lollards, and on England’s Iconoclasts (1988), which traced laws relating to idolatry against the background of reactions to images in the practice of religion from medieval times to the Civil War. She was a lecturer at St Anne’s College, Oxford, from 1956 to 1959, and at various points held research fellowships at other universities, but no regular academic post; she was elected an FBA in 1994. Her second husband, the diplomat Paul Buxton, predeceased her, as did one of their two daughters.

 

Roy Bhaskar

15 May 1944 – 19 November 2014

Roy Bhaskar, philosopher, died on 19 November 2014, aged 70. Born in Teddington, the son of an Indian father and an English mother, he was educated in London and at Balliol College, Oxford, where he read philosophy, politics and economics, graduating in 1966, and in 1974 being awarded a BLitt for his thesis on ‘A realist theory of science’ (published as his first book the following year). He held a succession of part-time posts at Pembroke College, Oxford, the universities of Edinburgh and Sussex, the University of Tromsø in Norway, and latterly the Institute of Education in London, and was a much-loved teacher. His philosophical work, characterised successively as ‘transcendental realism’, ‘critical naturalism’ and ‘critical realism’, latterly with a ‘spiritual turn’, lay outside the mainstream of academic philosophy but won him a number of admirers and followers. He was survived by his partner, Rebecca.

 

Jon Stallworthy

18 January 1935 – 19 November 2014

Jonathan Howie Stallworthy FBA, publisher, poet, and literary scholar, died on 19 November 2014, aged 79. Born in Kew, the son of Sir John Stallworthy, the eminent New Zealand-born obstetrician and gynaecologist, he was educated at the Dragon School in Oxford, Rugby School, and, after national service in Nigeria, Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read English, graduating in 1958 and taking a BLitt in 1964. In 1959 he joined Oxford University Press, becoming deputy head of the academic division in 1975-7 before crossing into academia, first as John Wendell Anderson Professor of English Literature at Cornell University then, from 1986, a fellow of Wolfson College, Oxford (and from 1992 to 2000 Professor of English Literature). He published around a dozen volumes of his own poetry, edited or translated a large number of collections and anthologies, and was especially known for his scholarly work on Wilfred Owen and Louis MacNiece. He was elected an FBA in 1990. He was survived by his three children, his wife Jill having predeceased him.

 

Paul Vaughan

24 October 1925 – 14 November 2014

The broadcaster Paul William Vaughan died on 14 November 2014, aged 89. Born in Brixton, the son of the secretary of the Linoleum and Floorcloth Manufacturers’ Association, he was educated at Raynes Park County School and Wadham College, Oxford, where he read English. His studies were interrupted by war and postwar service with the Queen’s Royal Regiment, but he returned to Oxford to complete his degree in 1949. He worked as an assistant export manager for a firm of pharmaceutical chemists and then as assistant public relations officer for the BMA before embarking on a career as a freelance journalist and broadcaster. He was best known as presenter of the Radio 4 arts magazine Kaleidoscope and narrator of the BBC2 science series Horizon; he was also in constant demand for television and film commercials. He published two volumes of memoirs, Something in Linoleum (1992) and Exciting Times in the Accounts Department (1995). He was survived by his wife Pippa, their two sons, and the four children of his first marriage.

 

Sir William Dugdale

29 March 1922 – 13 November 2014

Sir William Straford (Bill) Dugdale, second baronet, CBE, MC, landowner, businessman, jockey and horse breeder, died on 13 November 2014, aged 92. The son of the first baronet, landowner and colliery owner, he was educated at Eton and Balliol College, Oxford, where he was active in Conservative politics but left to join the army without taking a degree. During the Second World War he served with the Grenadier Guards in north Africa and Italy. On demobilisation he qualified as a solicitor before taking over the management of the family estate; he was also a director of numerous companies, and founding chairman of Severn Trent Water. In his career as a jockey he took part in the 1952 Grand National, and rode nine winners in other races; he was more successful as a horse breeder. He was also chairman of Aston Villa Football Club. He was survived by his wife Cecilia (Cylla, David Cameron’s maternal aunt), their two children, and the four children of his first marriage, which had ended with his wife Belinda’s death.

 

Bernard Stonehouse

1 May 1926 – 12 November 2014

Bernard Stonehouse, polar scientist, died on 12 November 2014, aged 88. Born in Hull, he was educated there before joining the Fleet Air Arm in 1944 and training as a pilot. In 1946 he joined the Falkland Islands Dependency Survey (later the British Antarctic Survey), spending the next three winters in the Antarctic. He then read Zoology and Geology at University College, London, followed by research at Merton College, Oxford; he was awarded a DPhil in 1957 for a thesis on breeding behaviour in king penguins. His subsequent academic career took him to the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand; Yale; the University of British Columbia, and Bradford University, where he set up the School of Environmental Science. From 1982 to 1992 he was editor of the Polar Record, based in Cambridge. He himself wrote prolifically, including many popular as well as academic books, primarily on penguins and Antarctica; he was also a lecturer on board tourist ships. He was survived by his wife Sally and their three children, and is commemorated in Stonehouse Bay and Mount Stonehouse, both in Antarctica.

 

Sir Thomas Macpherson

4 October 1920 – 6 November 2014

Obituaries 2014 – Tommy Macpherson

Sir (Ronald) Thomas Stewart Macpherson CBE, MC, soldier and businessman, died on 6 November 2014, aged 94. Born in Edinburgh, the fifth son of Sir Thomas Stewart Macpherson, of the Indian Civil Service, he was educated at Fettes College before enlisting with the Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders in 1939. Joining the Commandos the following year, he was captured during an abortive attempt to kidnap General Rommel in north Africa, but escaped from prison camp in Germany and returned to Britain via Sweden, being awarded an MC for his daring escape. He won two bars to the medal, the first for operations with SOE and the Resistance in France (including forcing the surrender of some 23,000 Wehrmacht troops) and then with the partisans in northern Italy. After the war he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics at Trinity College, Oxford, winning an athletics Blue and graduating in 1947. He was later, for some forty years, president of the Achilles Club. After leaving Oxford he worked for the timber company William Mallinson and Sons, becoming managing director from 1967 to 1981; he also held a large number of other directorships. He was knighted for services to commerce in 1992. He was survived by his wife Jean and their two children. Tommy Macpherson spoke to Oxford Today in 2011 about his wartime exploits.

 

Sir Anthony Reeve

20 October 1938 – 6 November 2014

Sir Anthony Reeve KCMG, KCVO, diplomat, died on 6 November 2014, aged 76. Born in Yorkshire, he was educated at Queen Elizabeth Grammar School, Wakefield, Marling School in Stroud, and Merton College, Oxford, where he read English, graduating in 1961. He worked for Lever Brothers for three years before joining the Diplomatic Service. Trained as an Arabist at the Middle East Centre for Arab Studies, he served in Abu Dhabi, Washington and Cairo before becoming head of the Southern African Department in 1984 and assistant under secretary of state (Africa) in 1986. He was then ambassador to Jordan (1988-91) and ambassador then (after the country’s return to the Commonwealth) high commissioner to South Africa (1991-6), in which post he developed a close working relationship with Nelson Mandela. He was appointed KCMG in 1992 and KCVO in 1995. He was survived by his wife Susan and by the three children of his first marriage.

 

Sir Henry Harris

28 January 1925 – 31 October 2014

Sir Henry Harris FRS, FRCP, FRCPath, Regius Professor of Medicine in the University of Oxford and student of Christ Church from 1979 to 1992, died on 31 October 2014, aged 89. Born in Russia to Jewish parents who emigrated to Australia when he was four, he was educated at Sydney Boys’ High School and the University of Sydney, where he read modern languages then medicine. After qualifying in 1950 he took a DPhil at Lincoln College, Oxford, in 1954. For the next five years he was director of research for the British Empire Cancer Campaign at the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, Oxford. He then spent a year at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, and three years as head of the Department of Cell Biology at the John Innes Institute before returning to Oxford in 1963 as Professor of Pathology and head of the Sir William Dunn School. He was widely acclaimed for his work on cell development and especially the development of cancerous tumours, and was elected an FRS in 1968 and knighted in 1993. He wrote several books, including key texts on cell development. He was survived by his wife Alexandra and their three children.

 

D C Watt

17 May 1928 – 30 October 2014

The historian Donald Cameron Watt FBA died on 30 October 2014, aged 86. He was educated at Rugby School (where his father was a housemaster) and, after national service in the Intelligence Corps in Austria, Oriel College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1951. He worked for three years at the Foreign Office as an assistant editor of the Documents on German Foreign Policy series before joining the staff of the London School of Economics, where he remained until his retirement in 1993, from 1972 as titular professor and from 1981 as Stevenson Professor of International History. His published work ranged widely over twentieth-century international relations, but he was perhaps best known for his book How War Came (1989), on the origins of the Second World War. He was elected an FBA in 1990, received an Oxford DLitt in 1991, and was made an honorary fellow of Oriel College in 1998. He was survived by a son and a stepdaughter, both his wives having predeceased him.

 

David Trendell

17 August 1964 – 28 October 2014

David Robin Charles (Trixie) Trendell, choral director, died on 28 October 2014, aged 50. Born in Norfolk, he was a chorister at Norwich Cathedral, where in 1978 he recorded Mendelssohn’s ‘O For the Wings of a Dove’, before winning an organ scholarship to Exeter College, Oxford. He then became assistant organist at Winchester Cathedral and organist at the University Church of St Mary the Virgin, Oxford, before in 1992 becoming director of music at King’s College, London. Under his direction the chapel choir won an international reputation, especially in Renaissance music; he was himself a noted authority on the music of William Byrd. A high-church Anglican, he was also director of music at St Bartholomew the Great in the City of London, then of St Mary’s, Bourne Street. He was unmarried.

 

Sir Ronald Grierson

6 August 1921 – 23 October 2014

Sir Ronald Hugh Grierson, banker and industrialist, died on 23 October 2014, aged 93. Born Rolf Hans Griessmann in Nuremberg, the son of an industrialist, he moved with his family to Paris after Hitler’s accession to power, and then to London in 1936, and was educated at Highgate School and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics. During the Second World War he was interned for a short while before transferring to the Pioneer Corps, with whom he laid drains in the Cotswolds alongside Arthur Koestler. Finally allowed to join the forces, he served with the Parachute Regiment and the SAS. After the war he worked briefly for The Economist and for the UN Economic Commission for Europe before joining Warburg & Co. From the 1970s he took on a wide range of directorships, chairmanships, and public service appointments; he was vice-chairman of GEC from 1968 to 1991, and chairman of the South Bank Board from 1984 to 1990. He was survived by a son and a step-daughter, his wife Heather having predeceased him.

 

John Postgate

24 June 1922 – 22 October 2014

John Raymond Postgate FRS, microbiologist, died on 22 October 2014, aged 92. Born in London, the son of Raymond Postgate, the historian and founder of the Good Food Guide, and his wife Daisy, daughter of George Lansbury, he was educated at Woodstock School in Golders Green, Kingsbury County School, and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Chemistry, graduating in 1945. He went on to do research in chemical microbiology, initially at the Chemical Research Laboratory in Teddington, then at the University of Sussex, where he became Professor of Microbiology from 1965 until his retirement in 1987. His main specialism was bacteria that live in extreme conditions (such as extreme heat or cold, ultra high pressure, or ultra-salty environments). His book Microbes and Man (1969) went into its fourth edition in 2000. He was also a noted expert on and enthusiastic player of jazz music. He was elected an FRS in 1977. He was survived by his three daughters, his wife Mary having predeceased him.

 

Sir Christopher France

2 April 1934 – 21 October 2014

Sir Christopher Walter France GCB, civil servant, died on 21 October 2014, aged 80. He was educated at East Ham Grammar School and New College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1957. After teaching for a year he joined the civil service, serving in the Treasury until 1984, including spells as private secretary to chancellors of the exchequer Anthony Barber and Denis Healey and on secondment to the Electricity Council and the Ministry of Defence. He moved to the Department of Health and Social Security in 1984, becoming permanent secretary in 1987 and overseeing its division into the departments of Health and Social Security in 1988. He was subsequently permanent secretary of the Department of Health until 1992, when he took over as permanent secretary of the Ministry of Defence until his retirement in 1995. He was knighted KCB in 1989 and advanced to GCB in 1994. He was survived by his wife Valerie, headmistress of City of London School for Girls, and their two children.

 

John Andrew

10 January 1931 – 17 October 2014

Canon John Gerald Barton Andrew, Church of England clergyman, died on 17 October 2014, aged 83. Born in Scarborough, he read Theology at Keble College, Oxford, after national service in the RAF, graduating in 1955. Ordained by the future Archbishop Michael Ramsey the following year, he became Ramsey’s chaplain at York for a year before following him to Lambeth from 1961 to 1969; the closeness of his relationship to Ramsey was not always welcome to more senior clergy. Denied preferment in England, from 1972 to 1996 he was rector of the fashionable and wealthy St Thomas’s, Fifth Avenue, New York, where his enjoyment of high society and fine living were indulged to the full. He never married.

 

Hermione Hobhouse

2 February 1934 – 17 October 2014

(Mary) Hermione Hobhouse MBE, architectural historian, died on 17 October 2014, aged 80. Born in Somerset, the daughter of Sir Arthur Lawrence Hobhouse, Liberal politician, she was educated at Cheltenham Ladies’ College and Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, where she read Modern History, graduating in 1954. From 1957 to 1965 she worked as a researcher and writer for independent television, before leaving to devote herself to writing and teaching at the Architectural Association School. She was secretary of the Victorian Society from 1977 to 1982, and general editor of the Survey of London from 1983 to 1994. Among her many books were an acclaimed biography of the master builder Thomas Cubitt (1971), and Lost London (also 1971), a pictorial survey of demolished London architecture. She was survived by two children, her marriage to the architect Henry Graham having ended in divorce.

 

Richard Ninis

25 October 1931 – 15 October 2014

The Venerable Richard Betts Ninis, churchman, died on 15 October 2014, aged 82. The son of a Somerset farmer, he read Agriculture at Lincoln College, Oxford, graduating in 1953, but then prepared for ordination at Lincoln Theological College. He served as curate at All Saints, Poplar, then vicar of St Mark’s, Hereford, the latter a multi-parish benefice. He was diocesan missioner for Hereford from 1971 to 1974, then archdeacon of Lichfield and treasurer of Lichfield Cathedral from 1974 to 1998; in this position he was centrally involved in radical pastoral reorganisation and the creation of team ministries. He retired to Somerset, and was survived by his wife Jane and their three children.

 

Michael Wolfers

28 September 1938 – 15 October 2014

Michael Wolfers, journalist and political activist, died on 15 October 2014, aged 76. He read Jurisprudence at Wadham College, Oxford, graduating in 1962, before embarking on a career as a journalist, initially in provincial papers, but soon moving to The Times, where he specialised in African affairs. He left the paper in 1973 to work for the Marxist MPLA government in Angola, and wrote Angola in the Frontline (1983) with Jane Bergerol. Fluent in Portuguese, he also became a noted commentator on Mozambique. Based subsequently in West Africa, he was a prolific writer and translator of books about Africa, and latterly especially a translator of African poems. He died while attending a birthday party at the Garrick Club for his friend and Oxford contemporary Melvyn (Lord) Bragg.

 

Chelly Halsey

13 April 1923 – 14 October 2014

Albert Henry (Chelly) Halsey FBA, sociologist, died on 14 October 2014, aged 91. Born in Kentish Town, the second of nine children of a railway worker, he was brought up in Rutland and Northamptonshire, and was educated at Kettering Grammar School, leaving at the age of sixteen to become a sanitary inspector’s apprentice. During the Second World War he served in the RAF, and took advantage of a servicemen’s grant to study at the London School of Economics. After posts at Liverpool and Birmingham universities he became head of Barnett House, Oxford’s department of social and administrative studies, and a professorial fellow of Nuffield College, where he remained until and after his retirement in 1990. He was best known for his work on the sociology of education, and for his advocacy of comprehensive education and the abolition of public schools; he was an adviser to the Secretary of State for Education, first Anthony Crosland then Patrick Gordon Walker, from 1965 to 1968. His work ranged more widely, however, and he published important books on the sociology of class, ethical socialism, and the history of sociology. He was elected an FBA in 1995. He was survived by his five children, his wife Margaret having predeceased him.

 

Ali Mazrui

24 February 1933 – 13 October 2014

The historian and political scientist Ali Al’Amin Mazrui died on 13 October 2014, aged 81. Born in Mombasa, Kenya, the son of an Islamic scholar, he took his BA at Manchester University, his MA at Columbia University, New York, and his DPhil at Nuffield College, Oxford, in 1966 for a thesis on ‘the idea of self-government and the idiom of nationalism in some Commonwealth Africa countries’. The twin themes of democracy and nationalism featured in much of his prolific output as a scholar. He taught at Makerere University until political circumstances forced him to move to the US in 1974; there he was professor at Michigan and Cornell universities, and latterly at the State University of New York, Binghamton. He was best known among a wider public for writing and presenting the nine-part television series, The Africans (1986). He was survived by his wife Pauline, their two sons, and three sons from his first marriage.

 

Eric Korn

6 November 1933 – 7 October 2014

(Michael) Eric Korn, antiquarian bookseller, died on 7 October 2014, aged 80. Born in London, the son of a jeweller, he was educated at St Paul’s School, London (where he was in the same class as Oliver Sacks and Jonathan Miller), and, after national service at the Joint Services School for Linguists (where contemporaries included Alan Bennett and Michael Frayn), the Queen’s College, Oxford, where he read Zoology, and won the Christopher Welch Scholarship in 1957. He did research on molluscs in Oxford, Toronto, Southampton, and Liverpool, but left academia without taking a doctorate. Instead, he became a successful antiquarian bookseller with wide-ranging interests, but a particular speciality was nineteenth-century scientific books; he helped recreate Darwin’s library at Down House. He wrote the ‘Bibliophile’ column for The Guardian, and the ‘Remainders’ column for the Times Literary Supplement, and was a frequent competitor in Radio 4’s Round Britain Quiz. He was survived by his wife Olga and by two sons from his first marriage.

 

Philip Howard

2 November 1933 – 5 October 2014

Philip Nicholas Charles Howard, journalist, died on 5 October 2014, aged 80. The son of Peter Morris, an England rugby player and adherent first of Oswald Mosley’s New Party and then Moral Re-Armament, and his wife Doris Metaxa, a Wimbledon doubles champion, he was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Oxford, where he read Literae Humaniores. After national service in the Black Watch he joined the staff of the Glasgow Herald, moving in 1964 to The Times, where he remained for the next half century, becoming literary editor from 1978 to 1992 and thereafter still writing as a columnist beyond his formal retirement in 1999. He also wrote or edited some twenty books, including a history of the Black Watch, several books about the English language (he was, perhaps surprisingly, by no means a stickler for old rules), and a number of compilations from The Times. An active member of the Horatian Society, the Society of Bookmen, and the Literary Society, he was president of the Classical Association in 2002. He was survived by his wife Myrtle and their three children.

 

Sir Maurice Hodgson

21 October 1919 – 1 October 2014

Sir Maurice Arthur Eric Hodgson, industrialist, died on 1 October 2014, aged 94. Born in Bradford, the son of schoolteachers, he was educated at Bradford Grammar School (where contemporaries included Denis Healey and Alan Bullock) and Merton College, Oxford, where he read Chemistry, graduating in 1942. Directed to work for ICI, he remained with the company until 1982, latterly as deputy chairman from 1972 and chairman from 1978; in the latter position he took a calculated gamble by cutting the company’s dividends in 1981, a move which caused some concern in political and financial circles but helped place the company on a firmer footing. He went on to chair British Home Stores (1982-7) and Dunlop (1984). He was knighted in 1979. He was survived by his two children, his wife Norma having predeceased him.

 

Charles de Lisle

18 August 1960 – 1 October 2014

Charles Andrew Everard March Phillipps de Lisle, journalist, died on 1 October 2014, aged 54. Born in London, the son of a cavalry officer (and grandson of Osbert Peake, first Viscount Ingleby, politician), he was educated at Eton and Worcester College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. After graduation, and through an introduction from his tutor Harry Pitt to another former pupil, Rupert Murdoch, he joined the staff of the Adelaide News, then the Sydney Daily Telegraph. In 1987 he returned to England and joined the staff of the Daily Telegraph, working for several years as deputy editor of the Peterborough column and later as House of Lords correspondent. He also wrote much cricket journalism, including for The Cricketer. He later worked more fitfully, but wrote occasionally for the Evening Standard and Daily Mail. He was survived by his wife Rachel and their daughter.

 

Anna Morpurgo Davies

21 June 1937 – 27 September 2014

Anna Elbina Davies, née Morpurgo, known as Anna Morpurgo Davies, FBA, Hon DBE, Professor of Comparative Philology at Oxford and fellow of Somerville College, died on 27 September 2014, aged 77. Born in Milan to a Jewish family, she was forced with her family into hiding in Rome during the German occupation. After the war she read classics at Rome University; she held posts in Rome and at Harvard before marrying the ancient historian John K. Davies and moving to Oxford. She became a University lecturer in 1964 (and a fellow of St Hilda’s College in 1966), then Professor of Comparative Philology (and fellow of Somerville College) in 1971, retiring as the Diebold Professor of Comparative Philology in 2004. She published widely on ancient Greek and Anatolian philology, and on the history of linguistics. She was elected an FBA in 1985 and (having retained her Italian citizenship) was made an honorary DBE in 2000. Her marriage was dissolved in 1978 and she had no children.

 

Sir Edward Eveleigh

8 October 1917 – 24 September 2014

The Rt Hon Sir Edward Walter Eveleigh PC, barrister and judge, died on 24 September 2014, aged 96. He was educated at Peter Symonds College, Winchester, and Brasenose College, Oxford, where he read jurisprudence, graduating in 1939. Having joined the Supplementary Reserve in 1936, he was called up on the outbreak of the Second World War and served throughout with the Royal Artillery. On demobilisation he was called to the bar by Lincoln’s Inn in 1945, specialising in criminal law; he took silk in 1961 and was appointed a High Court judge in 1968 (being awarded the customary knighthood the same year), chairman of the Oxford Quarter Sessions from 1968 to 1971, and presiding judge on the South-Eastern circuit from 1971 to 1976. He was a Lord Justice of Appeal from 1977 to 1985. Among the notable cases he presided over were Hugh Trevor-Roper’s successful libel action against Lord Chalfont in 1973 and the trial of John Stonehouse in 1976 for fraud. He was survived by his third wife, Nell, and by two sons of his second marriage.

 

Derek Roe

31 August 1937 – 24 September 2014

The archaeologist Derek Arthur Roe died on 24 September 2014, aged 77. Born in St Leonards-on-Sea, Sussex, he was educated at St Edward’s School, Oxford, and, after national service in the Royal Sussex Regiment and the Intelligence Corps, Peterhouse, Cambridge, graduating in 1961 and going on to write a PhD thesis on British Palaeolithic handaxes. He became a lecturer at Oxford University in 1965 and remained until 2003, from 1997 as Professor of Palaeolithic Archaeology. He was also a founding fellow of St Cross College, and honorary director of the Donald Baden-Powell Quaternary Research Centre. He was widely respected for his work on early prehistory in Africa as well as Britain, and worked closely with Mary Leakey on her memoirs and in publishing the findings of her Olduvai Gorge excavations (carried out some forty years previously). He also wrote a popular introduction to Prehistory (1970). He was survived by his wife Sarah and the two children of his first marriage.

 

Robert Long

30 January 1937 – 19 September 2014

Brigadier Robert George (Bob) Long CBE, MC, army officer, died on 19 September 2014, aged 77. Born in Calcutta, the son of an Indian Army officer, he was brought up near Fareham, Hampshire, and educated at Sherborne School and, after national service in the Royal Hampshire Regiment, Brasenose College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics. After graduating in 1960 he worked briefly for an oil company before re-joining his old regiment with a regular commission. He served in British Guiana, Borneo during the Indonesian ‘confrontation’, Cyprus, West Germany, and (in command of the Royal Hampshires) Northern Ireland, before a series of staff and command posts, culminating in service as chief of staff at the Directorate of Infantry immediately before retirement. He was an enthusiast for old motor cars, frequently driving his Morgan to rallies in France and Spain. He was survived by his wife Allison and their three children.

 

Colin Shaw

2 November 1928 – 18 September 2014

Colin Don Shaw CBE, broadcasting executive, died on 18 September 2014, aged 85. Born in Liverpool, the son of a bank manager, he was educated at Liverpool College and St Peter’s Hall, Oxford, where he read English. After graduating in 1952 he joined BBC Radio as a drama producer in Leeds; he meanwhile qualified as a barrister, and joined the BBC Secretariat in 1960, becoming chief secretary in 1972. From 1977 to 1983 he was director of television at the newly-formed IBA, and was subsequently director of the Programme Planning Secretariat at the Independent Television Companies’ Association (1983-7) and director of the Broadcasting Standards Council (1988-96). He wrote several radio plays and a stage play for children. He was survived by his wife Elizabeth and their three children.

 

John Moat

11 September 1936 – 16 September 2014

The poet and author John Moat died on 16 September 2014, aged 78. Born in India, he was educated at Radley College and Exeter College, Oxford, where he read English, graduating in 1960. After a difficult start and a number of years teaching in the UK and the US, he settled with his wife Antoinette in Devon, publishing two novels and several volumes of poetry; he was also the co-founder with John Fairfax in 1968 of the Arvon Foundation, and later of several other initiatives aimed at promoting the arts and creative thinking, and was a regular contributor to the magazine Resurgence. He was survived by Antoinette and their two children.

 

Nigel Walker

6 August 1917 – 13 September 2014

Nigel David Walker CBE, penologist and criminologist, died on 13 September 2014, aged 97. Born in Tianjin, China, the son of the British vice-consul, he was educated at Edinburgh Academy and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read Literae Humaniores, graduating in 1939. His career in the Scottish Office was interrupted by wartime service with the Cameron Highlanders and Lovat Scouts; he was invalided out of the army after being wounded in Italy, and returned to the Scottish Office, where he remained until 1961, serving latterly in the Home Department. A Gwilym Gibbon fellowship at Nuffield College, Oxford, in 1958-9 inspired him to change careers, and from 1961 to 1973 he was university reader in criminology and an official fellow of Nuffield College. He moved to Cambridge in 1973 as Wolfson Professor of Criminology and a fellow of King’s College. He authored a series of highly influential books, including Crime and Insanity in Britain (1968) and Why Punish? (1991). He was survived by a daughter, his wife Sheila having predeceased him.

 

John Bone

28 August 1930 – 5 July 2014

The Rt Rev John Bone, Bishop of Reading from 1989 to 1996, died on 5 July 2014, aged 83. He was educated at Monkton Combe School, Bath, St Peter’s Hall, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1954, Ely Theological College, being ordained in 1956, and Whitelands College of Education, where he took a graduate certificate in education. He was assistant curate at St Gabriel’s, Warwick Square, and St Mary’s, Henley-on-Thames, then vicar of Datchet (1963-76), rector of Slough (1976-8), and archdeacon of Buckingham (1978-89) before becoming Bishop of Reading. He was widely admired for his humility and pastoral skills. In retirement from 1996 he was an honorary assistant bishop in the diocese of Oxford. He was survived by his wife Ruth and their five children.

 

David Lomax

18 May 1938 – 5 September 2014

David Richard Lomax, journalist and broadcaster, died on 5 September 2014, aged 76. Born in Normanby, Yorkshire, he was educated at Kingswood School, Bath, and, after national service in the RAF, Brasenose College, Oxford, where he read Modern History, graduating in 1961. He then joined the BBC as a trainee presenter, subsequently reporting for current affairs programmes including 24 Hours, Nationwide and Panorama. He was particularly admired for his fearless interviews of the likes of Idi Amin and Robert Mugabe, and his reporting from hotspots such as the Lebanon. In 1986 he was made redundant as part of a streamlining of the BBC, spending his redundancy money on a yacht, but he was rarely short of freelance work, latterly specialising in interviews with leading figures from industry and finance (at one point provoking Steve Jobs into walking out). He also made full use of his yacht, and in 1992 he and his wife Judy were among the crew who sailed a replica Viking ship from Norway to New York. He was survived by her, their five children, and two foster daughters.

 

The Earl of Lisburne

1 September 1918 – 2 September 2014

John David Malet Vaughan, eighth Earl of Lisburne, businessman and landowner, died on 2 September 2014, aged 96. Born in Watford, he grew up at Trawsgoed, the family seat near Aberystwyth, and was educated at Eton and (as Viscount Vaughan) at Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence, graduating in 1939. During the Second World War he served with the Welsh Guards, seeing action in north-west Europe after D-Day. On demobilisation he was called to the bar by the Inner Temple and practised as a barrister, but during the Korean War he served briefly with Naval Intelligence, and thereafter pursued a career largely in business; he was deputy chairman of Westward Television, and a director of British Home Stores. Losses in the Lloyd’s insurance market in the early 1990s forced him to sell the majority of the family estate. As an Irish peer he was not allowed to sit in the House of Lords. He was survived by his wife Shelagh and their three sons.

 

William Merton

25 November 1917 – 2 September 2014

William Ralph Merton, financier, died on 2 September 2014, aged 96. Born in London, the son of Sir Thomas Merton, the spectroscopist (and sometime Professor of Spectroscopy at Oxford), he was educated at Eton and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Physics, graduating in 1938. During the Second World War he worked as an occupational researcher for the Admiralty and Coastal Command, and then was scientific adviser to Lord Cherwell. After the war he continued his scientific work as director of the Fulmer Research Institute at Stoke Poges before joining the banking house of Erlangers as a protégé of its chairman, Leo D’Erlanger. Following its merger with Philip Hill Higginson in 1960 he moved to Robert Fleming & Co, of which he became chairman from 1974 to 1980. He was survived by his wife Judy, and by the three sons of his first marriage (his first wife, Anthea, having predeceased him).


 

Derek Robinson

9 February 1932 – 1 September 2014

The economist Derek Robinson CBE died on 1 September 2014, aged 82. Born in Barnsley, he was educated at Barnsley Holgate Grammar School, leaving at the age of sixteen to join the civil service. Active in the civil servants’ trade union, he studied at Ruskin College, Oxford, then at Lincoln College, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1959. After a brief spell at Sheffield University he returned to Oxford as a senior research officer with the Oxford Institute of Economics and Statistics; he became a fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford, in 1969, and remained there, as an emeritus fellow, after his retirement in 1999. He published several books on incomes and pay policies and was an adviser to Harold Wilson, Jim Callaghan and Barbara Castle in the 1964-70 Labour government. He also held several public service posts, but was frozen out under Margaret Thatcher and was deeply critical of ‘new’ Labour under Tony Blair. He was survived by his wife, Jean Lynch, and by their two children.

 

Michael Kustow

18 November 1939 – 29 August 2014

The producer and writer Michael David Kustow died on 29 August 2014, aged 74. Born in Golders Green, London, the son of Jewish parents from eastern Europe, he was educated at Haberdasher’s Aske’s School in Hampstead and Wadham College, Oxford, where he read English, graduating in 1960. He spent some time working on a kibbutz in Israel before serving an apprenticeship with Roger Planchon’s Théâtre de la Cité in Lyon. Returning to Britain, he worked with a number of distinguished directors including Arnold Wesker at Centre 42 and Peter Hall and Peter Brook at the RSC and later the National Theatre. From 1967 to 1970 he was a highly successful director of the Institute of Contemporary Arts, overseeing its move to a new home on the Mall. He was commissioning editor for arts programmes for Channel 4 from 1981 to 1990 before setting up his own production company in 1990. He wrote several books, including a mid-career ‘autobiographical fiction’, Tank (1975). Both his marriages ended in divorce.

 

Sandy Wilson

19 May 1924 – 27 August 2014

The composer and lyricist Sandy Wilson died on 27 August 2014, aged 90. Born in Sale, Cheshire, he was educated at Elstree Preparatory School, Harrow School, and, after war service as a clerk in the Ordnance Corps, Oriel College, Oxford, where he read the war-shortened course in English, graduating in 1948. As an undergraduate he spent most of his time writing and appearing in revues, and on graduation embarked on a career as a freelance lyricist and composer. He was often compared to Noël Coward, who was enthusiastic about his compositions. He scored a worldwide hit with The Boy Friend (1953), which ran for five years in the West End and enjoyed international success, though Wilson disliked several productions and especially the 1971 film version by Ken Russell. His subsequent work, including a follow-on to The Boy Friend, Divorce Me, Darling! (1964), was by no means as successful. He never married.

 

Simon Featherstone

24 July 1958 – 26 August 2014

The diplomat Simon Mark Featherstone CMG died on 26 August 2014, aged 56. The son of a theologian, he was educated at Whitgift School, Croydon, and Lincoln College, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence. He joined the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in 1980 and, after studying Chinese at SOAS, spent a large portion of his career either in China or dealing with Chinese issues in London; he was also known as an expert on EU environmental law. He was UK Ambassador to Switzerland from 2004 to 2008, the Prime Minister’s international representative on energy issues in 2008-9, British director of the Shanghai Expo 2010 in 2009-10, and finally high commissioner to Malaysia from 2010 until his retirement through ill-health in May 2014. He was survived by his wife Gail (née Salisbury), whom he met at Oxford, and by their three children.

 

Caroline Kellett

12 January 1960 – 26 August 2014

Caroline Kellett, fashion journalist, died on 26 August 2014, aged 54. Born in Buckinghamshire, the daughter of a property developer, she was educated at Wycombe Abbey School and Wadham College, Oxford, where she read Modern History, and was already making a name for herself with her fashion statements. After graduating she spent five years as fashion features editor at Vogue; she was later at various points a contributing editor to W magazine, fashion editor of the Evening Standard and of Tatler, and society editor of OK! magazine. She was also a talented botanical artist. She was survived by her husband Jean-Marc Fraysse, a financier.

 

Alexander Currie

2 May 1926 – 24 August 2014

Alexander Monteith Currie, university administrator, died on 24 August 2014, aged 88. The son of an industrial chemist, he was educated at Stevenston High School in Ayrshire and Porthmadog Grammar School before wartime service with the Royal Navy, mainly in the Atlantic and Mediterranean. After demobilisation he read English at Bangor, then took a BLitt through St Catherine’s Society, Oxford, on the poet John Davidson. Entering university administration, he worked at Manchester and Liverpool universities before occupying the top posts at Sheffield and then Edinburgh universities. He was survived by his wife Pamela and their two sons.

 

Sir Philip Dowson

16 August 1924 – 22 August 2014

Sir Philip Manning Dowson CBE, architect, died on 22 August 2014, aged 90. Born in Johannesburg, the son of an engineer, he moved with his family to Norfolk while still young and was educated at Gresham’s School. He spent a year at University College, Oxford, reading Mathematics before enlisting in the Royal Navy, seeing action in the Atlantic and Pacific, providing covering fire on D-Day, and supporting the invasion of Okinawa. On demobilisation he studied History at Clare College, Cambridge, followed by training at the Architectural Association School in London, before joining the office of Ove Arup; he was a senior partner of Ove Arup Partnership from 1969 until his retirement in 1990. Among his many acclaimed buildings were several extensions to Oxbridge colleges (including the Thomas White building at St John’s College, Oxford, and the Forbes Mellon library at Clare College, Cambridge), as well as the Snape Maltings in Suffolk. He was knighted in 1980 and served as president of the Royal Academy of Arts from 1993 to 1999 (masterminding the purchase of new premises in Burlington Gardens). He was survived by his wife Sarah and their three children.

 

J. Bryce McLeod

23 December 1929 – 20 August 2014

John Bryce McLeod FRS, mathematician, died on 20 August 2014, aged 84. He was educated at Aberdeen Grammar School and the University of Aberdeen, taking his MA in 1950, then read Mathematics at Christ Church, Oxford, graduating in 1952. After national service as an education officer in the RAF he was Harmsworth Senior Scholar at Merton College, and a junior lecturer in mathematics, while completing his DPhil, awarded in 1958. He taught briefly at the University of Edinburgh before returning to Oxford as a fellow of Wadham College from 1960 to 1991. In 1988 he moved to the United States, as Professor of Mathematics at the University of Pittsburgh, holding that post until 2007, but keeping a house in Abingdon. From 2007 he was a visiting professor at Oxford. The author of over 150 research papers, he was especially known for his contributions to applied analysis (the use of mathematical equations to solve problems in mechanics, physics and biology). He was survived by his wife Eunice and their four children.

 

Chris Brooks

7 December 1948 – 19 August 2014

The legal historian Christopher (Chris) Brooks died on 19 August 2014, aged 65. Born in Salisbury, Maryland, USA, the son of a car salesman, he took his first degree at Princeton and served in the US army before coming to Linacre College, Oxford as a graduate student; he was awarded a DPhil in 1979 for a thesis on ‘Some aspects of attorneys in England during the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries’. After a short spell teaching at Brasenose he joined the staff of Durham University, where he remained for the rest of his career, establishing himself as an expert on the early modern legal system and the emerging profession of solicitors. He had been looking forward to retirement in Florida at the time of his death. He was survived by his wife Sharyn, whom he had married when both were teenagers, and their two children.

 

David Russell

6 November 1938 – 17 August 2014

The Rt Rev David Patrick Hamilton Russell, Bishop of Grahamstown, South Africa, from 1987 to 2004, died on 17 August 2014, aged 75. Born in Cape Town, the son of Hamilton Russell, a United Party and subsequently Progressive Party MP in the South African parliament, he was educated at Diocesan College, Rondebosch, and the University of Cape Town, before taking an MA at Oxford. He trained for the ministry while living with the Community of the Resurrection at Mirfield, Yorkshire, before returning to South Africa, where he ministered first in the rural Eastern Cape, and then King William’s Town. A friend of Steve Biko and of Desmond Tutu, his outspoken opposition to the apartheid government led to him being placed under house arrest between 1977 and 1982; he also spent time in prison for breaking his banning order. As Bishop of Grahamstown his continued his campaigning for social justice. He was survived by his wife Dorothea and their two children.

 

Margaret Wileman

19 July 1908 – 12 August 2014

Margaret Annie Wileman, educationist and founding President of Hughes Hall, Cambridge, died on 12 August 2014, aged 106. She arrived at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, in 1927 as a scholar, graduating in French in 1930. After a Zaharoff travelling scholarship she taught briefly at Abbey School, Reading, before entering the world of teacher training, at Queen’s College, Harley Street, St Katherine’s College, Liverpool, and Bedford College, London, where she was a resident warden. In 1953 she became the seventh principal of Hughes Hall, Cambridge, an all-female graduate teacher-training college founded in 1885. She oversaw the beginnings of its transformation into a fully-fledged college of the university (though it did not achieve full college status until 2006). Her final year, 1973, saw her title change to President, and also the admission for the first time of male students. She continued to lunch in college on a regular basis until she was well over 100. A devout Roman Catholic, she helped with the education of nuns. She never married.

 

Jack Dominian

25 August 1929 – 11 August 2014

Jacobus (Jack) Dominian MBE, psychiatrist, died on 11 August 2014, aged 84. Born in Greece to an Armenian Catholic father and a Greek Orthodox mother, he attended the Lycée Leonin in Athens before the family fled to India following the Nazi invasion, and he completed his secondary schooling at St Mary’s High School, Bombay. After the war the family moved to England, and he studied medicine at Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge, then Exeter College, Oxford. After postgraduate work at the Radcliffe Infirmary he joined the staff of the Maudsley Hospital, where he trained as a psychiatrist. From 1965 to 1988 he was senior consultant psychiatrist at the Central Middlesex Hospital. He published many books on love, marriage, divorce and the sexual revolution and, a committed Roman Catholic, was especially influential in the re-evaluation of Catholic sexual teaching. He was survived by his four daughters, his wife Edith having predeceased him.

 

Sir Leonard Figg

17 August 1923 – 11 August 2014

Sir Leonard Clifford William Figg KCMG, diplomat, died on 11 August 2014, aged 90. The son of Sir Clifford Figg, a tea and rubber planter, he was educated at Charterhouse and Trinity College, Oxford, but his studies were interrupted by war service with the RAF, mainly spent in transport aircraft in Canada, India and Burma. On demobilisation he joined the Diplomatic Service. His postings included Addis Ababa, Amman, Chicago, and Milan, and he served as Ambassador to Ireland in 1980-3. He was knighted KCMG in 1981. In retirement near Great Missenden he was, amongst other things, president of the Aylesbury Divisional Conservative Association, and of the Chiltern Society. He was survived by his three sons, his wife Jane having predeceased him.

 

Dame Kathleen Ollerenshaw

1 October 1912 – 10 August 2014

Dame Kathleen Mary Ollerenshaw (née Timpson) DBE died on 10 August 2014, aged 101. The daughter of Charles Timpson, from the Timpson Shoes family, she was left almost deaf by a viral infection from the age of eight until she acquired her first effective hearing aid at 37. Despite this, she did well at St Leonard’s School, St Andrews, and, after a year at Manchester University, at Somerville College, Oxford, where she read Mathematics, graduating in 1934; she was also a hockey blue. She worked briefly at the Shirley Institute in Didsbury, undertaking research for the cotton industry, but soon after her marriage to Robert Ollerenshaw in 1939 returned to Oxford to study for a DPhil, awarded for five original papers in 1945. Her interest in education led her into local politics when the family moved back to Manchester, and she served as a Conservative councillor for twenty-five years, including three as leader of the Conservative opposition. She was also involved in a very wide range of public service roles, particularly in bodies relating to education and to Manchester. She was made a DBE in 1971. She was predeceased by her husband and both their children.

 

Michael Parkin

1 December 1931 – 4 August 2014

The art dealer and entrepreneur Michael Robert Parkin died on 4 August 2014, aged 82. Born in London, the son of a haulage contractor, he was educated at Mill Hill School and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence. After national service with the Royal Irish Fusiliers and a spell with the market research company AC Nielsen, he joined Rediffusion, then set up Channel Television in Jersey, and became manager of Radio Caroline. In 1972 he established his own gallery in Belgravia, and for the next twenty-seven years put on a series of often groundbreaking exhibitions, particularly of nineteenth- and twentieth-century British art. He continued dealing in paintings after closing his gallery in 1999. He was survived by his wife Diana, their daughter, and the two daughters of his first marriage.

 

Lettice Curtis

1 February 1915 – 21 July 2014

(Eleanor) Lettice Curtis, pilot, died on 21 July 2014, aged 99. Brought up in Devon, she was educated at Benenden School, Kent, and St Hilda’s College, Oxford, where she read Mathematics and was a triple blue in tennis, fencing and lacrosse. After graduating she took flying lessons and was conducting aerial surveys for the Ordnance Survey when the Second World War broke out. In 1940 she was one of the first recruits to the Air Transport Auxiliary, and over the next five years delivered more than 1,400 planes to bases around Britain, surviving several crash landings and becoming the first woman to fly a four-engined bomber. After the war she was thwarted in her ambition to become a commercial airline pilot, but worked in aviation-related jobs in the public and private sectors and continued flying into her eighties. She never married.

 

Nigel Ryan

12 December 1930 – 17 July 2014

(Christopher) Nigel John Ryan, broadcasting executive, died on 17 July 2014, aged 83. The son of an officer in the Royal Artillery, he was educated at Ampleforth College and, after national service in the Ulster Rifles, the Queen’s College, Oxford, where he read Spanish and French, graduating in 1952. He joined Reuters in 1954, working as a foreign correspondent in Paris, Rome and the Congo. He moved to ITN as a correspondent in 1961 and became editor in 1968 and editor and chief executive from 1971 to 1977. He was subsequently vice-president of NBC News in New York and director of programmes for Thames Television, and later a director and chairman of TV-am News. He was the author of several books including A Hitch or Two in Afghanistan (1983), an account of an undercover visit to Soviet-occupied Afghanistan with his colleague Sandy Gall. He was survived by his wife Hélène.

 

Sir Alexander Stirling

20 October 1927 – 16 July 2014

The diplomat Sir Alexander John Dickson Stirling KBE, CMG, died on 16 July 2014, aged 86. Born in Rawalpindi, India, the son of an army doctor, he was educated at Edinburgh Academy and, after national service with the RAF in Egypt, Lincoln College, Oxford, graduating with a degree in French and Spanish in 1951. Joining the Foreign Office the same year, he was sent to learn Arabic at the Middle East Centre for Arabic Studies in the Lebanon. His subsequent career was spent mainly in the Middle East and North Africa; he was the last British Political Agent and first Ambassador to Bahrain, and subsequently served as Ambassador to Iraq (1977-80), where he survived a siege of the embassy, Tunisia (1981-4), then the home of the PLO, and the Sudan (1984-6), at the time of the famine in neighbouring Ethiopia. In retirement he was especially active within SOS Sahel International UK, serving as its chairman from 1993 to 1997. He was survived by his wife Alison and their four children.

 

Jean Wilks

14 April 1917 – 15 July 2014

Jean Ruth Fraser Wilks CBE, headmistress, died on 15 July 2014, aged 97. Born in Wanstead, Essex, the daughter of a surveyor, she was educated at North London Collegiate School and Somerville College, Oxford, where she read English, graduating in 1939. During the Second World War she taught at Truro High School and James Allen’s Girls’ School, Dulwich, remaining at the latter until 1951. She was then headmistress of Hertfordshire and Essex High School, Bishop’s Stortford (1951-64) and King Edward VI High School for Girls, Birmingham (1965-77). She was president of the Association of Head Mistresses in 1972-4 and served on numerous other educational bodies; she was especially closely associated with Birmingham University, whose council she chaired from 1985 to 1989. She lived latterly in Oxford with her friend Maggie Davidson. She never married.

 

Anthony Hobson

5 September 1921 – 12 July 2014

Anthony Robert Alwyn Hobson FBA, book historian, died on 12 July 2014, aged 92. Born in Rhyl, the son of G. D. Hobson, chairman of Sotheby’s, he was educated at Eton, where he was an Oppidan Scholar, and New College, Oxford, where he read Modern Languages for four terms before being called up. He spent the remainder of the Second World War with the Scots Guards, and was mentioned in despatches during the Italian campaign. After demobilisation he joined Sotheby’s book department, soon becoming its head and a partner in the firm, resigning in 1978 to pursue full-time an already formidable career as a book scholar. Among his own books were Great Libraries (1975), Apollo and Pegasus (1975), on previously unattributed Roman bindings, and Humanists and Bookbinders (1989). He was elected FBA in 1992. He was survived by his three children, his wife Tanya having predeceased him.

 

Anthony Smith

30 March 1926 – 7 July 2014

The writer, broadcaster and adventurer Anthony John Francis Smith died on 7 July 2014, aged 88. Born in Taplow, the son of the estate manager at Cliveden, he was educated at Blundell’s School and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Zoology. His Oxford studies were interrupted by service as a pilot in the RAF Volunteer Reserve. On demobilisation he returned to Oxford, graduating in 1951. His first book, Blind White Fish in Persia (1953), was based on a student expedition. He worked for the Manchester Guardian and the Daily Telegraph until 1963, when he became a freelance journalist, broadcaster and author. Among his many expeditions were a three-month balloon journey across Africa in 1962, and in 2011 a 66-day crossing of the Atlantic in a small raft, with three companions. On television he presented a large number of scientific and geographical programmes, including Tomorrow’s World (1966-7) and Wilderness (1973-4), and from 1977 to 1989 he presented the humorous Sideways Looks on radio. He was survived by five children, his marriages having both ended in divorce.

 

Alan Stanbrook

27 May 1938 – 4 July 2014

The journalist and film critic Alan Geoffrey Stanbrook died on 4 July 2014, aged 76. Born in Worthing, the son of an accountant, he was educated at Worthing High School and, after national service with the army, Jesus College, Oxford, where he read French and Italian, graduating in 1962. His earliest jobs were in financial journalism, but in the mid-1980s The Economist, for which he was then working, asked him to start an arts section, and from 1989 to 2001 he was film critic for the Sunday Telegraph, continuing to write reviews (and increasingly also obituaries) for the paper after his official retirement in 2001. He was a noted authority on the French New Wave, and on modern Japanese cinema. He was survived by his wife Marva and their son.

 

Sally Chilver

3 August 1914 – 3 July 2014

Elizabeth Millicent (Sally) Chilver (née Graves), anthropologist and Principal of Lady Margaret Hall from 1971 to 1979, died on 3 July 2014, aged 99. She was educated at Benenden School, Kent, and Somerville College, Oxford, where she read Modern History. On graduating in 1935, she worked as a journalist and married Richard Chilver in 1937. During the Second World War she worked as a civil servant in the Cabinet Office, and after two postwar years as a journalist with the Daily News she returned to the civil service, working in the Colonial Office until 1957, when she left to become director of Oxford’s Institute of Commonwealth Studies. From 1964 to 1971 she was Principal of Bedford College, University of London. As Principal of Lady Margaret Hall she oversaw the decision to admit men. In retirement from 1979 she continued her anthropological studies, focused mainly on east Africa and the Cameroons. Her husband predeceased her.

 

Tony Bray

13 April 1926 – 2 July 2014

Anthony John (Tony) Bray, accountant, died on 2 July 2014, aged 88. Born in Brentford, Middlesex, the son of a businessman, he was educated at Brighton College and worked as a solicitor’s clerk before being called up for war service. In 1944-5 he was sent to Oxford for training, where he met the young Margaret Roberts (later Margaret Thatcher), whose first boyfriend he became. The relationship fizzled out when he was sent to Germany with the 5th Royal Inniskilling Dragoon Guards, and failed to revive when he returned to Oxford to study Jurisprudence at Brasenose College. He graduated in 1950, qualified as an accountant, and worked in finance, including as an adviser in the construction industry. He was survived by his four daughters, his wife Valerie having predeceased him.

 

Anthony Curtis

12 March 1926 – 29 June 2014

The author, editor and critic Anthony Curtis died on 29 June 2014, aged 88. Brought up in London, he was educated at Midhurst Grammar School and Merton College, Oxford, where he initially read Modern History but, after war and postwar service in the RAF, switched to English, winning the Chancellor’s English Essay Prize in 1949 and graduating in 1950. He combined a career in journalism – he was successively deputy editor of the Times Literary Supplement, literary editor of the Sunday Telegraph, and arts and literary editor of the Financial Times – with his own career as an author. He was perhaps best known for his work on Somerset Maugham and Virginia Woolf, but his books ranged widely over the literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He also made regular appearances on radio, including on Critics’ Forum, and was an active member of the Society of Authors and the Royal Literary Fund, among other organisations. He and his wife Sarah had three sons.

 

Jeffry Wickham

5 August 1933 – 17 June 2014

The actor Jeffry Wickham died on 17 June 2014, aged 80. Born in Somerset, he was educated at Eton College and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Russian and was president of OUDS, graduating in 1957. After training at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art, he began his career in repertory, and thereafter was increasingly in demand in supporting parts on stage, screen, and television, frequently playing ‘establishment’ figures or Russian apparatchiks. Several of his own translations from Russian were staged. A moderate within the actors’ union Equity, he served as its president in 1992-4. With his wife, the actress Clair Stewart, he had three children.

 

Gemmell Alexander

19 August 1918 – 10 June 2014

(William) Gemmell Alexander, colonial official and promoter of co-operatives, died on 10 June 2014, aged 95. Born In Cheshire, the son of a solicitor, he was educated at Sedbergh School and Brasenose College, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence. During the Second World War he served with the British Expeditionary Force to France, hiding for two months in a French attic before escaping the German occupying forces; later he served with the military police attached to the Eighth Army in North Africa and Italy. Post-war, he joined the Colonial Service, serving in the Gilbert and Ellice Islands, Mauritius, and Cyprus until 1960, being particularly involved in promoting economic development through setting up co-operatives. Thereafter he worked for the Co-operative Wholesale Society, the International Co-operative Alliance, and the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents, before retiring in 1978. He was survived by four children, his wife Rona having predeceased him.

 

Peter Marsh

15 September 1946 – 9 June 2014

Peter Marsh, social psychologist, died on 9 June 2014, aged 67. Born in Leeds, the son of an itinerant road-builder, he took a diploma in social studies at Ruskin College, Oxford, followed by a degree in Psychology at University College, Oxford, followed by a DPhil in 1981 for a thesis on ‘rule-governed expressions of aggression among football fans and youth’. From 1977 to 1979 he was co-director of the Contemporary Violence Research Centre in Oxford; from 1979 to 1989 he lectured at Oxford Polytechnic; and in the latter year he left to set up MCM Research, based in Oxford, to undertake funded research. In 1997 he also co-founded the Social Issues Research Centre in Oxford. He was well known for his work on hooliganism, and his research on pub closing-time violence was cited in the white paper Time for Reform (2000), which led to major changes in the UK licensing laws. He also wrote several books on human communication. He was survived by his wife Patricia and their two children.

 

Ben Whitaker

15 September 1934 – 8 June 2014

Benjamin John Charles (Ben) Whitaker CBE, Labour politician and human rights campaigner, died on 8 June 2014, aged 79. Born in Nottinghamshire, the son of Major-General Sir John Whitaker, he was educated at Eton and, after national service with the Coldstream Guards, at New College, Oxford, where he read Modern History, graduating in 1957. Called to the bar by the Inner Temple, he practised as a barrister before briefly becoming Labour MP in the former Conservative stronghold of Hampstead, from 1966 to 1970. Thereafter he was executive director of the Minority Rights Group (1971-88) and of the Gulbenkian Foundation (UK) from 1988 to 1999. He was also closely involved in Amnesty International and other human rights organisations, and author of a large number of books, particularly on human rights and policing. He was survived by his wife Janet (who became Baroness Whitaker in 1999) and their three children.

 

Dick Gould

7 August 1922 – 7 June 2014

Richard John (Dick) Gould, headmaster, died on 7 June 2014, aged 92. Born in Simla, the son of a civil servant, he also spent much of his childhood in Afghanistan, where his father worked at the British Legation. He was educated at Winchester and, after war service with the King’s Royal Rifle Corps, Christ Church, Oxford, where he read the war-shortened course in Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1948. He then taught at Wellington College before in the late 1950s becoming headmaster of Stanbridge Earls School in Hampshire, where he built a reputation as a pioneer in the education of children with dyslexia. He was survived by his wife Erica and their three daughters.

 

Roger Mayne

5 May 1929 – 7 June 2014

The photographer Roger Mayne died on 7 June 2014, aged 85. Born In Cambridge, he studied Chemistry at Balliol College, Oxford, graduating in 1951, before becoming a freelance photojournalist. His work ranged widely – he photographed the artistic community at St Ives and the actors at the Royal Court Theatre (where he met his wife, the playwright Ann Jellicoe), and many of his portraits are in the National Portrait Gallery – but he was probably best known for his street scenes, particularly those taken in Southam Street, North Kensington, in the 1950s and 1960s, and later series taken in China and Japan, and for his landscapes of Dorset after he and his family moved to Lyme Regis. He was survived by his wife and their two children.

 

Norman Willis

21 January 1933 – 7 June 2014

Norman David Willis, General Secretary of the Trades Union Congress from 1984 to 1993, died on 7 June 2014, aged 81. Born in Ashford, Middlesex, the son of a labourer, he was educated at Ashford County Grammar School, leaving at 16 to take a job as an office boy at the TGWU headquarters. Following national service he was sponsored by the TGWU to study at Ruskin College, Oxford, after which he enrolled as a student at Oriel College, reading Philosophy, Politics and Economics, and graduating in 1959. He spent a further 15 years working for the TGWU before joining the TUC as assistant general secretary in 1974 and deputy general secretary from 1977. His period as General Secretary was an unhappy one, coinciding as it did with the miners’ strike, the Wapping dispute, and the rapid decline in both membership and power of the trade unions; though genial and admired for his wit, he was widely criticised for being ineffectual. After his retirement he largely confined his activities to those connected with his hobbies of birdwatching and embroidery; in his Who’s Who entry he described himself as ‘Trustee and Black Bin Bag Operative (Grade 2)’ of the Sunbury-on-Thames Millennium Embroidery Gallery. He was survived by his wife Maureen and their two children.

 

Rt Rev John Baker

11 January 1928 - 4 June 2014

The Rt Rev John Austin Baker, Bishop of Salisbury from 1982 to 1993, died on 4 June 2014, aged 86. Born in Birmingham, the son of a company secretary, he was educated at Marlborough College and Oriel College, Oxford, where he took classical moderations but then switched to Theology. He graduated in 1952, and took a BLitt in 1955, meanwhile having been ordained as a priest, and staying on at Cuddesdon Theological College as a lecturer until 1957. After a brief spell at King's College, London, he returned to Oxford, where he was chaplain and lecturer in Divinity at Corpus Christi from 1959 to 1973, teaching also for Brasenose and Lincoln colleges, and for four years Exeter College. He was a noted Old Testament scholar. In 1973 he was made a canon of Westminster, and in 1978 rector of St Margaret's and Speaker's chaplain. As Bishop of Salisbury he attracted controversy, particularly for his chairmanship of the committee which produced The Church and the Bomb (1982), and for his views on animal welfare and farming. Later he earned a rebuke from the Archbishop of Canterbury, George Carey, for declaring that gay clergy should be allowed the same freedoms as laity. In retirement from 1994 he was an honorary assistant bishop in the diocese of Winchester. He was survived by his wife Jill.

 

Charles Swithinbank

17 November 1926 - 27 May 2014

The glaciologist and polar explorer Charles Winthrop Molesworth Swithinbank died on 27 May 2014, aged 87. Born in Burma, the son of a civil servant, he was educated at Bryanston School and, after two years' service in the Royal Navy, Pembroke College, Oxford, where he read Geography. Immediately after graduating in 1949 he joined a two-year Norwegian-British-Swedish expedition to the Antarctic; his work there formed the basis for a DPhil submitted in 1955. Thereafter, except for a few years at the University of Michigan, he was based in Cambridge, with the Scott Polar Research Institute until 1976, then with the British Antarctic Survey until 1986, but with very frequent expeditions to the Antarctic and Arctic. He was particularly noted for his contributions to glaciology, including measurements of ice thickness and studies of sea ice variations. He and his wife Mary had two children.

 

G.T. Young

7 December 1915 – 24 May 2014

Geoffrey Tyndale Young OBE, chemist, and fellow of Jesus College, Oxford, died on 24 May 2014, aged 98. Educated at King Edward VII School, King’s Lynn, and the University of Birmingham, he did his PhD at Bristol University on the structure of starch. He then joined the staff at Bristol, moving to Jesus College in 1947, where he spent the remainder of his career, serving as vice-principal and acting principal, and being made an emeritus fellow on retirement in 1982. His published work was mainly on amino acids and peptides. He had three daughters with his wife Janet (later Baroness Young, leader of the House of Lords from 1981 to 1983); she died in 2002.

 

Prince Rupert Loewenstein

24 August 1933 - 20 May 2014

Prince Rupert Ludwig Ferdinand zu Loewenstein, banker and financial adviser, died on 20 May 2014, aged 80. Born in Palma de Mallorca, he was brought up in Spain then England, attending St Christopher School in Letchworth Garden City before reading Modern History at Magdalen College, Oxford. After graduating in 1954 he joined the stockbrokers Bache & Co, then bought out the private merchant bank Leopold Joseph & Sons, attracting the custom of the rich and famous. From 1970 to 2007 he was financial adviser to the Rolling Stones, turning around their then chaotic finances and making both them and him multi-millionaires; he owned houses in Richmond, Los Angeles and Mustique, travelling between them by private plane. His memoirs, A Prince Among Stones, were published in 2013. He was survived by his wife Josephine and their three children.

 

Radu Florescu

23 October 1925 - 18 May 2014

Radu Florescu, historian, died on 18 May 2014, aged 88. Born in Bucharest, the son of a diplomat, he joined his father (who was acting ambassador to London) in England shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War; the family went into exile when Romania sided with the Axis powers. He read Philosophy, Politics and Economics at Christ Church, graduating in 1947. After further studies in Texas and Indiana he joined the teaching staff of Boston College, where he eventually became a professor of history and head of a centre for research on Eastern European countries. He was particularly noted for his work on the fifteenth-century Transylvanian prince, Vlad Tepes ('Vlad the Impaler'), making the most of possible links with the story of Dracula. He later achieved notoriety for his claim that Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein was based on stories about a German alchemist, Konrad Dippel. He was survived by his wife Nicole and four children.

 

David Abbott

11 October 1938 - 17 May 2014

The advertising executive David John Abbott died on 17 May 2014, aged 75. Born in Hammersmith, the son of a shopkeeper, he was educated in Pinner and at Merton College, Oxford, here he read Modern History but left without completing his degree in order to help his ailing father. After selling the business he trained as a copy-editor, working for Mather & Crowther and Doyle Dane Bernbach before co-founding French Gold Abbott in 1971 and then the hugely successful Abbott Mead Vickers. Highly rated by his peers, among his memorable campaigns were J. R. Hartley tracking down his out-of-print book via Yellow Pages, and Bob Hoskins promoting BT with the slogan, 'It's good to talk'. He was survived by three sons and a daughter.

 

Kaye Whiteman

9 March 1936 - 17 May 2014

(Martin) Kaye Whiteman, journalist and editor, died on 17 May 2014, aged 78. Born in Hadley Wood, north London, into a Quaker family, he was educated at the Friends’ School in Saffron Walden, Essex, and then Bootham School in York. After service in the Friends’ Ambulance Unit, he read Modern History at the Queen's College, Oxford, graduating in 1959. In 1963 he joined the staff of West Africa magazine, of which he became editor in 1982, and later editor-in-chief and general manager; the magazine always struggled, and closed in 2005. He was a noted expert in particular on Nigeria, and he was much later the author of the acclaimed Lagos: A Cultural and Literary History (2012). He worked briefly at the Commonwealth Secretariat as director of information, and wrote in particular for the Lagos-based BusinessDay, and for Africa Today. He was survived by his wife Marva and their son.

 

Tim David

3 June 1947 – 12 May 2014

Timothy James (Tim) David, diplomat, died on 12 May 2014, aged 66. He was educated at Stonyhurst College and, after a spell as a volunteer teacher in Southern Rhodesia, New College, Oxford, where he read Modern History, graduating in 1969. He returned to Southern Rhodesia as headmaster of St Peter’s Community School in Salisbury in 1970-1, then worked for the British Council before in 1974 joining the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. His posts were mainly in developing Commonwealth countries, and he served as Ambassador to Fiji and High Commissioner to Nauru, Tuvalu and Kiribati, High Commissioner in Belize, and finally High Commissioner in Zambia from 2002 to 2005. In retirement he was involved in numerous charitable organisations, mainly concerned with development. He was survived by his wife Rosie and their two children.

 

Sir David Rowlands

31 May 1947 – 11 May 2014

Sir David Rowlands KCB, civil servant, died on 11 May 2014, aged 66. The son of a truck driver, he was educated at St Mary’s College, Crosby, and St Edmund Hall, Oxford, here he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics. He entered the civil service in 1974, and rose to be permanent secretary of the Department of Transport from 2003 to 2007. In retirement he was chairman of High Speed Two and of Gatwick Airport Ltd, as well as taking on various other directorships. He was knighted KCB in 2006. He was survived by his wife Louise and their two sons.

 

Sir Andrew Kirkwood

5 June 1944 – 8 May 2014

Sir Andrew Tristram Hammett Kirkwood QC, barrister and judge, died on 8 May 2014, aged 69. The son of a major in the Royal Engineers who was killed in Holland when Kirkwood was six months old, he was educated at Radley College and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence, graduating in 1965. He was called to the bar by the Inner Temple in 1966 and soon established a thriving practice, specialising in family law. He became a recorder in 1987 and a judge of the High Court of Justice, Family Division, with the customary knighthood, from 1993 until his retirement in 2008. He was an adviser to the Cleveland child abuse inquiry set up in 1987, chaired the inquiry into child abuse in homes run by Leicestershire County Council in 1992, and in 2001 heard the ‘internet twins’ adoption case (when he ruled that two babies adopted over the internet by a British couple should be returned to the US). He was survived by his wife Penelope and their three children.

 

Sir Michael Heron

22 October 1934 – 7 May 2014

Sir Michal Gilbert Heron, businessman and chairman of the Post Office from 1993 to 1997, died on 7 May 2014, aged 79. The son of a postman, he was the first student to go from his school, St Joseph’s Roman Catholic Academy in Blackheath, to Oxford; after national service in the Royal Artillery he read Modern History at New College, graduating in 1958. At Unilever he worked his way up from salesman to chairman of Batchelors Foods in 1976, main board director of Unilever in 1986, and finally worldwide director of human resources. He was chosen by Michael Heseltine to run the Post Office with a brief to prepare it for part-privatisation; in the event, to Heron’s disappointment neither the Conservative government nor its Labour successor was willing to go down this route. However, he did make efficiencies, leading to record profits by the time he retired. He was knighted in 1996. He was survived by three children from his marriage to Celia Hunter, and by his partner, Liz Spencer.

 

Michael Brock

9 March 1920 - 30 April 2014

Michael George Brock CBE, historian, died on 30 April 2014, aged 94. Born in Bromley, the son of the civil servant Sir Laurence Brock, he was educated at Wellington College and (with an interruption for war service with the Middlesex Regiment) Corpus Christi College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. After graduating in 1948 he remained at Corpus as a junior research fellow then (from 1950) fellow and tutor. He was vice-president (under Sir Isaiah Berlin) and bursar of Wolfson College from 1967 to 1976, then, after a brief spell at the University of Exeter, Warden of Nuffield College from 1978 to 1988, and finally warden of St George's House, Windsor Castle, from 1988 to 1993. He was made a CBE in 1981. He was the author of an acclaimed history of the 1832 Reform Act (1973), co-editor of the nineteenth-century volumes of the history of the University, and, with his wife Eleanor, editor of H H Asquith's letters to Venetia Stanley and of Margot Asquith's war diary; the latter was published shortly after his death. He was survived by his wife Eleanor and their three sons.

 

Monty Moss

21 April 1924 - 27 April 2014

Montague George (Monty) Moss, businessman, died on 27 April 2014, aged 90. Named after an uncle who died at Passchendaele, he was educated at Harrow School and New College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics. After national service in the King's Royal Rifle Corps he joined the family firm, Moss Bros, tailors and outfitters, founded by his great-grandfather, of which he eventually became chairman. He oversaw the expansion of the firm's shops in the UK and the acquisition of Fairdale and the founding of the Suit Company; he emphasised above all the Moss Bros philosophy that, as his cousin Basil (his predecessor as chairman) put it, 'After God comes the customer'. He was a warden and vice-president of the West London Synagogue. He was survived by his wife Jane and their three children.

 

William Ash

30 November 1917 – 26 April 2014

William Franklin Ash MBE, pilot, author and political activist, died on 26 April 2014, aged 96. Born in Dallas, Texas, the son of an unsuccessful hat salesman, he paid his own way through the University of Texas at Austin. A series of jobs and an itinerant lifestyle came to an end when, following the outbreak of the Second World War, he crossed the border and enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force, serving as a Spitfire pilot. Shot down over France in 1942, he became famed for his escape attempts, and spent most of the war at Stalag Luft III. After the war (having taken British nationality and been made an MBE for his escape attempts) he went to Balliol College, Oxford, with a veteran’s scholarship to read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, He worked for a number of years for the BBC, including in India, but was eventually sacked for his political activities. He later worked freelance as a script editor and novelist, and co-founded the Communist Party of Great Britain (Marxist-Leninist). In 2005 he published his wartime memoir, Under the Wire. He was survived by his second wife, Ranjana, and the two children of his first marriage.

 

Ann Bonsor

22 September 1923 – 25 April 2014

Ann Elizabeth Bonsor, English scholar, died on 25 April 2014, aged 90. Orphaned early, she was brought up by her uncle, Sir Reginald Bonsor, second baronet, at Liscombe Park, Bedfordshire, but never took to country life. She was educated at Langford Grove, Essex, before being recruited to work first for MI5 at Blenheim Palace and then for SOE as a telegraphist and decipherer, based near Algiers, and later in Italy. On demobilisation she went to St Anne’s College, Oxford, to read English, graduating in 1948 and remaining attached to the college for another twenty years, teaching undergraduates and exchange students. She also did many interviews for Radio Oxford. She was a regular worshipper at the Church of St Mary Magdalen in the city. She never married.

 

Derek Cooper

25 May 1925 – 18 April 2014

Derek Macdonald Cooper OBE, broadcaster, journalist, and food writer, died on 18 April 2014, aged 88. He was educated at Raynes Park Grammar School, Portree High School, and University College, Cardiff, before war service in the Royal Navy. On demobilisation he went to Wadham College, Oxford, where he read English, graduating in 1950. He then spent ten years working for Radio Malaya, ending as controller of programmes, and a year with ITN before becoming a freelance radio and television broadcaster (famed for his mellifluous voice) and journalist. He was perhaps best known for The Food Programme on Radio 4. He also wrote for a wide variety of papers, mainly on food, and was the author of eighteen books, many of them on Skye (where he spent some of his childhood and later bought a cottage) and whisky. He was survived by two children, his wife Janet having predeceased him.

 

Wally Olins

19 December 1930 – 14 April 2014

Wallace (Wally) Olins CBE, brand image consultant, died on 14 April 2014, aged 83. The son of a road haulage operator, he was educated at Highgate School and St Peter’s Hall, Oxford, where he read Modern History, graduating in 1954. After national service in Germany he joined the advertising agency S. H. Benson, for whom he worked in India from 1957 to 1962. After three years with the Caps Design Group in London, he set up the brand image consultants Wolff Olins in 1961, with his friend, the graphic designer Michael Wolff. By the time Wolff left the company in 1983 it had acquired an extensive and prestigious client list, including Norton motorcycles, P&O, and LWT. In 2001 Olins sold the consultancy to the American company Omnicom for £30 million, and took on the chairmanship of the international brand consultancy Saffron. He wrote several books on corporate identity and the growth of brands. He was appointed CBE in 1999. He was survived by his wife Domie, their daughter, and the three children of his first marriage.

 

Duncan Dallas

27 October 1940 – 11 April 2014

The television presenter Duncan Munro Dallas died on 11 April 2014, aged 73. Born in Elgin, Morayshire, he was educated at various schools before entering Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Chemistry, graduating in 1964. He then joined the BBC’s graduate trainee scheme, working on the current affairs series Man Alive, before moving to Yorkshire Television in 1968. He was best known for producing scientific programmes, including Don’t Ask Me (1974-9), which made an unlikely star of Dr Magnus Pyke, and Where There’s Life (1981-6). Later he founded his own television production company, XYTV, and the Café Scientifique movement, initially in the wine bar opposite his house in Leeds. He was survived by four children, both his wives having predeceased him.

 

Patrick Seale

7 May 1930 – 11 April 2014

Patrick Abram Seale, journalist and Middle East expert, died on 11 April 2014, aged 83. Born in Belfast, the son of Morris Seale, biblical scholar and missionary, he was largely brought up in Syria, but sent home to be educated at Monkton Combe School, near Bath, and, after national service in the Intelligence Corps, Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Psychology, Philosophy and Physiology, graduating in 1953. He spent six years at Reuters before returning to Oxford, where he completed a DPhil on Syrian history. He succeeded Kim Philby as Beirut correspondent for The Economist and The Observer; he later wrote a largely sympathetic book about Philby. He subsequently worked for The Observer in France (during the events of 1968, about which he wrote another book), and London before branching out on his own as an author, freelance journalist, literary agent, and art dealer (with a gallery specialising in Middle Eastern art in Belgravia). He was survived by four children from his two marriages.

 

Sir James Holt

26 April 1922 - 9 April 2014

Sir James Clarke Holt FBA, historian, died on 9 April 2014, aged 91. Born in Yorkshire (albeit of Lancastrian parents) he was educated at Bradford Grammar School and the Queen's College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. His undergraduate career was interrupted by war service with the Royal Artillery, but he returned on demobilisation, graduated in 1947, and then, having moved to Merton College, took a DPhil in 1952 for a thesis on the northern barons under King John, the subject of one of his most successful books. He was also a noted authority on Magna Carta, and Robin Hood. He meanwhile taught at the University of Nottingham (becoming a professor in 1962) and at Reading University before moving to Cambridge as Professor of Medieval History from 1978 to 1988 and Master of Fitzwilliam College from 1981 to 1988. He was elected an FBA in 1978. He was survived by a son, his wife Betty having predeceased him.

 

A N R Robinson

16 December 1926 – 9 April 2014

Arthur Napoleon Raymond (Raymond, or more commonly A N R) Robinson SC, Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago from 1986 to 1991, died on 9 April 2014, aged 87. Born in Tobago, the son of a headmaster, he was educated at Bishop’s High School and St John’s College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1954. After being called to the bar by the Middle Temple he returned to Trinidad, where he was a founding member of the People’s National Movement, led by Eric Williams. He was minister of finance from 1961 to 1966 and of external affairs from 1967 to 1970, but in 1971 founded the Democratic Action Congress, which in alliance with the United Labour Front formed the National Alliance for Reconstruction and won the 1986 election. He came to world attention when held hostage by members of the Jamaat al Muslimeen for six days in parliament in 1990. He was later President of Trinidad and Tobago, from 1997 to 2003. He was survived by his two children, his wife Patricia having predeceased him.

 

Sir Maurice Drake

15 February 1923 – 6 April 2014

Sir (Frederick) Maurice Drake DFC, High Court judge, died on 6 April 2014, aged 91. He was educated at St George’s School, Harpenden, and, after war service as an RAF navigator, during which he was awarded the DFC, Exeter College, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence, graduating in 1948. He was called to the bar by Lincoln’s Inn in 1950, developing a busy common law practice, specialising especially in libel, and taking silk in 1968. He was deputy chairman of the Bedfordshire Quarter Sessions from 1966 to 1971, a recorder of the Crown Court from 1972 to 1978, and a judge of the High Court of Justice (Queen’s Bench Division) from 1978 to 1995. From 1991 to 1995 he was the High Court’s principal libel judge. He was known as a barrister for his eloquence and as a judge for his humour. He was survived by his wife May and their five children.

 

Archie Boyd

20 June 1918 – 4 April 2014

Wing Commander Archibald Douglas McNeill (Archie) Boyd DSO, RAF officer, died on 4 April 2014, aged 95. Born in Sheffield, he was educated at Harrow School and Trinity College, Oxford, where he joined the University Air Squadron. On the outbreak of the Second World War he left university to join the RAF, serving throughout the war as a fighter pilot, including during the Battle of Britain, in North Africa, and latterly chasing and shooting down V-1 ‘doodlebugs’. Towards the end of the war he became air attaché in Dublin, before leaving the RAF in 1946. He was a test pilot for Vickers Armstrong until 1961, when he joined Richardsons Westgarth as chief executive, where he remained until his retirement 25 years later. He was survived by three children, his wife Ursula having predeceased him.

 

William Peters

28 September 1923 – 29 March 2014

William Peters CMG, LVO, MBE, diplomat and debt campaigner, died on 29 March 2014, aged 90. Born in Morpeth, Northumberland, he was educated at King Edward VI Grammar School, Morpeth, and Balliol College, Oxford. He took the war-shortened classical moderations in 1942 before joining the army, and serving with the Gurkha Rifles in Burma. After demobilisation he returned to Balliol, graduating in Literae Humaniores in 1948. He went on to study at the LSE and SOAS before joining the overseas civil service in 1950 as an assistant district commissioner in the Gold Coast (Ghana). He subsequently served in the Commonwealth Relations Office, in Dacca and Cyprus, at the Commonwealth Secretariat, and in Canberra and Bombay before finishing his career as ambassador to Uruguay (1977-80) and High Commissioner in Malawi (1980-3). He was involved in many non-governmental organisations after his retirement. A committed Christian, in 1994 he and Martin Dent co-founded Jubilee 2000, which aimed to see the cancellation of ‘third-world’ debt by the year 2000, and which attracted worldwide attention and a degree of success. He was survived by his second wife, Gillian, and her two daughters, his first wife, Catherine, having predeceased him.

 

Richard Brain

15 September 1928 - 18 March 2014

Richard Brain, publisher and editor, died on 18 March 2014, aged 85. Born in London, the son of a tea trader, he was educated at Shrewsbury School and the Queen's College, Oxford, where he read Literae Humaniores, graduating in 1953. He spent eleven years working for the publisher Hamish Hamilton, where his clients included Nancy Mitford and Georges Simenon, before joining the London office of Oxford University Press in 1965. In the early 1980s he moved to the Times Literary Supplement as a sub-editor and guardian of house style, remaining there long past formal retirement age. He never married.

 

John Connell

29 December 1924 – 18 March 2014

John MacFarlane Connell, businessman, died on 18 March 2014, aged 89. Born in Surrey, the son of the chairman of Tanqueray Gordon, gin manufacturers, he was educated at Stowe School and, after war service in the Royal Engineers, Christ Church, Oxford, captaining the university golf club in the Varsity match against Cambridge. He left before taking a degree in order to join Tanqueray Gordon as a management trainee. He became export director in 1954 and managing director in 1962. In 1965 he joined the board of its parent company, Distillers, becoming a member of its management committee in 1971 and chairman from 1983 until its take-over by Guinness in 1986 (illegal methods in the takeover leading eventually to the jailing of Guinness’s chief executive Ernest Saunders and two associates). He then retired from public life, and to enjoy his hobbies of golf, shooting and fishing. He was survived by his wife Jean and their two sons.

 

Joseph Kerman

3 April 1924 – 17 March 2014

Joseph Wilfred Kerman, musicologist, died on 17 March 2014, aged 89. Born in London, the son of an American journalist, he was educated at University College School, London, New York University, where he studied Physics, and Princeton University, where he was awarded a PhD for a thesis on Elizabethan madrigals. He was director of graduate studies at Westminster Choir College, Princeton, before joining the music faculty of the University of California at Berkeley in 1951. From 1972 to 1974 he was Heather Professor of Music and a fellow of Wadham College, Oxford, but returned to Berkeley, where he was Professor of Music from 1974 until his retirement in 1994. He wrote prolifically, his subjects ranging from the music of William Byrd to that of Beethoven, with several books also on opera. He was elected a corresponding Fellow of the British Academy in 1984. He was survived by a son and a daughter, his wife Vivian and one son having predeceased him.

 

Tony Benn

3 April 1925 – 14 March 2014

The politician Anthony Neil Wedgwood (Tony) Benn PC died on 14 March 2014, aged 88. The second of four sons of William Wedgwood Benn, from 1941 Viscount Stansgate, the Labour politician, and his wife Margaret, a noted theologian, he was educated at Westminster School, evacuated during wartime to Herefordshire. He spent a year at New College, Oxford, before serving with the RAF (in which his elder brother also served until his death in 1944). After the war he returned to Oxford, where he graduated with a degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics in 1948 and was President of the Union. He was Labour MP for Bristol South-East from 1950 to 1960, when he succeeded his father as Viscount Stansgate. He won a by-election caused by his elevation in 1961 but was prevented from taking his seat; his case led to the act allowing hereditary peers to disclaim their peerages for life, and he returned to the Commons as MP for Bristol South-East from 1963 to 1983. Losing his seat in the 1983 general election, he returned to the Commons again as MP for Chesterfield from 1984 to 2001. He was a senior cabinet minister in Wilson’s and Callaghan’s cabinets, and, as a leader of the party’s left wing, on several occasions was unsuccessfully the candidate for the leadership or deputy leadership of the party. From 2004 he was president of the Stop the War Coalition. He was survived by his four children, his wife Caroline having predeceased him.

 

Ioan Lewis

30 January 1930 – 14 March 2014

Ioan Myrddin Lewis FBA, anthropologist, died on 14 March 2014, aged 84. He was educated at Glasgow High School before taking a BSc from Glasgow University and enrolling as a student with St Catherine’s Society, Oxford. He was awarded a Diploma in Anthropology in 1952, a BLitt in 1953, and a DPhil in 1957, the latter after working as a research assistant to Lord Hailey on his African Survey; the topic of his thesis was the Somali lineage system. Academic posts followed at the University College of Rhodesia and Nyasaland, Glasgow University, University College London, and finally the London School of Economics, where he was Professor of Anthropology from 1969 until his retirement in 1993. He was particularly noted for his work on north-east Africa, including Somalia and Somaliland. He was elected FBA in 1986. With his wife Ann he had four children.

 

Hugh Lunghi

3 August 1920 – 14 March 2014

Hugh Albert Lunghi, army officer, diplomat, interpreter, broadcaster, and campaigner for freedom of expression, died on 14 March 2014, aged 93. He was educated at Abingdon School (where he was head boy, and captain of the rugby XV for three years) and Pembroke College, Oxford. He took the war-shortened classical moderations in 1940 before joining the Royal Artillery. A fluent Russian speaker (his grandmother was a refugee from the Bolshevik Revolution), he was posted to the British Military Mission in Moscow in 1943, and acted as interpreter for Winston Churchill and Clement Attlee at the conferences in Tehran, Yalta and Potsdam. After demobilisation he joined the Foreign Service, but in 1954 he left to join the BBC World Service, becoming head of the Central European department. In 1980 he became editor of Index on Censorship. He had four daughters by two marriages; his second wife, Renée, predeceased him.

 

Marilyn Butler

11 February 1937 – 11 March 2014

Marilyn Speers Butler (née Evans) FBA, Rector of Exeter College, Oxford, from 1993 to 2004, died on 11 March 2014, aged 77. Born in Kingston upon Thames, the daughter of Sir Trevor Evans, industrial correspondent for the Daily Express, she was educated at Wimbledon High School and St Hilda’s College, Oxford, where she read English, graduating in 1958 and staying on to gain a DPhil in 1966 for a thesis on the novels of Maria Edgeworth, whose complete works she subsequently edited. She also became a noted authority on Jane Austen and Mary Wollstonecraft, and on the literature and culture of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Britain. She taught at St Hilda’s for some years before becoming a fellow and tutor at St Hugh’s in 1973. From 1986 to 1993 she was King Edward VII Professor of English Literature at Cambridge before taking up her post as Rector of Exeter College. In 1962 she married the political scientist David Butler, who was knighted in 2011. He survived her, as did two sons, one son having predeceased her.

 

Eric Sainsbury

16 December 1925 – 11 March 2014

Eric Edward Sainsbury OBE, social work researcher, died on 11 March 2014, aged 88. Born in Newham, east London, the son of a wages clerk at the London docks, he grew up in Leigh-on-Sea then Formby, Lancashire (after his father had been transferred to Liverpool docks). He was educated at Southport High School and, after war service as a Bevin boy at Barnburgh colliery, Balliol College, Oxford, where he read English, graduating in 1950. He taught in a school for three years before taking diplomas at the University of Sheffield and the London School of Economics and becoming a probation officer. In 1961 he returned to the University of Sheffield as a tutor in social work and remained there until his retirement in 1988, latterly as a professor. He was particularly known for his advocacy of involving service users in the shaping of social services. He was also a member of several government advisory bodes. He was survived by his wife Audrey, their son having predeceased him.

 

Cora Portillo

8 January 1919 – 10 March 2014

Cora Waldegrave Portillo (née Blyth), teacher, died on 10 March 2014, aged 95. The daughter of a Kirkcaldy factory owner, she was educated at St Leonard’s School for Girls, St Andrews, and St Hilda’s College, Oxford, where she read Spanish and French, graduating in 1940. In 1941 she married Luis Gabriel Portillo, a refugee from the Spanish Civil War, later a BBC producer, lecturer and poet. She herself later taught French and Spanish in secondary schools. She was at first a keen Labour supporter, but later switched her allegiance to the Liberal Democrats; she was also an active member of Amnesty International. She was survived by four sons, her husband Luis and one son having predeceased her. Her youngest son was the Conservative politician Michael Portillo.

 

John Tyson

7 April 1928 – 10 March 2014

The mountaineer John Baird Tyson OBE, MC, died on 10 March 2014, aged 85. Born in Scotland but raised in London, the son of the deputy headmaster of St Paul’s, he was educated at Rugby School, and, after national service in Malaya (during which he was awarded the Military Cross), Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read Geography, graduating in 1952. He taught at the Outward Bound Mountain School at Eskdale, under the famed mountaineer Eric Shipton, and at Rugby School and Christ’s Hospital before taking up the headmastership of the National School in Thimphu, Bhutan, and then the National School in Kathmandu. He was appointed OBE in 1989. He was renowned for his mapping, over a ten-year period in the 1960s and early 1970s, of the west-central Himalayas around Mount Kanjiroba, a tangle of gorges, ridges and peaks, many of which he climbed for the first time. In retirement he lived in the Lake District. He was survived by his wife, Phebe, and their three children.

 

Sir Hugh Leggatt

27 February 1925 – 8 March 2014

Sir Hugh Frank John Leggatt, art dealer and campaigner for the national heritage, died on 8 March 2014, aged 89. He was educated at Eton College and New College, Oxford, before serving in the RAF from 1943 to 1946. After demobilisation he decided against completing his Oxford degree, instead going straight into the family firm of Leggatt Bros, art dealers, the fifth generation of his family to do so. He was senior partner from 1962 to 1992 when, by agreement with his sons, the firm was wound up after 172 years. He was an astute dealer, and identified many previously lost masterpieces. He pursued a parallel career as a longstanding adviser to the National Portrait Galleries of London and Edinburgh, and as an indefatigable campaigner for the retention of Britain’s artistic heritage. From 1974 he was honorary secretary of Heritage in Danger, and for nine years he was the sole art dealer on the Museums and Galleries Commission. He was also a generous benefactor himself, most recently funding the National Portrait Gallery’s first official portrait of the Duchess of Cambridge. He was survived by his wife Gaynor and the two sons of his first marriage.

 

Sir Thomas Chitty

2 March 1926 – 7 March 2014

Sir Thomas Willes Chitty, third baronet, author (as Thomas Hinde), died on 7 March 2014, aged 88. Born in Felixstowe, the son of the second baronet, he was educated at Winchester College and University College, Oxford, where he read Modern History, but his education was interrupted by war and postwar service with the Royal Navy. After demobilisation he returned to Oxford, graduating in 1950. He worked for seven years in public relations for Shell, but left in 1960. His first novel, Mr Nicholas (1952), based loosely on his dysfunctional father, was a great success, and led to comparisons with Graham Greene. While he produced thereafter a steady stream of fiction and non-fiction (including the commissioned histories of half a dozen public schools and several books on self-sufficiency, which he practised with his wife, the writer Susan Chitty, daughter of the novelist Antonia White), none of his later books achieved quite the same degree of success. He was survived by Susan and their four children, three of whom joined them on an eighteen-month journey in the footsteps of Hannibal, which resulted in their parents’ jointly-authored The Great Donkey Walk (1977).

 

Gurth Hoyer Millar

13 December 1929 – 6 March 2014

Gurth Christian Hoyer Millar, sportsman and businessman, died on 6 March 2014, aged 84. Born in Chelsea into a family with a strong army tradition, he was educated at Harrow School and, after national service with special forces in the Malayan emergency, Lincoln College, Oxford, where he read Jurisprudence, played for the cricket first eleven, and won Blues for boxing and rugby; he also played rugby for Scotland. He was called to the bar in 1954 and went on to take a postgraduate law course at the University of Michigan, but decided on a business career, initially with BP. In 1967 he became a director of Sainsbury’s, leading the launch of Homebase, of which he was the first chairman. He was later chairman of Bonhams auction house, besides many other directorships. He contested several elections between 1959 and 1974 for the Liberal Party, but on each occasion was unsuccessful. He was survived by his wife Jane and their three children.

 

Iain Campbell

24 April 1941 – 5 March 2014

Iain Donald Campbell FRS, physicist and biochemist, died on 5 March 2014, aged 72. Born at Blackford, near Perth, he attended Perth Academy and St Andrews University, where he read Physics. After graduating in 1963 he went on to complete a PhD in 1967. He moved to Oxford the same year, to join Sir Rex Richards’s laboratory. He became a university lecturer in the Department of Biochemistry in 1976, a tutorial fellow at St John’s College in 1989, and Professor of Structural Biology from 1992 until his retirement in 2009, when he became an emeritus professor. He was best known for his work on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which he applied in particular to the structure of proteins, and his work on cell migration and cell adhesion, all areas with important ramifications for the treatment of cancer. He was elected an FRS in 1995. He was survived by his wife Karin and their three children.

 

Dame Elaine Kellett-Bowman

8 July 1923 – 4 March 2014

Dame Elaine Kellett-Bowman (née Kay), DBE, politician, died on 4 March 2014, aged 90. She was educated at Queen Mary School, Lytham, The Mount, in York, and St Anne’s College, Oxford, where she read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1944. She went on to do a diploma in social work at Barnett House, Oxford. For many years a working farmer, she also studied law, and was called to the bar in 1964. Having unsuccessfully contested seats from 1955, she was Conservative MP for Lancaster from 1970 to 1997, and an MEP both unelected and elected, from 1975 to 1984. She was appointed DBE in 1988. She was survived by the four children of her first marriage to Charles Kellett (who was killed in a car accident in which she was also severely injured, in 1959), and her second husband, Edward Bowman (who adopted the name Kellett-Bowman), Conservative MEP from 1979 to 1984 and again from 1988 to 1999.

 

Norman Scarfe

1 May 1923 – 2 March 2014

Norman Scarfe MBE, historian, died on 2 March 2014, aged 90. Born in Felixstowe, he was educated at the town’s grammar school, and King’s School, Canterbury. His further education reading Modern History at Magdalen College, Oxford, was interrupted by the Second World War, during which he served with the Suffolk Regiment in France and Germany. After the war he resumed his studies at Oxford, graduating in 1949, then took a post at the University of Leicester, under the pioneering local historian W.G. Hoskins. He became a leading authority on the history of East Anglia, particularly Suffolk, and also translated and edited the journals of François de la Rochefoucauld, a refugee from the French Revolution. He was survived by his partner, Paul Fincham.

 

David Fisher

13 May 1947 – 28 February 2014

David Richard Fisher, civil servant and moral philosopher, died on 28 February 2014, aged 66. Educated at Reading School and St John’s College, Oxford, where he read Literae Humaniores, after graduating in 1969 he joined the Ministry of Defence in 1970. His civil service career included oversight of the defence budget as well as periods of secondment to NATO and the Cabinet Office. A visiting research fellowship at Nuffield College, Oxford, in 1983-4 resulted in Morality and the Bomb (1985), and after retiring from the civil service in 2007 he studied for a PhD at King’s College London, awarded in 2010 and resulting in an acclaimed book on Morality and War (2011). From 2010 he was a teaching fellow at King’s College London. He was survived by his wife Sophy and their two daughters.

 

Margaret Pawley

22 March 1922 - 28 February 2014

Margaret Grozier Pawley (née Herbertson), Special Operations officer and church historian, died on 28 February 2014, aged 91. Born in Koblenz, the daughter of a civil servant then serving with the Control Commission for Germany, she was educated at Stratford House School in Kent and at a secretarial college. During the Second World War she worked at the New Zealand Air Force headquarters in London before being recruited into the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry and serving with the Special Operations Executive in Egypt and Italy. After the war she read Modern History at St Anne's College, Oxford, graduating in 1950, and worked for the Women's Institute. In 1958 she married the Rev. Bernard Pawley, eventually archdeacon of Canterbury. She wrote histories of the Allied Control Commission in interwar Germany and of FANY and the SOE in the Mediterranean, but was chiefly noted for her works of church history, which included biographies of Donald Coggan and Ambrose Phillipps de Lisle. She was survived by two children, her husband having predeceased her.

 

Bryan Clarke

24 June 1932 – 27 February 2014

Bryan Campbell Clarke FRS, geneticist, died on 27 February 2014, aged 81. Born in Nottinghamshire, after his father’s death in 1941 he was sent to live with friends in Massachusetts, and was educated at Fay School, Southborough, before returning to England. He continued his education at Magdalen College School, Oxford, and, after national service in the RAF, Magdalen College, where he read Zoology and completed a DPhil. In 1959 he took a post at the University of Edinburgh, where he remained until 1971, when he moved to the University of Nottingham as a professor until his retirement in 1997. He was a renowned authority on ecological genetics and evolution, in particular through his work on different types of snail. In Nottingham he set up the Frozen Ark, a scheme to preserve the genes and cells of endangered creatures, involving twenty-two zoos and research institutions in eight countries. He was elected an FRS in 1982. He was survived by his wife Ann and their two children.

 

Susan Hillyard

2 May 1926 – 16 February 2014

Susan Hillyard (née Wood), teacher and author, died on 16 February 2014, aged 87. Born in Weybridge, Surrey, the daughter of the literary agent Ronald Watt, she was educated at Cheltenham Ladies’ College and Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, where she read Modern History and served as secretary to the University Conservative Association. After graduating in 1946 she taught at Jersey College for Girls, Châtelard School, Switzerland, and St Helen’s School, Quebec, before marrying Tim Hillyard, a BP executive. They spent three years in Iraq then five in Abu Dhabi before oil production began; she later wrote about her time there in Before the Oil (2002). Her husband’s further postings took them to Canada, Alaska, Libya and Australia before they returned to England. After Tim’s death in 1973 Susan Hillyard settled in Derbyshire. She was survived by her two daughters.

 

Lorna Casselton

18 July 1938 – 14 February 2014

The biologist Lorna Ann Casselton (née Smith) CBE, FRS, died on 14 February, aged 75. Educated at Southend High School for Girls and University College, London, where she graduated with a BSc and took her PhD in 1964, she taught at Royal Holloway College and Queen Mary College (subsequently Queen Mary and Westfield College), latterly as a professor, before moving to Oxford as a postdoctoral fellow, senior research fellow, and from 1997 to 2003 Professor of Fungal Genetics. She was a fellow of St Cross College from 1993 to 2003. Renowned for her work in particular on fungal sexual determination and reproduction (there being some 12,000 sexes of the mushroom fungus Coprinus cinereus, which she studied intensively), she was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1999 and served as its foreign secretary from 2006 to 2011. She was appointed CBE in 2012. She was survived by her second husband, William Tollett, with whom she shared a passion for adventure and travel.

 

William Duff

13 May 1922 – 14 February 2014

William Robert Duff, banker and adviser to the royal family of Dubai, died on 14 February 2014, aged 91. Born in Singapore, the son of an engineer, he was educated at Cheltenham College and Oriel College, Oxford, where he took the war-shortened classical moderations in 1942. After war service he joined the British Bank of the Middle East. He worked in several countries in the region before being persuaded to become an adviser to the ruling family of Kuwait then, from 1960, to Sheikh Rashid of Dubai. When he arrived there (six years before the discovery of oil), there were just 16 Britons living in Dubai. He was a key adviser in the subsequent growth of the city and of the United Arab Emirates. By the time of his death, at his home in Jumeirah, it was estimated that there were around 100,000 Britons in Dubai alone. He was survived by his Polish wife, Irenka, and their two daughters.

 

Joan Mitchell

15 March 1920 - 13 February 2014

The economist Joan Eileen Mitchell died on 13 February 2014, aged 93. Born in Hackney, she was educated at Southend High School for Girls and St Hilda's College, Oxford, where she read Philosophy, Politics and Economics. After graduating in 1942 she worked as a temporary civil servant at the Ministry of Fuel and Power. From 1945 to 1947 he returned to Oxford as a tutor at St Anne's College; subsequently she worked as an economist for the Board of Trade then as a research officer for the Labour Party before joining the staff of the University of Nottingham in 1952, becoming a reader in economics in 1962 and professor from 1978 until her retirement in 1985. She was particularly noted for her work on economic planning, and was an adviser to several Labour figures, and a member of government committees when Labour was in power; in 1956 she married the influential Labour Party organiser, Jim Cattermole. He died in 2007; she was survived by their two children.

 

Stuart Hall

3 February 1932 – 10 February 2014

The sociologist and political theorist Stuart McPhail Hall FBA died on 10 February 2014, aged 82. Born in Kingston, Jamaica, the son of a chief accountant with United Fruit, he was educated at Jamaica College and, as a Rhodes Scholar, Merton College, Oxford, where he read English, graduating in 1954. He started a PhD in London on Henry James, but abandoned it to become editor of the New Left Review from 1957 to 1961. Thereafter he pursued an academic career. From 1972 to 1979 he was director of the Centre for Cultural Studies at the University of Birmingham, and from 1979 to 1998 he was Professor of Sociology at the Open University. He was the author of a number of books on cultural politics, and was famous for inventing the term Thatcherism, to describe the seismic shift represented by Thatcher’s brand of politics. He was a frequent commentator on television and in other media. He was elected an FBA in 2005. He was survived by his wife, the historian Catherine Barrett, and their two children.

 

Michael Baldwin

1 May 1930 – 3 February 2014

The poet and novelist Michael Jesse Baldwin FRSL died on 3 February 2014, aged 83. Born in Gravesend, the son of a furniture shop proprietor, he was educated at Gravesend Grammar School and, after national service in the Thames and Medway Coast Artillery Regiment, St Edmund Hall, Oxford, where he read English. Graduating in 1953, he took up teaching, at St Clement Danes Grammar School then Whitelands College of Education, Putney; he was also a regular tutor for the Arvon Foundation. He began publishing poetry in the 1950s, and his collection King Horn (1983) won the Cholmondeley Award. Among his novels were the historical romances The First Mrs Wordsworth (1996) and Dark Lady (1999). He was survived by his wife Gillian, their son, and the two sons of his first marriage.

 

Noel Gale

24 December 1931 – 3 February 2014

Noel Harold Gale, physicist, died on 3 February 2014, aged 82. Born in Valletta, Malta, the son of a seaman in the Royal Navy, he was educated at Brockenhurst Grammar School and Imperial College, London, where he read Physics. He went on to take another degree, in Pure Physics, at Manchester University, and a PhD at St Bartholomew’s Hospital, on the medical applications of nuclear physics. He worked for a few years at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, before becoming a lecturer in the Department of Geology, Oxford. He was a fellow of Nuffield College from 1987 to 1999, and an emeritus fellow thereafter. With his then wife, Zofia Stos-Gale, he founded the Isotrace Laboratory in Oxford, and his work using isotope fingerprinting led to important discoveries concerning the trade in Aegean Bronze Age metals. He was survived by his third wife, Daphne, and by three sons.

 

Nicholas Brooks

14 January 1941 – 2 February 2014

The historian Nicholas Peter Brooks FBA died on 2 February 2014, aged 73. Born in Surrey, the son of a consultant physician, he was educated at Winchester College and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read Modern History, graduating in 1962. He stayed on to do research for a DPhil thesis on Anglo-Saxon Canterbury, which he completed in 1969. Meanwhile, he taught at St Andrews University from 1964 to 1985 before taking up the chair of medieval history at the University of Birmingham, becoming an emeritus professor in 2004. He was a leading authority on the Anglo-Saxon church, but he ranged more widely, both in topic matter and in chronological range. He was elected an FBA in 1989 and from 1991 presided over the British Academy’s charters project; with Susan Kelly he edited the complete Charters of Christ Church Canterbury in two volumes (2013). He was survived by his wife Chloë and their two children.

 

Sebastian Barker

16 April 1945 – 31 January 2014

The poet Sebastian Smart Barker FRSL died on 31 January 2014, aged 68. The son of the poet George Barker and his wife Elizabeth Smart, author of By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept, he was educated at the King’s School, Canterbury, and Corpus Christi College, Oxford, where he read Chemistry, followed by a master’s degree in English at the University of East Anglia. He subsequently took a variety of jobs, from furniture salesman to Sotheby’s cataloguer while pursuing his vocation as a poet, known for his lyrical approach and philosophical subject matter. His last book, The Land of Gold, was published shortly before his death. He was active in Pen and the Poetry Society, and from 2002 to 2008 was editor of the London Magazine. He was received into the Roman Catholic church in 1997. He was survived by his wife Hilary and four children from his two previous marriages.

 

Kenneth Rose

15 November 1924 – 28 January 2014

The journalist and author Kenneth Vivian Rose CBE died on 28 January 2014, aged 89. Born in Bradford, the son of a doctor, he was educated at Repton School and New College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. He took the war-shortened part one in 1943 then, after war service with the Welsh Guards, returned to graduate in 1947. He spent four years as an assistant master at Eton before joining the staff of the Daily Telegraph, where he served his apprenticeship on the ‘Peterborough’ column. From 1961 to 1997 he was gossip columnist for the Sunday Telegraph, initially under the pseudonym Albany. He was known in particular for his friendships in royal circles. He wrote a number of books about royalty and several biographies, his subjects including Lord Curzon and Victor Rothschild. His biography of King George V (1983) won both the Wolfson and the Whitbread awards. He was unmarried.

 

St Clair Tisdall

2 April 1921 – 20 January 2014

(Wilfred) St Clair Tisdall MC, army officer and schoolmaster, died on 20 January 2014, aged 92. Born in Cheshire, the son of a rural dean, he was educated at Dean Close School, Cheltenham, and Wadham College, Oxford, where he read Modern Languages. His Oxford education was interrupted by war service in the King’s Royal Irish Hussars, in North Africa (where he was aide-de-camp to Major-General, later Lord, Harding), and, shortly after D-Day, north-west Europe, winning an MC in the battle for s’Hertogenbosch in 1944. He later served in Korea, in Germany with the British Army of the Rhine, and in Bahrain. He retired from the army with the rank of major in 1965 and then taught Latin for a number of years at Packwood Haugh School, a preparatory school near Shrewsbury. He was survived by his two daughters, his wife Prue having predeceased him.

 

Sir Chris Chataway

31 January 1931 – 19 January 2014

The athlete, politician and businessman Sir Christopher John (Chris) Chataway PC died on 19 January 2014, aged 82. The son of a colonial official in the Sudan, he was educated at Sherborne School and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1953. A talented athlete, he was president of the University Athletics Club. On 6 May 1954 he and Christopher Brasher paced Roger Bannister when Bannister became the first man to run a mile in under four minutes, at the Iffley Road running track. On 13 October that year Chataway broke the world 5,000 metres record. Shortly after, he became the first winner of the BBC Sports Personality of the Year award. He also represented Great Britain at the 1952 and 1956 Olympics. He was an executive for Guinness and then a reporter for ITN and the BBC before becoming Conservative MP for Lewisham North (1959-66) and then after a by-election for Chichester (1969-74), serving at various points as a junior minister. He left parliament in 1974 to concentrate on his business interests, which included chairmanships or directorships of many leading companies. He was chairman of LBC from 1981 to 1993 and of the Civil Aviation Authority from 1991 to 1996. He was closely involved in Action Aid as treasurer then chairman, and in many other charities. He was knighted in 1995. He was survived by his wife Carola, their two sons, and three children of his first marriage.

 

Sir Nicholas Browne

17 December 1947 – 13 January 2014

Sir Nicholas Walker Browne KBE, CMG, died on 13 January 2014, aged 66. Born in West Malling, Kent, the son of an army officer, he was educated at Cheltenham College and University College, Oxford, where he read Modern History and captained the college rugby team. He joined the Foreign Office immediately after graduating, in 1969. He served in Tehran from 1971 to 1974, and later, while seconded to the Cabinet Office, wrote an influential report on Britain’s failure to anticipate the fall of the Shah in 1979. He subsequently served in Salisbury (Harare), Brussels and Washington, but was regarded as the Foreign Office’s expert on Iran, and served as head of the Middle East Department at the FCO (1994-7) and chargé d’affaires in Tehran (1997-9) before becoming Ambassador there (1999-2002). His final posts were as senior director (civil) at the Royal College of Defence Studies (2002-3) and ambassador to Denmark (2003-6). He was knighted in 2002. He was survived by his wife, Diana, two sons (one of them Jeremy Browne, Lib Dem MP for Taunton Deane), and two daughters.

 

Nick Bevan

21 February 1942 – 12 January 2014

Nicholas Vaughan (Nick) Bevan, headmaster and rowing coach, died on 12 January 2014, aged 71. From a rowing family (his father had rowed for Isis, three uncles had taken part in the Boat Race, and one of them had gone on to win an Olympic gold), he was educated at Shrewsbury School and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Geography, graduating in 1963, and winning his Blue in the successful Oxford crew that year. After serving with the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry for five years and taking a Cambridge diploma in education he followed his father into schoolteaching. At Shrewsbury between 1972 and 1988 he coached the school’s crew to the final of the Schools Race at Henley eleven times (winning seven times), and in 1982 his crew won the ‘triple’ of Schools Head of the River, National Schools Regatta and Henley. From 1988 to 2004 he was headmaster of Shiplake College, near Henley. After retiring to North Aston he coached the Balliol College Women’s VIII. He was survived by his wife Annabel, their two children, and two children from his first marriage.

 

Pamela Vandyke Price

21 March 1923 – 12 January 2014

Pamela Joan Vandyke Price, wine writer, died on 12 January 2014, aged 90. Brought up in Coventry, the daughter of a clockmaker, she was educated privately and (as Pamela Walford) at Somerville College, Oxford, where she read English, graduating in 1943. In 1950 she married a doctor, Alan Vandyke Price, who died five years later. She began writing about food and wine while household editor of House and Garden in the early 1950s; she was subsequently wine correspondent for The Times, the Sunday Times and The Observer. She wrote five cookery books and more than twenty books about wine, as well as an autobiography, Woman of Taste (1990).

 

Patrick McAuslan

19 January 1937 – 11 January 2014

The legal scholar (John) Patrick William Buchanan McAuslan MBE died on 11 January 2014, aged 76. Born in Bournemouth, he was educated at Shrewsbury School and Wadham College, Oxford, where he took a degree in Jurisprudence in 1960 and a BCL in 1961. After a short spell at the University of Dar es Salaam he taught at the London School of Economics, then the fledgling Warwick University, where he was promoted professor in 1974, then again at the London School of Economics from 1986 to 1990. Thereafter he combined a post at Birkbeck College with an active role advising governments in Africa and elsewhere on land reform. Among his books was The Ideologies of Planning Law (1980), which argued that planning law had almost invariably served the interests of private property and the wealthy. He was survived by his wife Dorrette and their daughter.

 

Frank Whitford

11 August 1941 – 11 January 2014

Francis Peter (Frank) Whitford, art historian and cartoonist, died on 11 January 2014, aged 72. Born in Bishopstoke, Hampshire, he was educated at Peter Symonds School, Winchester, and Wadham College, Oxford, where he read English, graduating in 1963. He went on to the Courtauld Institute, London, where he gained a diploma in art history. After a few years as a cartoonist for London papers he returned to academia, as a lecturer in art history at University College, London, then Homerton College, Cambridge. He also taught at the Royal College of Art, and from 1983 was a senior member of Wolfson College, Cambridge. He was an expert on twentieth-century German and Austrian art, on which he published several books. He also continued, part-time, his career as a cartoonist and later an art critic, for the Sunday Times and the Cambridge Evening News. He was survived by his wife Cecilia (Cici).

 

Sir Run Run Shaw

23 November 1907 – 7 January 2014

Sir Run Run Shaw CBE, the Hong Kong-based film producer, media entrepreneur and philanthropist, died on 7 January 2014, aged 106. Born in Ningbo, in Zhejiang province, China, the son of a textile merchant, he left China for Singapore in 1927, setting up the South Sea Film Company in 1930, and subsequently Shaw Brothers, which soon owned more than 100 cinemas in Singapore, Malaya, and elsewhere in south-east Asia. In the 1950s he moved to Hong Kong, from where he ran an empire which encompassed film production and distribution, financing, and television production. He was a generous philanthropist, his endowments running into hundreds of millions of dollars. He was knighted in 1977. In 1990 he endowed the Run Run Shaw Chair of Chinese at Oxford, and in 1992 he was awarded an honorary doctorate by the University. He was survived by his wife, Mona Fong, and the four children of his first marriage.

 

John Snell

1 January 1932 – 3 January 2014

John Bernard Snell, railway manager and heritage railway enthusiast, died on 3 January 2014, aged 82. Born in Fiji and brought up in New Zealand, he went to Bryanston School and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1954. Abandoning plans for a career in the law, he joined first London Transport then British Rail, where he worked as a senior executive. He was a volunteer fireman on the inaugural journey of the Talyllyn Railway following its renovation by the Talyllyn Railway Preservation Society, in 1951. He went on to advise the Ffestiniog and Bluebell railways, among many others, and from 1972 to 1999 was managing director of the Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway, about which he wrote in One Man’s Railway (1983). He was unmarried.