Compiled by Dr Alex May

 

Hugh Peppiatt

18 August 1930 – 31 December 2016

Hugh Stephen Kenneth Peppiatt, solicitor, died on 31 December 2016, aged 86. Born in Beaconsfield, he was the son of Sir Leslie Peppiatt, solicitor, and later senior partner of Freshfields, who oversaw the postwar expansion of the firm to become one of the most prominent in the City. Hugh Peppiatt was educated at Winchester College and, after national service in the Coldstream Guards, Trinity College, Oxford, where he read modern history, graduating in 1953. He spent a year at the University of Wisconsin on a Harkness scholarship but on his return opted for a legal career, and was articled to his father. He became a partner at Freshfields in 1960, resident partner in New York in 1977, and senior partner from 1982 to 1990. In retirement he held a number of company directorships and was chairman of Moorfields Eye Hospital. He was survived by his wife, Claire, and their five children.

Eric Taylor

8 May 1928 – 25 December 2016

The musicologist Eric Robert Taylor died on 25 December 2016, aged 88. Born in Leamington Spa, he was educated locally and sang in the choir at St Mary’s Collegiate Church, Warwick. He won an organ scholarship to Christ Church, Oxford, taking his BM in 1954 and a DMus in 1961. He was a lecturer in music at the University of Reading from 1959 before becoming professor of music at Durham University in 1969. He was especially known for his championship of oriental music, including through the Durham Oriental Music Festival, which he founded in 1976, and for his work on musical theory, including The AB Guide to Music Theory, for the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music. His wife Mary predeceased him, and he was survived by their two sons.

Nicholas Berry

3 July 1942 — 25 December 2016                 

The entrepreneur Nicholas Berry died on 25 December 2016, aged 74. The younger son of Michael Berry, later Lord Hartwell, newspaper proprietor, and the grandson of William Berry, first Viscount Camrose, and F E Smith, first Earl of Birkenhead, he was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford. Like his elder brother Adrian, later fourth Viscount Camrose (see obituary, 18 April 2016) he initially joined the family’s paper, the Daily Telegraph, working on the City desk. But in 1972 he left to form his own investment firm, Stancroft Trust. He was a notably shrewd investor, and among the businesses he came to own were the publisher Harrap’s, the market research group Mintel, and the Swiss skiwear retailer, Intersport. He was also at one point chairman of the Manchester Ship Canal, before selling his stake for a £35 million profit. He divided his time between a townhouse in Cowley Street, Westminster, and an estate in the Sologne region of France. He was survived by his French wife, Evelyne, and their two sons.

Richard Adams

9 May 1920 – 24 December 2016

The author Richard George Adams died on 24 December 2016, aged 96. Born in Newbury, the son of a doctor, he was educated at Bradfield College and, after war service with the army in the Western Desert, Worcester College, Oxford; just before sitting finals he suffered a nervous breakdown and was found slumped in the Provost’s chair but he took his examinations in hospital, and in 1948 entered the home civil service. He made slow progress through the hierarchy and two years after the publication of his first book and most successful book, Watership Down (1972), he retired from the Department of the Environment with the rank of assistant secretary. Famously curmudgeonly, he disliked the 1978 film directed and produced by Martin Rosen. Among his other books were The Plague Dogs (1977) and The Girl in a Swing (1980), both also filmed. He spent some years as a tax exile on the Isle of Man but returned in later life to live in Whitchurch, near the real Watership Down. He was survived by his wife Elizabeth and their two daughters.

Sir Nigel Nicholls

19 February 1938 – 21 December 2016

The civil servant Sir Nigel Hamilton Nicholls KCVO, CBE, died on 21 December 2016, aged 78. Born in Dorking, he was educated at the King’s School, Canterbury, and, after national service with the Royal Artillery, St John’s College, Oxford, where he read Greats. On graduating in 1962 he joined the Admiralty, which in 1964 was merged into the Ministry of Defence. He occupied a key position in the Defence Secretariat during the Falklands War, overseeing logistical arrangements for the task force, and later took on the same role for British forces engaged in NATO operations. He ended his civil service career as assistant under-secretary of state (systems). From 1992 to 1998 he was clerk of the Privy Council. He was knighted on retirement from this post, following which he retired to Malvern. He was survived by his wife, Isobel, and their two sons.

Sir Alan Urwick

2 May 1930 – 8 December 2016

The diplomat Sir Alan Bedford Urwick KCVO, CMG, died on 8 December 2016, aged 86. Born in London, the son of Lyndall Urwick, army officer and pioneer of scientific business management and his wife Joan Bedford, chief assistant to Ewen Montagu of the wartime counter-intelligence unit, Section 17M, he was educated at Rugby School and, after national service, New College, Oxford, where he read modern history, graduating in 1952. He joined the Foreign Service (initially working for MI6) the same year, and after postings to Brussels, Moscow, Baghdad, Amman, and (after transferring to the diplomatic service proper) Washington, Cairo and Madrid, as well as increasingly senior posts in London, he was ambassador to Jordan (1979-84) and Egypt (1985-7) and High Commissioner to Canada (1987-9). He was knighted KCVO in 1984. On retirement from the diplomatic service he was Serjeant at Arms of the House of Commons until 1995. He was survived by his wife, Marta, and their three sons.

John Stoye

12 August 1917 – 5 December 2016

The historian John Walter Stoye died on 5 December 2016, aged 99. Born in London, the son of a silversmiths’ designer, he was educated at Wychwood School, Stowe School (where he was head boy and a contemporary of Noel Annan and Nico Henderson), and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read modern history, graduating in 1939. During the Second World War, as a conscientious objector he worked in a radar factory and as a fire watcher. After the war he was a junior research fellow at Corpus Christi College before being elected a fellow of Magdalen College in 1948; he remained there as a tutorial fellow until 1984, when he became an emeritus fellow. A specialist on seventeenth-century European history, his books included English Travellers Abroad, 1604-1667 (1952), The Siege of Vienna (1964), and an acclaimed biography of the Habsburg general and ambassador Luigi Ferdinando Marsigli (1994). He was predeceased by his wife, Catherine, but survived by their four sons.

Patricia Crampton

12 December 1925 – 1 December 2016

The translator Patricia Crampton (née Cardew-Wood) died on 1 December 2016, aged 90. Born in Bombay, the daughter of an engineer (who later managed the SOE station at Aston House, near Stevenage), she was brought up in Beaconsfield. She read modern languages at St Hugh’s College, Oxford, graduating in German and French in 1946. She then spent two years as a translator at the Nuremburg trials before returning to London, where she worked for various international companies and for Nato before finding her métier as a translator primarily of children’s books. She became proficient in Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish and Russian as well as French and German; among the authors she translated were the Dutch author Paul Biegel, the Danish author Anne Holm, and the Swedish author Astrid Lindgren. She was awarded the Eleanor Farjeon award for services to children’s literature in 1991. Her husband, the sculptor Sean Crampton, predeceased her, and she was survived by their two children.

Margaret Belcher

8 September 1936 – 29 November 2016

The Pugin scholar Margaret Belcher died on 29 November 2016, aged 80. Born in Christchurch, New Zealand, she was educated at Rangi Ruru girls’ school, the University of Canterbury, where she read English, and St Hugh’s College, Oxford, where she studied from 1958 to 1960. She returned to the University of Canterbury, where she joined the staff in 1962, took her doctorate, and became senior lecturer in the department of English. She was best known for her work on the Victorian architect Augustus Pugin, and in particular her annotated critical bibliography (1987) and her meticulously edited five-volume compilation of his letters, published by Oxford University Press between 2001 and 2015. She was unmarried.

Sir John Swire

28 February 1927 – 28 November 2016

The businessman Sir John Anthony Swire CBE died on 28 November 2016, aged 89. The son of Jock Swire, later chairman of the Hong Kong-based Swire group, and great-great-grandson of John Swire, founder of the company, he was educated at Eton and, after service with the Irish Guards in Palestine, University College, Oxford, where he read modern history. On graduating in 1950 he joined Butterfield & Swire, part of the Swire group, becoming an executive director of John Swire & Sons in 1995, chairman from 1966 to 1987 (when he handed over to his brother Adrian), and president thereafter. He was closely involved in the recovery of the firm’s fortunes after the Second World War, and its massive expansion across east Asia. He was knighted in 1990 and was an honorary fellow of University and St Antony’s colleges. Among his philanthropic gifts was £1 million to University College to support graduate historians. He was survived by his wife Moira and their three children.

Tim Heald

28 January 1944 – 20 November 2016

Timothy Villiers (Tim) Heald, journalist and author, died on 20 November 2016, aged 72. Born in Dorchester, the son of an army officer, he was educated at Sherborne School and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read modern history. After graduating he worked for the Sunday Times (on the ‘Atticus’ column) and the Daily Express before turning freelance. He contributed features, opinion pieces, interviews and book reviews for a variety of papers, while also turning out a steady stream of fiction and non-fiction books. Notably he produced a series of books on the royal family, including biographies of the Duke of Edinburgh (1991) and Princess Margaret (2007), and a series of humorous detective novels featuring Simon Bognor. He was survived by his second wife, Penny, and the four children of his first marriage, which ended in divorce.

Sir Aubrey Trotman-Dickenson

12 February 1926 – 11 November 2016

Sir Aubrey Fiennes Trotman-Dickenson, chemist and university administrator, died on 11 November 2016 aged 90. Born in Wilmslow, Cheshire, he was educated at Winchester College and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read chemistry and won a half-blue in cross-country running. After spells with the National Research Council in Ottawa, as ICI fellow at Manchester University, in industry with DuPont in the USA, and as a lecturer at Edinburgh University, he was appointed professor of chemistry at the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth, in 1960. In 1968 he became principal of the University of Wales Institute of Science and Technology, leading it through its merger with University College Cardiff and remaining principal of the combined University of Wales College of Cardiff from 1988 to 1993. He served as vice-chancellor of the University of Wales on three occasions, in 1975-7, 1983-5 and 1991-3. Early in his career he published on gas kinetics and free radicals, and was general editor of the compendious Comprehensive Inorganic Chemistry (1973). He was knighted in 1989. He was survived by his wife Danusia and two sons, a daughter having predeceased him.

 

John Carson

28 February 1927 – 5 November 2016

The actor John Derek Carson-Parker (John Carson) died on 5 November 2016, aged 89. Born in Ceylon, where his father worked on rubber and tea plantations, he was educated in Australia and, after national service in an anti-aircraft regiment, the Queen's College, Oxford, where he acted, and read jurisprudence. On graduation in 1950 he moved to New Zealand, where he found work as an actor, before returning to the UK, where from the 1950s through to the 1980s he was in great demand for character parts in television and on stage, and later for television advertisements; he was particularly adept at playing villains, and starred in a large number of Hammer horrors. In 1983 he moved to South Africa, here he and his wife, Luanshya Greer, were put under surveillance for their opposition to apartheid; he later divided his time between South Africa and Britain, making a final appearance in Midsomer Murders in 2013. He was survived by his wife Luanshya, their two children, and four children of an earlier marriage.

Giles Waterfield

24 July 1949 – 5 November 2016

Giles Adrian Waterfield FSA, FRHistS, director of the Dulwich Picture Gallery from 1979 to 1996, died on 5 November 2016, aged 67. Born in Surrey, the son of a scientific civil servant, he was educated at Eton College and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read English, followed by an MA at the Courtauld Institute, where he first began to specialise in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century English art and architecture. He was education officer at the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, before taking over as director of the Dulwich Picture Gallery, which he transformed from a near-moribund institution into a thriving centre for the arts. He was actively involved in numerous heritage and artistic bodies, edited or wrote more than a dozen books (including an acclaimed history of art museums and exhibitions in Britain from 1800 to 1914, and four novels). He was survived by his partner, Joseph Whoriskey.

Ted Wilson

18 March 1938 – 3 November 2016

Edmund (Ted) Wilson, particle physicist, died on 3 November 2016, aged 78. Born in Liverpool, the son of a teacher and a nurse, he was educated at the Liverpool Institute High School for Boys and University College, Oxford, where he read physics, graduating in 1959. He spent the whole of his career with the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (Cern) in Switzerland, including twelve years as head of the Cern Accelerator School. He wrote two books, An Introduction to Particle Accelerators (2001) and Engines of Discovery (2007, with Andrew Sessler). In retirement he was a visiting professor at the John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science in Oxford. He was survived by his wife, Monika, and their three sons.

 

Alex Hamilton

5 November 1930 – 2 November 2016

Austin John Whiteside (Alex Hamilton), novelist and travel writer, died on 2 November 2016, aged 85. Brought up in Brazil, the son of a manager for Cable & Wireless, he completed his education at Clifton College, Bristol, and the Queen's College, Oxford, where he read English, and graduated in 1953, having taken his finals in the Warneford Hospital. On recovering, he changed his name and took a variety of jobs while establishing himself as a novelist and short story writer (known especially for his thrillers and horror stories) and as a literary journalist, particularly noted for his in-depth interviews with leading writers. In 1982 he joined the Guardian as its travel editor; he remained there for fifteen years, and was twice named Travel Writer of the Year. He was survived by his wife Stephanie, a former children's books editor of the Guardian, and their two sons. 

Ted Wilson

18 March 1938 – 3 November 2016

Edmund (Ted) Wilson, particle physicist, died on 3 November 2016, aged 78. Born in Liverpool, the son of a teacher and a nurse, he was educated at the Liverpool Institute High School for Boys and University College, Oxford, where he read physics, graduating in 1959. He spent the whole of his career with the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (Cern) in Switzerland, including twelve years as head of the Cern Accelerator School. He wrote two books, An Introduction to Particle Accelerators (2001) and Engines of Discovery (2007, with Andrew Sessler). In retirement he was a visiting professor at the John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science in Oxford. He was survived by his wife, Monika, and their three sons.

 

Branse Burbridge

4 February 1921 – 1 November 2016

Wing Commander Bransome Arthur (Branse) Burbridge DFC, DSO, fighter pilot and Christian outreach worker, died on 1 November 2016, aged 95. The son of a Wesleyan minister, he was educated at Alleyne's Grammar School, Stevenage. On the outbreak of the Second World War he initially registered as a conscientious objector but in September 1940 he joined the RAF in which he became celebrated as the force's most successful night fighter pilot, credited with 21 confirmed 'kills'. He was awarded a DFC and bar, a DSO and bar, and an American DFC. After the war he enrolled at St Peter's Hall, reading modern history and graduating in 1948, in which year he joined the staff of the Scripture Union, with particular responsibility for the Inter-School Christian Fellowship, which thrived under his direction. His wife Barbara (whom he married in 1949) died in 2012, and he was survived by their two children.

Eric Christiansen

15 September 1937 – 31 October 2016

Eric Christiansen, historian and fellow of New College, Oxford, died on 31 October 2016, aged 79. Brought up in Essex, the son of prosperous fruit farmers of Danish descent, he was educated at Charterhouse and, after national service, New College, Oxford, where he read modern history, graduating in 1961. He stayed on to write a thesis under the supervision of Raymond Carr, on 'The place of the army in Spanish politics, 1830-1854'. Awarded his DPhil in 1964, the following year he was elected a fellow of New College, where he remained until his retirement, and where he became a well-known, always elegant, character. Latterly his historical research and writing focused on medieval Scandinavia and the Baltic, and he translated many Viking and Norman texts. Late in life he married Sukey Chamberlain, who survived him, with his stepchildren.

 

Joe Smith

9 February 1931 – 28 October 2016 

Joseph Colin (Joe) Smith OBE, urological surgeon and fellow of St Cross College, Oxford, died on 28 October 2016, aged 85. Born in Lancaster, where his parents ran a grocer's shop, he was educated at Bootham School in York, then qualified in medicine at University College Hospital, London, in 1954; his studied were interrupted by a bout of tuberculosis. After a spell as house physician at the Miller General Hospital he returned to University College Hospital then moved to St Bartholomew's, and was part of the team that operated on Harold Macmillan in 1963. (Ironically, he was usually in favour of resorting to surgery only when necessary.) Following his move to Oxford as a consultant in 1966 he and Griff Fellows set up the university's world renowned department of urology in 1974, which Smith headed until his retirement in 2001. He was president of the Medical Defence Union from 1997 to 2001. He was survived by a son and a daughter, his wife Mafalda and another daughter having predeceased him.

Anthony Bryer

31 October 1927 – 22 October 2016

Anthony Applemore Mornington Bryer OBE, Byzantologist, died on 22 October 2016. Born in Portsmouth, the son of an RAF officer and a journalist who later worked for the Special Operations Executive, he was educated at Canford School, the Sorbonne, and Balliol College, Oxford, where he fell under the spell of Sir Dimitri Obolensky and stayed on to take his DPhil in 1967 for a thesis on medieval Trebizond. In 1964 he took up a post at Birmingham University as a research fellow, becoming a lecturer in 1965, senior lecturer in 1973, reader in 1976, and professor in 1980. He was director of the university’s Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies from 1976 to 1994, was closely involved in the professional organisations of Byzantologists, and for thirty years was a frequent lecturer on Hellenic Cruises. Though his writings ranged widely he was especially known for his work on Trebizond. He was survived by his second wife, Jenny, and the three daughters of his first marriage, to Elizabeth, who predeceased him.

Richard Cavendish

12 August 1930 – 21 October 2016

The author Richard Cavendish died on 21 October 2016, aged 86. Born in Henley-on-Thames, the son of an Anglican clergyman, he was educated at Christ's Hospital and, after national service in the education corps, Brasenose College, Oxford, where he read modern history, graduating in 1953. He worked in insurance in the City and lived for a while in New York and California before returning to Britain in the early 1960s and establishing himself as a writer, particularly on magic and witchcraft, scoring particular successes with The Black Arts (1967) and A History of Magic (1977). Later he wrote more general interest books, including gazetteers and guide books. He was survived by his daughter, Baroness Cavendish of Little Venice (former head of the Downing Street policy unit), his marriage to Jean Hay (whom he had met at Oxford) having ended in 1987.

Benedict Read

27 March 1945 – 20 October 2016

Benedict William Read, art historian, died on 20 October 2016, aged 71. Born in Beaconsfield but brought up in north Yorkshire, the son of the poet and art critic Sir Herbert Read (and brother of the author Piers Paul Read), he was educated at Ampleforth College and the Queen's College, Oxford, where he read English, followed by further study at the Courtauld Institute. He worked in the Courtauld's photographic library until 1990, when he became the first holder of a senior lectureship in sculpture studies at the University of Leeds. Although he published also on twentieth-century sculpture (and was involved in a wide range of societies concerned with art history) he was best known for his book on Victorian Sculpture (1982). He gave his last lecture (on Thomas Woolner's bust of John Fowler) five weeks before he died. He was unmarried.

Norman Murphy

20 May 1933 – 18 October 2016

Lt-Col Norman Thomas Philip Murphy, army officer and P.G. Wodehouse scholar, died on 18 October 2016, aged 83. Born in Croydon, the son of an Irish doctor, he was educated at Wimbledon College and, after national service in Egypt with the Green Howards, University College, Oxford, where he read jurisprudence. After graduating he worked briefly as a schoolteacher and a typewriter salesman before taking a regular commission in the Ordnance Corps, and going on to hold various senior posts in Nato and the Ministry of Defence. He began researching P.G. Wodehouse in the early 1970s, while based in Whitehall, and became an authority on the man and his books, publishing several definitive studies, including the two-volume Wodehouse Handbook (2006). He was survived by his wife, Elin Woodger, president of the American Wodehouse Society, and by a son from his first marriage (his first wife having predeceased him).

 

Stephen Moorbath

9 May 1929 – 16 October 2016

Stephen Erwin Moorbath FRS, geologist and fellow of Linacre College, Oxford, died on 16 October 2016, aged 87. Born in Magdeburg, Germany, the son of a Jewish doctor who had been awarded the Iron Cross in the First World War, he was forced to leave Germany with his father in 1939 (his mother was unable to escape before the war, and died in a concentration camp). He finished his schooling at City of Oxford High School for Boys then, after a period as a lab technician at Oxford then Harwell, Lincoln College, Oxford, where he read chemistry, graduating in 1954 and taking his DPhil in 1959. In 1956, as a research officer at the university, he set up the Geological Age and Isotope Research Group; he became a senior research officer in 1962, a reader in geology in 1978, and professor of isotope geology in 1992; he was a fellow of Linacre College from 1970. He was credited with dating the oldest rocks yet known on earth (in Greenland, dating back some 3,800 million years). He was elected an FRS in 1977. He was survived by his wife Pauline and their two children.

 

Colin George

20 September 1929 – 15 October 2016

Colin George, actor and theatre director, died on 15 October 2016, aged 87. Born in Pembroke Dock, the son of a Congregational minister, he was educated at Caterham School in Surrey and, after national service, University College, Oxford, where he read English, and was closely involved in the Oxford University Dramatic Society. On graduating in 1952 he, with Peter Hall, John Barton and others, formed the Oxford and Cambridge Players, later the Elizabethan Theatre Company. He joined Birmingham Rep before becoming associate director at Nottingham Playhouse then from 1965 to 1974 artistic director of Sheffield Playhouse, overseeing its highly successful move to the Crucible in 1971 (and insisting on its thrust stage). After long spells with the State Theatre Company of South Australia and the Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts he returned to England, joining the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1994 and playing Desdemona's aged father in the Crucible's fortieth anniversary production of Othello in 2011. He was survived by his wife, Sue, and the four children of his first marriage.

Oliver Montgomery 

22 July 1922 – 12 October 2016

Capt Oliver Linton Montgomery MC, army officer and colonial official, died on 12 October 2016, aged 94. Born in London, the son of a cavalry officer, he was educated at Harrow School before enlisting in the King's Royal Rifle Corps. He served in Italy (where he was awarded his MC), France and, after the war, Palestine, before being demobilised (against his will) in 1947. He then took up a place at Oriel College, Oxford, to read philosophy, politics and economics, but he left in 1949 without finishing his degree in order to re-join the King's Royal Rifle Corps. He was deeply affected by being one of the first to discover the scene of a massacre of Kikuyu villagers by Mau Mau militants, and in 1954 he left the army and his family, to join the Colonial Office, working in east Africa. After independence he held clerical jobs in banks and post office branches in Britain and Australia. He was survived by his three children, with whom he had been reunited in 2013.

Graham C. Greene 

10 July 1936 – 10 October 2016

Graham Carleton Greene CBE, publisher, died on 10 October 2016, aged 80. Born in Berlin, the son of Hugh Carleton Greene (later director-general of the BBC) and a nephew of the novelist Graham Greene, he was educated at Eton College and University College, Oxford, where he read modern history, graduating in 1957. After a short spell in merchant banking he joined Secker & Warburg Ltd in 1959, moving to Jonathan Cape in 1962 and becoming managing director from 1966 until shortly after its takeover by Random House in 1987. He secured the diaries of Richard Crossman for the firm, and among other writers he published were Anthony Burgess, Julian Barnes and Ian McEwan. Active in numerous public service roles, he was chairman of the trustees of the British Museum from 1996 to 2002, overseeing the fundraising for the Great Court project. He was survived by a son from his second marriage.

Sir Anthony Grant

29 May 1925 – 9 October 2016

The politician Sir Anthony Grant died on 9 October 2016, aged 91. Born in Surbiton, the son of a physicist, he was educated at St Pauls' School before spending five years (1943-8) in the Third Dragoon Guards, seeing service in the Far East and rising to the rank of captain. On demobilisation he went to Brasenose College, Oxford, where he read jurisprudence. He was admitted a solicitor in 1952. Conservative MP for Harrow Central then Cambridgeshire South-West from 1964 to 1997, he was an opposition whip from 1966 to 1970, a junior minister at the Board of Trade and the Department of Trade and Industry from 1970 to 1974, and a vice-chairman of the Conservative Party from 1974 to 1976, but failed to prosper under Margaret Thatcher. He was knighted in 1983. He was survived by his two children, his wife Sonia having predeceased him.

Stephen de Mowbray

15 August 1925 – 4 October 2016

Stephen de Mowbray, intelligence officer, died on 4 October 2016, aged 91. Born in Lymington, the son of a surgeon, he was educated at Winchester College and, after war service in the Fleet Air Arm (alongside Laurence Olivier), New College, Oxford, where he read philosophy, politics and economics, graduating in 1949. The following year, partly on Isaiah Berlin's advice, he joined the Secret Intelligence Service (MI6), serving in (amongst other places) Baghdad, Montevideo, and Washington, as well as in economic intelligence and counter-espionage. He was involved with Peter Wright and Arthur Martin in the search for a 'mole' at the top of MI5, and was convinced that it was Sir Roger Hollis. He resigned in 1979, frustrated at the unwillingness to take the allegations against Hollis seriously. In retirement (in the US, Africa, and finally Lymington again) he wrote or ghost-wrote a number of books. He was survived by his wife Patricia, their two children, and the four children of his first marriage.

C S L Davies

25 September 1936 – 29 September 2016

The historian Clifford Stephen Lloyd (Cliff) Davies died on 29 September 2016, aged 80. Born in Hammersmith, into a Welsh-speaking family who ran Davies’s Dairy, he won a scholarship to St Paul’s School, followed by two years’ national service with the army in a clerical position. He first arrived at Wadham College, Oxford, as an undergraduate in 1956, reading modern history. He stayed on to take his DPhil in 1963 for a thesis on sixteenth-century military organisation. A very brief spell (1962–3) at the University of Glasgow intervened before he became a fellow of Wadham, where he remained until and after his retirement in 2001. He was keeper of the archives from 1963 to 2016, among many other college posts. He wrote only one book, Peace, Print and Protestantism (1976), but his articles and sometimes excoriating reviews ranged widely across the history of England and its immediate neighbours from around 1400 to around 1700. He was survived by his wife Kathleen, née Carpenter (whom he had met when she was a student at St Anne’s) and their two children.

Lord Murray

15 June 1922 – 27 September 2016

Ronald King Murray, Lord Murray PC, politician and judge, died on 27 September 2016, aged 94. the son of an electrical engineer, he was educated at George Watson's College, Edinburgh, and, following war service in the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers in India and south-east Asia, Edinburgh University and Jesus College, Oxford. He was called to the Scottish bar in 1953 and became a QC in 1967. He was Labour MP for Leith from 1970 to 1979 and Lord Advocate from 1974 to 1979; he retired at the 1979 election to become a Senator of the College of Justice until 1995. He was made an honorary fellow of Jesus College in 1999. In retirement he was a doughty campaigner against Trident. He was survived by his two children, his wife Sheila having predeceased him.

Sir Julian Paget

11 July 1921 – 25 September 2016

Lt-Col Sir Julian Tolver Paget CVO, fourth baronet, army officer and military historian, died on 25 September 2016, aged 95. Born in London, the son of General Sir Bernard Paget (and great-grandson of the first baronet: he inherited the title on the death of his uncle in 1972), he was educated at Radley College, and Christ Church, Oxford, where his studies in medicine were interrupted by the Second World War. He joined the Coldstream Guards in 1940, serving in north-west Europe in 1944-5, and deciding to stay on in the army after the war. He eventually retired as a lieutenant-colonel in 1968. He was a gentleman usher to the Queen from 1971 to 1991. The author of number of works of military history, including several on counter-insurgency campaigns, and a biography of his father (2008), he was editor of the Guards Magazine from 1976 to 1993. He was survived by his two children, his wife Diana having predeceased him.

Sir George Engle

13 September 1926 – 14 September 2016

Sir George Lawrence Jose Engle KCB, QC, parliamentary counsel, died on 14 September 2016, aged 90. He was educated at Charterhouse and, after national service in the Royal Artillery, Christ Church, Oxford, where he read literae humaniores, graduating in 1951. He was called to the bar by Lincoln's Inn in 1953, and joined the parliamentary counsel's office in 1957. He was seconded to Nigeria to help draft legislation from 1965 to 1967, and to the Law Commission from 1971 to 1973 before becoming second parliamentary counsel in 1980 and first parliamentary counsel from 1981 to 1986. He was president of the Commonwealth Association of Parliamentary Counsel, which he helped form, from 1983 to 1986, and of the Kipling Society from 2001 to 2008. He was knighted KCB in 1983. He was survived by his wife Irene and their three daughters.

Luke Herrmann

9 March 1932 – 9 September 2016

Lutz Johann Wolfgang Maximilian (Luke) Herrmann, art historian, died on 9 September 2016, aged 84. Born in Berlin, the son of an architect, he emigrated to Britain with his part-Jewish family in 1937. He was educated at Westminster School and, after national service in the Royal Artillery, New College, Oxford, where he read modern history, graduating in 1955, and was president of the university art club. He spent ten years as art editor of theIllustrated London News before joining the staff of the University of Leicester, where he became head of the history of art department and a professor in 1973. He took early retirement in 1987 in order to concentrate on his writing. He wrote on a wide variety of art historical topics, but was best known for his work on Turner, and in particular his groundbreakingTurner Prints (1990). He was survived by his wife, the archaeologist Georgina Herrmann, and their two sons.

David Jenkins

26 January 1925 – 4 September 2016

The Rt Rev David Edward Jenkins, Bishop of Durham from 1984 to 1994, died on 4 September 2016, aged 91. The son of bank worker, he was educated at St Dunstan's College, Catford, then, following service in the Royal Artillery (in which he rose to the rank of captain), the Queen's College, Oxford, where he took degrees in literae humaniores in 1951 and theology in 1952. He trained for the priesthood at Lincoln Theological College, and after one year as a lecturer at the Queen's College, Birmingham, he returned to its namesake in Oxford as fellow, chaplain and praelector in theology, from 1954 to 1969. He was director of Humanum Studies for the World Council of Churches in Geneva (1969-73) and of the William Temple Foundation, Manchester (1973-8), then professor of theology at the University of Leeds (1979-84) before becoming Bishop of Durham. After retiring from the latter post he was an assistant bishop in the diocese of Ripon and Leeds until 2014. A leading theologian, he was known for his socialist convictions, and his sceptical view of such conventional tenets of Christianity as the virgin birth and the resurrection of Christ. He was survived by his four children, his wife Mollie (whom he had married in 1949, while still a student) having predeceased him.

Frans ten Bos

21 April 1937 – 1 September 2016 

Frans ten Bos, rugby player and businessman, died on 1 September 2016, aged 79. Born in Richmond, Surrey, the son of a Dutch pilot, he spent the first two years of his life in the Netherlands, but his parents returned to Britain when the Nazis invaded their home country in 1940. He was brought up in Fife, and was educated at Fettes College and, after national service in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, St Edmund Hall, Oxford, where he read geography, played rugby for the university, and graduated in 1961. A lock forward, he played in the second row for Scotland on seventeen occasions between 1959 and 1963; he also played for London Scottish, but turned down the opportunity to play for the British Lions and largely retired from the game in the mid-1960s in order to concentrate on his business career as owner of a large printing business and later chairman of Henderson Strata Investments. He was survived by his wife Teresa and by the three daughters of his first marriage.

Miles Vaughan Williams

8 August 1918 – 31 August 2016

Miles Vaughan Williams, pharmacologist and fellow of Hertford College, Oxford, died on 31 August 2016, aged 98. Born in Bangalore, the son of a railway engineer (and a cousin of the composer), he was educated at Wellington School, Somerset, and Wadham College, Oxford, where he initially read Greats and took classical moderations; but in 1939 as a conscientious objector he helped form the Universities Ambulance Service, later joining the British Volunteer Ambulance Service. In 1942 he returned to Wadham, having switched to medicine, and qualified in 1947. Specialising in pharmacology, he took a BSc then continued clinical work in Oxford before becoming a fellow of Hertford College in 1955. There he was a driving force behind the modernisation of Hertford’s accommodation, and created the Vaughan Williams Fund, offering travel awards to Hertford medical students. He published more than 200 papers, and was particularly known for his work on arrhythmia. He was survived by his wife Marie and their three children.
 

Palmer Newbould

23 April 1929 – 29 August 2016

Palmer Newbould OBE, botanist, died on 29 August 2016, aged 87. Born in London, the son of the Liberal MP Alfred Newbould, he was educated at Charterhouse School and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read botany, graduating in 1950 and winning the Christopher Welch scholarship the same year. He took his PhD at University College, London, where he became a lecturer in plant ecology in 1955. In 1968 he moved to the New University of Ulster as first professor of biology; and following the merger with Ulster Polytechnic he became the first provost of the University of Ulster's Coleraine campus. He was deeply involved in nature conservation in Northern Ireland, including as chairman of the province's Council for Nature Conservation and the Countryside. He was survived by his wife and fellow botanist Jo, and their three children.

Sir Ronald Arculus

11 February 1923 – 28 August 2016

Sir Ronald Arculus KCMG, KCVO, diplomat, died on 28 August 2016, aged 93. Born in Birmingham, he was educated at Solihull School. He took the war-shortened course in French at Exeter College, Oxford, then from 1942 to 1945 served with the 4th Queen’s Own Hussars in the Middle East and Italy. He returned briefly to Oxford, where he won the Heath Harrison Scholarship in Italian in 1947, but in the latter year he joined the Diplomatic Service. Postings in San Francisco, La Paz, Ankara, Washington, New York and Paris culminated in his appointment as ambassador to Italy, from 1979 to 1983. He was knighted KCMG in 1979 and made a KCVO during the Queen’s state visit to Italy in 1980. In retirement he was chairman of the Kensington Society. He was survived by his two children, his wife Sheila having predeceased him.

George Spencer-Brown

2 April 1923 – 25 August 2016

George Spencer-Brown, philosopher and mathematician, died on 25 August 2016, aged 93. Born in Grimsby, the son of an engineer, he was educated at Mill Hill School and London Hospital Medical College. However, his medical studies were cut short by war service with the Royal Navy. On demobilisation he went to Trinity College, Cambridge, where he read philosophy and psychology. From 1952 to 1958 he taught philosophy at Christ Church, Oxford. After a spell in industry he taught mathematics at the University of London; later he held positions at Cambridge, the University of Maryland, the University of Western Australia, and Stanford University. He was best known for his book Laws of Form (1969), which divided opinion but became a cult classic. He was separated from his wife, Katherine.

Barry Myers

1 June 1937 – 17 August 2016

Barry Zenith Myers, advertising film director, died on 17 August 2016, aged 79. Born in London, the son of an amusement park owner, he was educated at King's College School, Wimbledon, and Brasenose College, where he read modern languages, graduating in French and German in 1959. After a spell as an account executive with Graham and Gillies he worked as a copywriter for Foote, Cone & Belding, Lintas, and Bensons, then moved into film-making with Burrows and Gillard, setting up on his own account as Myers and Associates then Spots, which he founded in 1972. He directed some of the most memorable advertisements of the 1970s and 1980s, including those for Cadbury's Flake and Milk Tray, Radio Rentals, Smirnoff, and British Airways. He was survived by his wife Victoria and their three children.

Alison Kelly

17 October 1913 – 15 August 2016

Alison Kelly, art historian, died on 15 August 2016, aged 102. Born in Liverpool, the only child of the surgeon Sir Robert Kelly, she was educated at Manor House School in Limpsfield, Surrey, and Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, where she read English, graduating in 1936. She went on to Liverpool City School of Art and worked in stage design before being recruited to the camouflage unit at Leamington Spa during the Second World War. After the war she taught art history at the City Literary Institute and for the University of London’s extramural department; wrote, particularly on ceramics, for the Burlington Magazine, Apollo, Country Life, and other publications; and in 1990 published an acclaimed book on Mrs Coade’s Stone (an artificial stone widely used in the late eighteenth century) and the remarkable lives of Eleanor Coade and her daughter (also Eleanor), the first two proprietors of the Coade factory. She was elected a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries. She never married but was devoted to her godchildren.

Neil Black

28 May 1932 – 14 August 2016

The oboist Neil Cathcart Black OBE died on 14 August 2016, aged 84. Born in Birmingham, the son of a consultant radiologist, he was educated at Rugby School and Exeter College, Oxford, where he read modern history, graduating in 1956. He had been an early member of the National Youth Orchestra, and on leaving Oxford he embarked on a career as a professional musician. He was principal oboist of the London Symphony Orchestra from 1959 to 1961 and continued to work with leading orchestras, though usually as a soloist, but he was principally known for his work with chamber orchestras including the Academy of St Martin-in-the-Fields, the London Mozart Players, and the English Chamber Orchestra, of which he was principal oboist from 1970 to 1998. He was featured on a large number of recordings. He was survived by his wife Janice, also an oboist, and by the three children of his first marriage. 

Lord Goff of Chieveley

12 November 1926 – 14 August 2016

Robert Lionel Archibald Goff, Baron Goff of Chieveley PC, FBA, law lord, died on 14 August 2016, aged 89. The son of an army officer, he was educated at Eton College and, after national service in the Scots Guards, mainly in Italy, New College, Oxford, where he read jurisprudence, graduating in 1950. He was a fellow and tutor in law at Lincoln College from 1951 (the year he was called to the bar by the Inner Temple) until 1955, but thereafter practised as a barrister, specialising in commercial law, and taking silk in 1967. He was a judge of the High Court (Queen's Bench Division) from 1975 to 1982, a Lord Justice of Appeal from 1982 to 1986, Lord of Appeal in Ordinary from 1986 to 1998, and Senior Law Lord for the last two of those years. Knighted in 1975, as a law lord he took his territorial designation from the village in Berkshire where he lived. The co-author with Gareth Jones [see below] of a seminal work on the Law of Restitution (1966) and of many influential articles, he was elected an FBA in 1987. He was survived by his wife Sarah, née Cousins (a history graduate of St Anne's College) and three children, one son having died in infancy.

Sir Swinton Thomas

12 January 1931 – 12 August 2016

Sir Swinton Barclay Thomas PC, Court of Appeal judge, died on 12 August 2016, aged 85. Born in Glasgow, the son of an army officer, he was educated at Ampleforth College and, after national service with the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles), Lincoln College, Oxford, where he read jurisprudence, graduating in 1954. He was called to the bar by the Inner Temple in 1955 and took silk in 1975, the year in which he became a recorder of the Crown Court. He was a judge of the High Court of Justice, Family Division (1985-90) and Queen's Bench Division (1990-4) before becoming a Lord Justice of Appeal in 1994, retiring in 2000. He was knighted in 1985 and made a privy counsellor in 1994. A leading Catholic layman, he was vice-chairman of the Archbishop of Westminster's Review on Child Protection in 2000-1, which led to the establishment of the Catholic Office for the Protection of Children and Vulnerable Adults. He was also commissioner for the Interception of Communications (2000-6). He was survived by his wife Angela, Lady Cope, and their two children.

Robin Collier

7 June 1923 – 7 August 2016

Major Robin Cameron Herne Collier MC, army officer, died on 7 August 2016, aged 93. The son of a major-general, he was born at Farnborough and educated at Stowe School and, briefly, Christ Church, Oxford, but left in 1942 to join the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. He was wounded at Monte Cassino but after recovering rejoined his regiment and was awarded an MC in 1944 for his bravery under fire in the capture of a high ridge overlooking the River Arno. He remained in the army after the war, serving in Greece, Austria, Italy, the Canal Zone, Korea, Nigeria, and Singapore, before retiring in 1967. He then moved to New Zealand, where he was an apple farmer near Nelson. He was survived by his wife Jill and their three children. 

Alex Danchev

26 August 1955 – 7 August 2016 

The historian and biographer Alex Danchev died on 7 August 2016, aged 60. Born in Bolton, the son of a mining engineer of part-Belgian and part-Bulgarian descent, he read modern history and economics at University College, Oxford, graduating in 1977. After taking a postgraduate teacher training course at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, he went to Sandhurst, from where he was commissioned into the Royal Army Education Corps, meanwhile taking a PhD at King's College, London. He subsequently taught at Keele University, from 1992 as a professor, before moving in 2004 to Nottingham University and then in 2014 to the University of St Andrews. He was a visiting fellow at St Antony's College, Oxford, from 2008 to 2010. He was initially known as a political and military historian, publishing biographies of Oliver Franks (1993) and Basil Liddell Hart (1998), and co-editing the war diaries of Lord Alanbrooke (2001). Latterly he turned to art history, with studies of Georges Braque (2005) and Paul Cézanne (2012). He was survived by his wife Dee, a psychologist, and two step-daughters.

Kenneth Durham

23 October 1953 – 6 August 2016

Kenneth John Durham, headmaster, died on 6 August 2016, aged 62. Brought up in Kingston upon Thames, he was educated at St John’s School, Leatherhead, and Brasenose College, Oxford, where he read philosophy, politics and economics, and was a keen actor. He taught economics at St Alban’s School and King’s College School, Wimbledon (where he was also director of studies), before becoming headmaster of University College School, from 1996 to 2013. There he was noted for his dynamism and trenchant views; the introduction of co-education in the sixth form; and the acquisition of a pre-preparatory school. He was chairman of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Association in 2011-2. He was survived by his wife Vivienne, headmistress of Francis Holland School.

Sir Len Peach

17 December 1932 – 5 August 2016

Sir Leonard Harry (Len) Peach, businessman, died on 5 August 2016, aged 83. He was educated at Queen Mary's Grammar School, Walsall, and, after national service in the infantry, Pembroke College, Oxford, where he read modern history, graduating in 1956. After a short spell as literary assistant to Randolph Churchill he joined the Wolverhampton engineering firm John Thompson. He moved to IBM in 1962, becoming director of personnel in 1971. From 1983 to 1985 he was president of the Institute of Personnel Management. Seconded to the DHSS in 1985, he became chief executive of the NHS Management Board from 1986 to 1989, and chairman of the NHS Training Authority from 1986 to 1991 and of Skillbase Ltd from 1990 to 1994. He held a large number of other business and public service posts, including as a Civil Service Commissioner from 1995 to 2000. He was knighted in 1989 and made an honorary fellow of Pembroke College in 1996. He was survived by his wife Doreen and their two sons.

Gerard Noel

20 November 1926 – 27 July 2016

The Hon Gerard Eyre Wriothesley Noel FRSL, journalist and author, died on 27 July 2016, aged 89. The second son of the fourth Earl of Gainsborough, who served as privy chamberlain to two popes, he was educated in Georgetown, near Washington DC, and Exeter College, Oxford, where he read modern history and graduated in 1947. After several career changes (which included spells training for the priesthood at the English College in Rome and being called to the bar by the Inner Temple in 1952) he settled on journalism, becoming literary editor (1958-61), assistant editor (1968-71), editor (1971-6 and 1982-4) and editorial director (1976-81 and 1984-2014) of the Catholic Herald. He wrote a large number of books, including biographies, whose subjects ranged from Senator Barry Goldwater (1964) to the Duke of Norfolk (2004), contributions to Catholic history (he was a particular authority on Renaissance popes), and a history of the Inner Temple (2002). He was survived by his wife Adele and their three children.

Sir David Goodall

9 October 1931 – 22 July 2016

Sir (Arthur) David Saunders Goodall GCMG, diplomat, died on 22 July 2016, aged 84. Brought up in Yorkshire, he was educated at Ampleforth College and Trinity College, where he read literae humaniores, graduating in 1954. After national service in the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry he joined the Foreign Service in 1956. He served in Nicosia, Jakarta, Nairobi, Vienna and Bonn before being seconded to the Cabinet Office in 1982 and then made a deputy under-secretary of state at the FCO. In these posts he played a key role in the negotiation of the Anglo-Irish Agreement of 1985. His final post was as high commissioner to India, from 1987 to 1991. In retirement he was co-chairman of Anglo-Irish Encounter, chairman of the British-Irish Association, the Leonard Cheshire Foundation, and the governing body of Heythrop College, London, and a visiting professor at the Institute of Irish Studies, University of Liverpool. He was knighted KCMG in 1987 and promoted GCMG in 1991. He was survived by his wife Morwenna and their three children.

Rt Rev John Garton

3 October 1941 – 21 July 2016

The Rt Rev John Henry Garton, Anglican bishop, died on 21 July 2016, aged 74. He initially sought a career in the army, and attended the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst. Following his commissioning in the Royal Tank Regiment he was sent to Worcester College, Oxford, where he read psychology, philosophy and physiology, graduating in 1966. While at Oxford he determined to change course and become a Church of England priest; after some wrangling he was allowed to proceed to Cuddesdon College and complete his commission as a chaplain to the forces. In 1973 he became a lecturer at Lincoln Theological College, in 1978 rector of Coventry East Team Ministry, in 1986 principal of Ripon College, Cuddesdon, and from 1996 to 2005 Bishop of Plymouth. In retirement he lived in Oxford, and was an honorary assistant bishop in the diocese of Oxford. He was survived by two sons, his wife Pauline having predeceased him.

Antony Copley

1 July 1937 – 18 July 2016

Antony Copley, historian, died on 18 July 2016, aged 79. Born in Hertfordshire, he was educated at Gresham's School and, after national service in the navy, Worcester College, Oxford, where he read modern history, graduating in 1960. He went on to take a BPhil from St Antony's College in 1963, the year he gained a post as lecturer in history at the University College of North Wales, Bangor. In 1967 he moved to the new University of Kent at Canterbury, where he remained until his retirement in 2002, latterly as a professor. He wrote primarily on Indian political and religious history, and on nineteenth-century France, but (a keen churchgoer, interested in Theosophism and monasticism) also on the relationship between music and spirituality, and between Western writers such as E.M. Forster and Christopher Isherwood and Hinduism. In 2016 he published his memoirs, which among other things revealed his experience of being convicted of gross indecency as an undergraduate after being entrapped by police.

Ian Graham-Orlebar

9 August 1926 – 18 July 2016

The Reverend Ian Henry Gaunt Graham-Orlebar, solicitor and clergyman, died on 18 July 2016, aged 89. He was educated at Winchester College and New College, Oxford, where he read jurisprudence. After graduating he qualified and for ten years practised as a solicitor in London; his youth work at St Stephen, Westminster, led to his change of direction, and he was ordained in 1962 after training at Cuddeson College. For eight years he was curate of St Mary, Hemel Hempstead, and from 1970 to 1992 he was rector of Barton-le-Clay with Higham Gobion and Hexton, in Bedfordshire. He was noted both for renovating at his own expense the moated rectory and its extensive garden, which he opened to the public, and for visiting parishioners by horse. In retirement in Devon he created a second much-visited garden. He was unmarried.

Sir Geoffrey Hill

18 June 1932 – 30 June 2016

The poet Sir Geoffrey Hill died on 30 June 2016, aged 84. Born and brought up in Bromsgrove, the son of a police constable, he was educated at the County High School, Bromsgrove, and Keble College, Oxford, where he read English, graduating in 1953. Throughout his career he combined academia and poetry. He taught at the University of Leeds from 1954 to 1980, the last four years as professor of English literature; from 1981 to 1988 he was a university lecturer in English and fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and from 1988 onwards he was university professor and professor of literature and religion at Boston University, USA. His first collection, For the Unfallen (1959), which won the Gregory Award, was followed by King Log(1968), which won the Hawthornden Prize. Overall he published some twenty volumes of poetry, as well as a version of Henrik Ibsen's Brand (1978), and four volumes of literary criticism; his judgements tended to be pungent. He was Professor of Poetry at Oxford from 2010 to 2015, and received an honorary DLitt from the university in 2010. He was knighted in 2012. He was survived by his wife, Alice (an Anglican vicar and librettist), their daughter, and the four children of his first marriage.

Lord Mayhew of Twysden

11 September 1929 – 25 June 2016

The politician Patrick Barnabas Burke Mayhew, Baron Mayhew of Twysden PC, DL, died on 25 June 2016, aged 86. The son of an oil executive, he was educated at Tonbridge School and, after national service in the 4th/7th Royal Dragoon Guards, Balliol College, Oxford, where he read jurisprudence and became president of both the Oxford University Conservative Association and the Oxford Union. He graduated in 1953, was called to the bar by the Middle Temple in 1955, and took silk in 1972. He was MP for Tunbridge Wells from 1974 to 1997, and served as a junior minister at the Department of Employment and the Home Office before becoming Solicitor General in 1983, Attorney General in 1987, and Secretary of State for Northern Ireland from 1992 to 1997; in the latter post he helped devise the 1993 Downing Street Declaration and worked steadily to nurture the peace process; he was the first secretary of state to meet Gerry Adams, leader of Sinn Féin, in 1995. He was knighted in 1983 and made a life peer in 1997. He was survived by his wife Jean and their four sons.

Randolph Vigne

10 July 1928 – 19 June 2016

Randolph Vigne, anti-apartheid activist and author, died on 19 June 2016, aged 87. Born in Kimberley, South Africa, he was educated at St Andrew's College, Grahamstown, and at Wadham College, Oxford, where he read English, graduating in 1949. He became involved in the South African Liberal Party on his return to the country but, increasingly frustrated by the limitations of white liberal politics, he joined the Pan-Africanist Congress, and then helped found the National Committee for Liberation, which carried out small-scale acts of sabotage. With the police on his trail after finding papers incriminating him, he was spirited away on a Norwegian freighter by his friend James Currey, OUP's representative in Cape Town. Maurice Bowra supported his successful application for asylum in the UK, where he settled in a flat in Kensington, worked in publishing, and devoted his spare time to writing, mainly on South African and Huguenot history. He was survived by his wife Gillian and their two children.

John Baker

5 November 1925 – 13 June 2016

His Honour John Arnold Baker DL, circuit judge, died on 13 June 2016, aged 90. Born in Calcutta, the son of a jute merchant, he was educated at Hoe Grammar School, Plymouth College, and Wellington School, Somerset, then, following war service in the Royal Navy, Wadham College, Oxford, where he read jurisprudence, was treasurer of the Oxford Union, and graduated in 1947, staying on to take the BCL in 1948. He was admitted a solicitor in 1951 and called to the bar by Gray's Inn in 1960. He was chairman of the National League of Young Liberals in 1952-3 and of the Liberal Party Executive in 1969-70, and three times unsuccessfully contested seats for the party, but gave up politics on becoming a recorder in 1972. The following year he became a circuit judge, remaining one for the next twenty-five years. In retirement he was a trustee then patron of the Apex Trust, a charity helping ex-offenders. He was survived by his wife Joy and their two daughters.

Donald Carr

28 December 1926 – 12 June 2016 

The cricketer Donald Bryce Carr OBE died on 12 June 2016, aged 89. Born in Germany, the son of an army officer, he was educated at Repton School and, after service in the Royal Berkshire Regiment, Worcester College, Oxford, where he read modern history. A keen sportsman, he played cricket and hockey for the army, and cricket and soccer for Oxford (winning Blues in both sports), was captain of the Oxford cricket team, and a member of the Pegasus football teams which won the Amateur Cup Finals at Wembley in 1931 and 1953. He continued playing until 1963, making several appearances for England, including as captain in 1952, and was captain of Derbyshire from 1955 to 1962. In 1959 he became the first Derbyshire player to score more than 2,000 runs for the county in a season. He was assistant secretary of the MCC from 1962 to 1974 and secretary of the Cricket Council and the Test and County Cricket Board from 1974 to 1986. He was survived by his wife Stella and their two children.

Lord Leach of Fairford

1 June 1934 – 12 June 2016 

(Charles Guy) Rodney Leach, Baron Leach of Fairford, merchant banker and political activist, died on 12 June 2016, aged 82. Born in Dublin, he was educated at Harrow School and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read literae humaniores, won all four of the Latin and Greek verse and prose prizes, and graduated in 1956. After briefly pursuing an academic career, he moved into finance, working for Greenshields in Montreal, then N.M. Rothschild & Sons, the Trade Development Bank, and Matheson & Co. He became a director of Jardine Matheson Holdings in 1984 and deputy chairman of the Jardine Lloyd Thompson Group in 1997. He was an active political campaigner, as chairman of Business for Sterling, founder in 2005 of Open Europe, which campaigned for reform of the European Union, and a leading light in the 'No to AV' campaign in 2011. He was chairing an Open Europe meeting on the 2016 referendum when he suffered a severe stroke. He was survived by his wife Jessica (widow of the Times editor Charles Douglas-Home) and the five children of his first marriage.

Jerome Bruner

1 October 1915 – 5 June 2016

The psychologist and educationist Jerome Seymour Bruner died on 5 June 2016, aged 100. Born in New York, the son of a Polish watchmaker, he graduated in psychology from Duke University, North Carolina, in 1937, followed by a doctorate from Harvard in 1941. After war service in US intelligence he returned to Harvard, where he became a professor of psychology in 1952, and founding director of the Centre for Cognitive Studies in 1961. From 1972 to 1980 he was Watts professor of psychology and a fellow of Wolfson College, Oxford; in 2007 the building housing Oxford's Department of Education was named after him. Meanwhile he had returned to the US, where he taught at the New York School for Social Research, and then at New York University. He published widely and influentially on perception, personality, cognitive growth, and the making of culture, and as a philosopher of education he was best known for his contributions to the understanding of children's cognitive development and his advocacy of initiatives to engage underprivileged children. He was survived by his partner, Eleanor Fox, and by the two children of his first marriage.

Norman Longmate

15 December 1925 – 4 June 2016 

Norman Longmate, historian and BBC administrator, died on 4 June 2016, aged 90. Born in Newbury, the son of a photographer, he was educated at Christ's Hospital and, after war and postwar service in the Royal Army Service Corps, Worcester College, Oxford, where he read modern history, graduating in 1950. He stayed on for two years as a research student before taking a job with the Evening Standard. He subsequently worked for the Central Electricity Authority, then as a scriptwriter and producer for the BBC, before joining the BBC Secretariat, where he remained until 1983. He wrote, initially in his spare time, a very large number of works of popular social and military history, with a particular focus on the Second World War, and was perhaps best known for How We Lived Then (1971), a social history of the home front. His second book, Oxford Triumphant (1954), caused a stir for its depiction of sexual mores at the university. He was survived by his partner, Pam, and by a daughter from an earlier marriage. 

James Campbell

26 January 1935 – 31 May 2016

The Anglo-Saxon historian James Campbell FBA died on 31 May 2016, aged 81. Born in Cheltenham, he was raised in Suffolk by his grandparents and attended Lowestoft Grammar School and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read modern history and was taught by K.B. McFarlane, Karl Leyser, and A.J.P. Taylor. Graduating in 1955 and exempted from national service on account of his eyesight, he was a junior research fellow at Merton College until becoming a tutorial fellow of Worcester College in 1957, remaining there until and after his retirement in 2002; he was made a reader in 1990 and professor in 1996. He published several books, including, with Patrick Wormald and Eric John, The Anglo-Saxons (1982), and a large number of journal articles which contributed powerfully to a more positive reassessment of the Anglo-Saxons and their governments. He was elected an FBA in 1984. As a tutor he was notoriously eccentric and much loved. In 2006 he married a younger researcher, Bärbel Brodt, who predeceased him.

Pam Royds

17 August 1924 – 31 May 2016

Pamela Mary (Pam) Royds (née Maycock), children's book editor, died on 31 May 2016, aged 91. Born in London, the daughter of a businessman, she grew up in Surrey and was educated at Eothen School, Caterham, and St Hugh's College, Oxford, where she read English. On graduating in 1948 she went to work in Norwich. In 1952 she married Alex Royds, a journalist. It was only after having four children, and almost by accident, that she began working for the publishers Andre Deutsch in 1964 as children's book editor, initially just to cover the maternity leave of Philippa Pearce, but she remained there until the early 1980s, a few years after Scholastic bought the Andre Deutsch list. She was noted for her child-centred approach, and among the authors she nurtured was the poet Michael Rosen. She also pioneered diversity in children's books. She was survived by her husband and their four children.

Lord Neill of Bladen

8 August 1926 – 28 May 2016

(Francis) Patrick Neill, Baron Neill of Bladen QC, Warden of All Souls College from 1977 to 1995 and Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University from 1985 to 1989, died on 28 May 2016, aged 89. Born in London, the son of Sir Thomas Neill, a businessman, he was educated at Highgate School and, after service in the Rifle Brigade, Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read jurisprudence, graduating in 1950 and winning a prize fellowship at All Souls the same year. Called to the bar by Gray's Inn in 1951, he became a much sought after specialist in commercial and patent law. He was also actively engaged in public service; among many other positions he was chairman of the Press Council from 1978 to 1983, of the committee of inquiry into regulatory arrangements at Lloyd's in 1986-7, and of the later loss review committee at Lloyd's in 1991-2. As Warden of All Souls he instilled efficiency into the college's administration, and as Vice-Chancellor he launched the Campaign for Oxford, which under his leadership raised £350 million for the university. He was knighted in 1983 and made a life peer in 1997. He was survived by three sons and two daughters; one son predeceased him, as did his wife Caroline. 

Eddie O'Hara 

1 October 1937 – 28 May 2016

The politician Edward (Eddie) O'Hara died on 28 May 2016, aged 78. Born in Bootle, the son of a horsekeeper at Bootle docks, he was educated at Liverpool Collegiate School and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read literae humaniores, graduating in 1962. He taught at the Perse School, Cambridge, and Birkenhead School before moving into teacher training, initially at C.F. Mott College of Education, then at the City of Liverpool College of Higher Education, and finally at Liverpool Polytechnic, where he was head of curriculum studies. He succeeded his friend Sean Hughes as Labour MP for Knowsley South in 1990, retaining the seat until retiring at the 2010 election. He was perhaps best known as a campaigner for the return of the Elgin Marbles to Greece. He was survived by his second wife, Margaret, and the three children of his first marriage.

Henrietta Phipps 

9 December 1931 – 27 May 2016

Henrietta Phipps (née Lamb), landscape gardener, died on 27 May 2016, aged 84. Born in London, the daughter of the artist Henry Lamb and the writer Lady Pansy Pakenham, she was educated at the Godolphin School, Salisbury, and Somerville College, Oxford, where she read modern history and became a Roman Catholic. After graduating in 1953 she joined the staff of History Today, and in 1960 married the silversmith William Phipps (they met when her father painted his father, Sir Eric Phipps, who had been British ambassador in Berlin from 1933 to 1937). She later turned to landscape gardening, working primarily for Kensington and Chelsea Council; among her designs was the landscaping for Kensington New Pool. She was survived by her four children, her husband having predeceased her.

Anthony Bird 

2 March 1931 – 16 May 2016

The Rev Dr Anthony Peter Bird, Anglican priest and doctor, died on 16 May 2016, aged 85. Born in Wolverhampton, the son of a vicar, he was educated at St John's School, Leatherhead, and St John's College, Oxford, where he read literae humaniores, graduating in 1954, and staying on to take a second degree in theology in 1955. He trained for the priesthood at Cuddesdon College and served as curate of St Mary's, Stafford, before returning to Cuddesdon as chaplain then vice-principal. In 1964 he decided to re-train as a doctor, and read medicine at the University of Birmingham. He worked briefly as a GP in King's Norton before becoming principal of the Queen's College (an ecumenical theological college) in Birmingham. In 1979 he returned to medical practice, but remained an honorary lecturer in theology at Birmingham University for several more years, and served as an assistant parish priest of St Paul's, Balsall Heath. He was the author of two books, The Search for Health (1981) and The God Who Says Sorry (2010). He was survived by his second wife, Andrea, and by the three children of his first marriage.

David Rendel 

15 April 1949 – 16 May 2016

The politician David Digby Rendel died on 16 May 2016, aged 67. Born in Athens, the son of Alexander Rendel, a foreign correspondent for the Times, he was educated at Eton College and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read physics, followed by graduate work at St Cross College. He was a member of the university's winning boat race crew in 1974. He worked in computing and finance for Shell, British Gas, and Esso while becoming actively involved in politics, with the Liberal-SDP Alliance and its successor, the Liberal Democrats. In 1993 he sensationally overturned a solid Conservative majority of 12,000 in the Newbury by-election to win by more than 22,000 votes; he remained MP for Newbury with diminishing majorities until the 2005 election. In parliament he was Liberal Democrat spokesman on local government, then higher education. As a member of the party's federal executive committee, he voted against forming a coalition with the Conservatives in 2010. He was survived by his wife Susan, a doctor, and their three sons.

Denys Potts 

17 March 1923 – 11 May 2016

Denys Campion Potts, fellow and tutor in French at Keble College, Oxford, from 1952 to 1989, died on 11 May 2016, aged 93. Born in Manchester, the son of a vicar, he was educated at St John's School, Leatherhead, and Brasenose College, Oxford, where he took mathematical moderations in 1942. War service in the design office of Rolls Royce interrupted his education and on his return to Brasenose he switched to French, graduating in 1949, followed by doctoral work (later published as his first book) on the seventeenth-century Epicurean writer Charles de Saint-Evremond. Among other books he wrote, with Donald Charlton, French Thought Since 1600(1974). He also co-founded Oxford's Early Modern Research Seminar. He was survived by his wife Doraine, also a French scholar, and their four children.

Dennis Nineham 

27 September 1921 – 9 May 2016

Dennis Eric Nineham, New Testament scholar and Warden of Keble College, Oxford, from 1969 to 1979, died on 9 May 2016, aged 94. Born in Southampton, he was educated at the King Edward VI School there and at the Queen's College, Oxford, where he graduated in literae humaniores in 1943 and then in theology in 1945. After training for the priesthood at Lincoln Theological College he returned to Queen's as a fellow and praelector. He was professor of biblical and historical theology at King's College, London, from 1954 to 1958, professor of divinity in the University of London from 1958 to 1964, and Regius professor of divinity at Cambridge from 1964 to 1969. After stepping down from the wardenship of Keble College he was professor of theology at the University of Bristol from 1980 to 1986. He published many works of theology and New Testament scholarship, but was best known for The Use and Abuse of the Bible (1976) and his contribution to The Myth of God Incarnate (1977), both of which developed a critical approach to the historical accuracy of the gospels (which he believed did not invalidate their central message). He was survived by three children, his wife Ruth and one daughter having predeceased him.

Sir Iain Glidewell 

8 June 1924 – 8 May 2016

Sir Iain Derek Laing Glidewell PC, Court of Appeal judge, died on 8 May 2016, aged 91. Born in Wigan, he was educated at Bromsgrove School and Worcester College, Oxford, where he read jurisprudence. His studies were interrupted by service in the RAF during the Second World War but on demobilisation he returned to Oxford to compete his degree, graduating in 1948 and being called to the bar by Gray's Inn in 1949. Initially practising in Manchester, he built a formidable reputation in the areas of planning, the environment, and public law, and took silk in 1969. He was a recorder of the Crown Court (1976-80), a judge of the High Court of Justice (Queen's Bench Division) (1980-5), and a Lord Justice of Appeal (1985-95). He was active in retirement as a judge and later president of the Appeal Court for Gibraltar, and chairman of a review of the Crown Prosecution Service in 1997-8, which produced a critical report. He was knighted on being promoted to the High Court in 1980. He was survived by his wife Hilary and their three children.

Lakshmi Holmström 

1 June 1935 – 6 May 2016

Lakshmi Holmström (née Devanandan), writer and translator, died on 6 May 2016, aged 80. Born in Karnataka, the daughter of a Christian theologian, she was educated at the Women's Christian College in Madras and St Hilda's College, Oxford, where she read English, graduating in 1958. In 1960 she married Mark Holmström, whom she had met at Oxford; he worked first for Unesco in New York and then as a sociology lecturer at the University of East Anglia. Her first anthology was The Inner Courtyard: Stories by Indian Women (1990), followed in rapid succession by a large number of translations of poetry, novels and short stories, particularly from Tamil, culminating in Lost Evenings, Lost Lives (2016), which translated the voices of Tamil women caught up in Sri Lanka's long-running civil war. She was survived by her husband and their two daughters. 

Bill Kellaway

9 March 1926 – 4 May 2016 

Charles William (Bill) Kellaway, librarian and historian, died on 4 May 2016, aged 90. Born and brought up in Melbourne, Australia, the son of Charles Kellaway, a distinguished medical researcher, he was educated at Geelong Grammar School, but moved with his family to the UK in 1944. He read modern history at Lincoln College, Oxford, graduating in 1949, and the following year took a post as assistant librarian at the Guildhall Library, moving to the Institute of Historical Research, University of London, in 1960, and staying there until his retirement in 1984, from 1971 as secretary and librarian. He edited several volumes of documents and a Bibliography of Historical Works Issued in the UK, 1957-70 (in three volumes, 1962-72), wrote a history of The New England Company, 1649-1776 (1961), and from 1964 to 1983 was honorary general editor of the London Record Society, which he helped to found. He was survived by three children, his wife, the garden writer Deborah Kellaway (née Newton), whom he had met at Oxford, having predeceased him.

Alyson Bailes

6 April 1949 – 29 April 2016

The diplomat Alyson Judith Kirtley Bailes CMG died on 29 April 2016, aged 67. The daughter of teachers, she was born in Liverpool and educated at Belvedere School and Somerville College, Oxford, where she read modern history. She joined the Foreign Office soon after graduating in 1969, serving in Budapest, the UK delegation to NATO, Bonn, Peking, and Oslo, before becoming ambassador to Finland (2000-2). Along the way she served in an unusual number of secondments, as an assistant to the European Communities' 'Committee of Wise Men' (1979) and on loan to the Ministry of Defence (1979-81), later on attachment to the Royal Institute of International Affairs (1990) and as vice-president of the Institute of East West Studies in New York (1996-7), and finally as political director of the Western European Union (1997-2000). In retirement she was director of the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (2002-7), and a visiting professor at the University of Iceland and the College of Europe, Bruges. She was made an honorary fellow of Somerville in 2001.

Bryan Kibble

20 October 1938 – 28 April 2016

Bryan Kibble, physicist and metrologist, died on 28 April 2016, aged 77. Born in Letcombe Regis (then in Berkshire, now in Oxfordshire), the son of a police sergeant, he was educated at Abingdon School and Jesus College, Oxford, where he read physics, graduating in 1960, and stayed on to take a DPhil for a thesis on 'A study of resonance radiation'. He spent two years at the University of Windsor, Ontario, before returning to England to work at the National Physical Laboratory in Teddington, where he remained until his retirement in 1998. He was best known for his invention of the watt (or 'Kibble') balance, which led to the harmonisation of the world's electrical measurements and made possible the redefinition of the kilogram, due to be implemented in 2018. He was survived by his wife Anne and their two children.

Sir Richard Parsons

14 March 1928 – 23 April 2016

The diplomat Sir Richard Edmund Clement Fownes Parsons KCMG died on 23 April 2016, aged 88. The son of a GP, he was educated at Bembridge School on the Isle of Wight and Brasenose College, Oxford, where he read modern history, graduating in 1949. Following national service in the Royal Army Educational Corps he joined the Diplomatic Service in 1951, serving in Washington, Vientiane, Buenos Aires, Ankara, and Lagos, before becoming ambassador successively to Hungary (1976-9), Spain (1980-4, defusing diplomatic tensions during the Falklands war) and Sweden (1984-7). As John Haythorne he wrote four novels chronicling the exploits of Oliver Mandrake, a hapless diplomat and unlikely hero in the mould of Flashman, and in retirement he wrote several more novels under his own name. He also wrote plays, produced in London, Edinburgh and Brighton, and a memoir, Lying Abroad (2015). He was survived by his three sons, his wife Jenifer having predeceased him.

Sir Denys Wilkinson

5 September 1922 – 22 April 2016

Sir Denys Haigh Wilkinson FRS, physicist, died on 22 April 2016, aged 93. Born in Leeds, he was educated at Loughborough Grammar School and Jesus College, Cambridge, where he read natural sciences. After graduation in 1943 he was sent to Canada to work on atomic energy projects (almost dying of radiation sickness in the process). Returning to Britain in 1946, he was successively a university demonstrator, lecturer, and reader in physics before becoming professor of nuclear physics (1957-9) then professor of experimental physics (1959-76) at Oxford, and a student of Christ Church. From 1976 to 1987 he was Vice-Chancellor of the University of Sussex, succeeding Asa Briggs. He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 1956, knighted in 1974, received many other honours, and was closely involved in many professional bodies. In 2002 the building housing the astrophysics and particle physics sections of Oxford's Department of Physics was renamed the Denys Wilkinson Building. He was survived by his wife Helen and the three daughters of his first marriage.

Lord Walton of Detchant

16 September 1922 – 21 April 2016

John Nicholas Walton, Baron Walton of Detchant TD, FRCP, neurologist and Warden of Green College from 1983 to 1989, died on 21 April 2016, aged 93. Born in Co Durham, the son of teachers, he was educated at Alderman Wraith Grammar School in Spennymoor, then King's College Medical School in Newcastle, qualifying MB BS in 1945 and, after national service in the Royal Army Medical Corps, taking his MD in 1952. With the exception of early career posts at Harvard and Queen Square, he spent most of his career in Newcastle, where he became a consultant neurologist in 1958, and professor of neurology at the University of Newcastle in 1968. A world authority on muscular dystrophy, he received many honours and achieved the rare distinction of serving as president of the British Medical Association (1980-2), the General Medical Council (1982-9), and the Royal Society of Medicine (1984-6). He was knighted in 1979 and made a life peer in 1989. He was survived by his three children, his wife Mary having predeceased him.

Viscount Camrose

15 June 1937 – 18 April 2016

Adrian Michael Berry, fourth Viscount Camrose, journalist, died on 18 April 2016, aged 78. His father was the newspaper proprietor Michael Berry, who disclaimed the hereditary peerage but was made a life peer as Baron Hartwell (and was chairman of the Daily Telegraph from 1954 to 1987), and his grandparents were the first Viscount Camrose, who acquired an interest in the paper in 1927, and, on his mother Pamela’s side, the politician F.E. Smith, first Earl of Birkenhead. He was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read modern history, and launched the satirical magazineParson's Pleasure, a forerunner to Private Eye. On graduating in 1959 he became a journalist, working for the Walsall Observer, Birmingham Post, Investor's Chronicle, New York Herald Tribune, and Time magazine, but gravitated to his family's paper, becoming science correspondent from 1977 to 1996, and thereafter consulting editor for science. He also wrote a column for Astronomy Now, and a large number of popular science books, including The Next Ten Thousand Years (1974) and The Super-Intelligent Machine(1983). He succeeded his father as Viscount Camrose in 2001, and was survived by his wife Marina and their two children.

John R. W. D. Jones

14 June 1967 – 18 April 2016

John Richard William Day Jones QC, barrister, died on 18 April 2016, aged 48. Born in Wimbledon, the son of a doctor, he attended the sixth-form college Mander Portman Woodward before studying philosophy, politics and economics at St Edmund Hall, Oxford, followed by master's degrees in law at City University and George Washington University. He was called to the bar by Lincoln's Inn in 1992. Specialising in human rights and extradition law, he was a legal officer for the International Criminal Court for the former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. Though he acted for both the prosecution and the defence, he was best known as a defence counsel for some notorious figures accused of human rights violations, including Charles Taylor, former president of Liberia, and Saif al-Islam Gaddafi. He published a number of highly-regarded articles and books, including International Criminal Practice (1998) and the Extradition and Mutual Legal Assistance Handbook (2005), both of which went into further editions. He was survived by his wife Miša and their two sons.

Peter Janson-Smith

5 September 1922 – 15 April 2016

(John) Peter Janson-Smith, literary agent, died on 15 April 2016, aged 93. Born in Essex, the son of a clergyman, he was brought up mainly in Dorset, and educated at Sherborne School and St Edmund Hall, Oxford, where he took the war-shortened course in English, graduating in 1942. He spent the remainder of the Second World War as a radar specialist in the Royal Artillery. After demobilisation he was helped by the university appointments board to find a job as assistant to the literary agent A.D. Peters. He subsequently worked for Curtis Brown before setting up his own agency. Among the authors he represented were Ian Fleming, Gavin Maxwell, and Anthony Burgess, and he managed the literary estates of Fleming, Agatha Christie, Georgette Heyer, and A.A. Milne. He was survived by his partner Lili Pohlmann, and by four children from his three marriages.

Howard Marks

13 August 1945 – 10 April 2016

Howard Marks, drug smuggler, died on 10 April 2016, aged 70. Born in Glamorganshire, the son of a captain in the merchant navy, and speaking only Welsh for his first five years, he was educated at Garw Grammar School and Balliol College, Oxford, where he read physics and first discovered cannabis. He later took a diploma in the history and philosophy of science. He graduated rapidly from small-time dealing through wholesaling to smuggling cannabis on a large scale, forging connections with the IRA and later the mafia. Arrested in Amsterdam in 1973, he skipped bail and resumed his activities, which were now international. In 1980 he was again arrested (in the UK); at his trial he claimed he was working for MI6 and was acquitted of drug smuggling, though found guilty of using false passports. Reputedly responsible for 10% of global cannabis smuggling, his luck finally ran out in 1988 when he was arrested in Majorca, extradited to the US, and sentenced to 25 years in jail. Released early, after seven years, for good behaviour, he returned to South Wales, stood for parliament for the Legalise Cannabis Party, wrote two autobiographies – Mr Nice (1996) was later made into a film, released in 2010 – as well as a Book of Dope Stories(2001) and a thriller, and enjoyed life as a minor celebrity. He had three daughters and a son. 

Charles Thomas

24 April 1928 – 7 April 2016

The archaeologist (Antony) Charles Thomas CBE, FBA, died on 7 April 2016, aged 87. Born in Camborne, the son of a solicitor, he was educated at Winchester College and Corpus Christi College, Oxford, where he read jurisprudence, graduating in 1951. He then took a diploma in prehistoric archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, London, and swiftly established a reputation as an expert on early British archaeology, particularly that of his native Cornwall. He was a lecture in archaeology at the University of Edinburgh (1957-67) and professor of archaeology at the University of Leicester (1967-71) before becoming the founding professor of Cornish studies at the University of Exeter, and director of the Institute of Cornish Studies, initially in Pool, near Redruth, but then in Truro, where he remained until his retirement in 1991. He published widely, and often controversially, on the archaeology and history of Celtic and early Christian Britain. He was elected an FBA in 1989 and among other distinctions was Sir John Rhys fellow at Jesus College in 1985-6. He was survived by his wife, the writer Jessica Mann, and their four children.

Michael Hawkes

7 May 1929 – 2 April 2016 

Michael John Hawkes, banker, died on 2 April 2016, aged 86. Born in Welwyn, Hertfordshire, the son of a newspaper executive, he was educated at Bedford School and New College, Oxford, where he read modern history, graduating in 1952, having been one of four New College undergraduates to represent Oxford in the 1951 boat race, when the Oxford boat sank. (A keen rower and follower of rowing, he was a member of the Leander Club for 66 years.) After a short stint in insurance broking he joined the merchant bank Kleinwort and Sons in 1954, becoming a director of Kleinwort Benson in 1967, a vice-chairman in 1974, deputy chairman in 1982, and eventually chairman in 1983. He stepped down through ill-health in 1987 but remained deputy chairman of the Kleinwort Benson Group until 1990 and spent an active retirement in Cornwall and Berkshire. He was survived by his second wife, Elizabeth, and by the four children of his first marriage.

Gareth Jones

10 November 1930 – 2 April 2016

The legal scholar Gareth Hywel Jones QC, FBA, died on 2 April 2016, aged 85. The son of a chartered surveyor, he was educated at Rhondda County School for Boys, University College, London, where he read law, St Catharine's College, Cambridge, here he took his LLB, and Harvard University, where he took his LLM. He was called to the bar by Lincoln's Inn in 1955 and taught at Oriel and Exeter colleges, Oxford, from 1956 to 1958. He subsequently taught at King's College, London, before returning to Cambridge in 1961 as a university lecturer and fellow of Trinity College. From 1975 to 1998 he was Downing professor of the laws of England, and from 1978 to 1981 he was chairman of the Faculty of Law. He served twice as vice-master of Trinity College, from 1986 to 1992 and from 1996 to 1999. He was elected an FBA in 1982, and took silk in 1986. He published widely on legal history, contract, the law of restitution (including a seminal book with Robert Goff in 1966), property and trusts, and was regarded as one of the foremost legal scholars of his generation. He was survived by his partner, Dilys, and by the three children of his marriage; his wife, Vivienne, died in 2004.

Duncan Poore

25 May 1925 – 22 March 2016

(Martin Edward) Duncan Poore FRSB, FRGS, ecologist and conservationist, died on 22 March 2016, aged 90. He was educated at Trinity College, Glenalmond, and Clare College, Cambridge, where he initially read classics but switched to natural sciences after war service at Bletchley Park and in Ceylon. His Cambridge PhD thesis, making pioneering use of aerial photography, was on the vegetation of Woodwalton Fen. His subsequent posts included a professorship of botany at the University of Malaya (1959-65), a lectureship in the Forestry Department at Oxford (1965-6), the directorship of Nature Conservancy (1966-73), the scientific directorship of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (1974-8), the directorship of the Commonwealth Forestry Institute at Oxford (1980-3), and the directorship of the forestry and land use programme of the International Institute for Environment and Development (1983-6). He was a recognised international authority on the management of tropical forests. He was survived by his wife Judy and their two sons.

Daphne Thomas

7 November 1917 – 17 March 2016

Daphne Mair Mitchell Thomas, secretary of the Oxford Society, died on 17 March 2016, aged 98. Born in Llanrwst, she was educated at Howell's School, Denbigh, and St Hugh's College, Oxford, where she read English. On graduating in 1939 she joined the WAAF and spent most of the Second World War working in radar. In 1943 she married Alex Lennie, with whom she had a son, but the marriage ended in the late 1940s and she returned to Oxford, where she soon became assistant secretary, then secretary of the Oxford Society, serving in the latter post for some thirty years. In retirement she was a full-time volunteer, running the Mind shop in Oxford. She was survived by her son.

John Semken

9 January 19218 March 2016

John Douglas Semken CB, MC, legal adviser, died on 8 March 2016, aged 95. Born in London, the son of a solicitor, he was educated at St Albans School, then was articled to Sir Louis Gluckstein, at his father’s firm. In 1940 he was commissioned into the Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry, an armoured regiment, and he fought with them in North Africa and north-west Europe, winning his MC in Normandy soon after D-Day. On demobilisation with the rank of major he took up a place at Pembroke College, Oxford, where he read jurisprudence, graduating in 1948 and taking a BCL in 1949. He was called to the bar by Lincoln’s Inn in the latter year and practised at the Chancery bar until 1954, when he joined the legal adviser’s branch of the Home Office; he ended his career as legal adviser to the Home Office from 1977 to 1983, and a member of the Criminal Law Revision Committee. He lived latterly in Aldeburgh, and was survived by three sons, his wife Margaret having predeceased him.

Michael Armstrong

2 September 1934 – 7 March 2016

(John) Michael Armstrong, educationist, died on 7 March 2016, aged 81. The son of a Methodist minister, he was born in Norfolk, and attended Culford School, near Bury St Edmunds, and Wadham College, Oxford, where he read literae humaniores, graduating in 1956. A committed advocate of comprehensive schooling and progressive education methods, he began teaching at Wandsworth School for Boys. In the late 1960s he took time out to work with Michael Young at the Institute of Community Studies, followed by a period working on a Nuffield Foundation project on teaching methods, before returning to teaching, notably at Countesthorpe Community College, then Sherard Primary School in Leicestershire, and finally Harwell School in Oxfordshire, where he was headmaster until his retirement. He wrote several books and articles on education and children's learning, most notably Closely Observed Children: The Diary of a Primary Classroom (1980), and was a regular contributor to the Universities and Left Review, and later the progressive educational journal Forum, whose editorial board he chaired. He was survived by his wife Isobel, a literary critic, and their three children.

Tessa Solesby

5 April 1932 – 3 March 2016

Tessa Audrey Hilda Solesby CMG, diplomat, died on 3 March 2016, aged 83. Born in London, the daughter of a businessman, she was educated at Clifton High School, Bristol, and St Hugh's College, Oxford, where she read modern history, graduating in 1954. After working briefly for the Ministry of Labour and National Service she joined the Diplomatic Service in 1956. She served in Manila, Lisbon, the UK missions to the UN in Geneva and New York (the latter twice), Brussels, East Berlin, as head of the Central African Department at the FCO (1982-6), and in Pretoria (1986-7) before finishing her career as leader of the UK delegation to the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva, with the personal rank of ambassador (1987-92). In retirement she settled in North Yorkshire, where she was chief officer of Age Concern in York (1992-7). She never married.

Bridget Lindley

7 November 1959 – 2 March 2016

Bridget Lindley OBE, solicitor, died on 2 March 2016, aged 56. Born in Essex, she spent most of her childhood in Suffolk, where her parents were farmers. She read modern history with French at Somerville College, Oxford, and undertook her legal training at the College of Law before doing her articles with Darlington & Parkinson. Her parents had divorced when she was twelve, and she was drawn to family law, spending 27 years with the Family Rights Group, where she was deputy chief executive and principal legal adviser. She was a successful lobbyist for law reform in the areas of guardianship and adoption, and fought many cases on behalf of parents or families of children who had been taken into care. She was survived by her husband, Simon Baron-Cohen, professor of developmental psychopathology at Cambridge, and their three children.

Peter Mathias

10 January 1928 - 1 March 2016

Peter Mathias CBE, FBA, Chichele Professor of Economic History and fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, from 1969 to 1987, died on 1 March 2016, aged 88. Born in Bath, he was educated at Colston's School, Bristol, and Jesus College, Cambridge, where he took the history tripos, graduating in 1951. He was a research fellow at Jesus College from 1952 to 1955, and director of studies in history and a fellow of Queens' College, Cambridge, from 1955 to 1968. He was a curator of the Bodleian Library from 1972 to 1987. He was awarded an Oxford DLit in 1985 and became an emeritus fellow of All Souls College on his return to Cambridge in 1987, when he became Master of Downing College until 1995. He wrote a large number of books and articles on early modern and nineteenth-century British economic history, including the industrial revolution. Active in many professional organisations, among many other honours he was elected an FBA in 1977 and was its treasurer from 1980 to 1989. He was survived by his three children, his wife Ann having predeceased him.

Lord Coulsfield

24 April 1934 - 28 February 2016

The Rt Hon John Taylor Cameron, Lord Coulsfield PC, judge, died on 28 February 2016, aged 81. Born in Dundee, he was educated at Fettes College, Corpus Christi College, Oxford, where he read literae humaniores, graduating in 1956, and the University of Edinburgh, where he took his LLB. Admitted to the Faculty of Advocates in 1960, he was a lecturer in public law at the University of Edinburgh from 1960 to 1964, but thereafter concentrated on his legal career. He was made a Scottish QC in 1973 and was keeper of the Advocates' Library from 1977 to 1987, before becoming a Senator of the College of Justice in Scotland from 1987 to 2002. In 2000-1 he was one of three judges of the special Scottish court in the Netherlands which found Abdelbaset al-Megrahi guilty of planting the bomb which blew up PanAm Flight 103 over Lockerbie in 1988. From 1995 to 2003 he was editor of the Scottish Law and Practice Quarterly, and he was a joint author of the twelfth edition of Gloag and Henderson's Law of Scotland (2007). He was survived by his wife Bridget.

Michael Heathcoat Amory

2 October 1941 - 24 February 2016

Michael Fitzgerald Heathcoat Amory, financier and conservationist, died on 24 February 2016, aged 74. His father died in Normandy in 1944, and his mother subsequently married his father's cousin; the Conservative minister David Heathcoat Amory was his younger half-brother. He was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read modern history, graduating in 1963. He joined the family lacemaking business but soon moved into fund management, first with Morgan Grenfell, then with Tarbutt & Co, and finally with Jupiter Asset Management, which merged with Tarbutt in 1986. Between then and 2000 funds under Jupiter’s management grew a hundred-fold, to £12.5 billion. In the latter year Jupiter’s founder, John Duffield, left to form his own business, having fallen out with Commerzbank, which owned 75% of Jupiter, but Heathcoat Amory chose to stay. Meanwhile, in 1966 he had inherited an estate at Chevithorne Barton from his paternal grandmother, and over the next forty years he built up a world-renowned collection of oak trees, eventually comprising more than 450 oaks of more than 200 species. He was survived by his second wife, Arabella, their two daughters, and the son of his first marriage.

Abbot Patrick Barry

6 December 1917 - 21 February 2016

Abbot Noel St John (Patrick) Barry, headmaster of Ampleforth College from 1964 to 1979 and Abbot of Ampleforth from 1984 to 1997, died on 21 February 2016, aged 98. Born in Wallasey, the son of an Irish doctor, he was educated at Ampleforth and St Benet's Hall, Oxford, where he read literae humaniores, graduating in 1942. He then returned to Ampleforth as librarian, head of classics, a housemaster from 1954, and then headmaster. Notably shy, he had a somewhat fearsome reputation among his pupils, but remained in touch with many. He was the first headmaster of a Roman Catholic school to chair the Headmasters' Conference, in 1975. From 1985 to 1997, as well as acting as Abbot of Ampleforth, he was the senior assistant to the Abbot President of the English Benedictine Congregation from 1985 to 1997, and chairman of the Union of Monastic Superiors from 1989 to 1995. He developed close links with a group of lay-led co-educational schools in Chile, modelled on Ampleforth, and in 2005 published a book on them, A Cloister in the World.

Angela Croome 

22 February 1925 – 17 February 2016

Angela Croome, journalist and author, died on 17 February 2016, aged 90. Born in Peking, the daughter of a Royal Navy officer who subsequently worked for the Chinese government, she served during the Second World War in the WRNS, mainly on naval aircraft maintenance. After the war she read English at Somerville College, Oxford, graduating in 1948. She spent several decades as a freelance journalist, and a science columnist for theDaily Telegraph. She wrote a comprehensive book on Hovercraft (1960) and later became an authority on the history of underwater archaeology. At the time of her death she was deputy editor of the Journal of Nautical Archaeology. She lived for many years with Edna Lumb, a Yorkshire-born painter, mainly of industrial subjects. After her death in 1992 Croome ran the Edna Lumb Trust while maintaining her interest in nautical archaeology.

Lord Avebury

29 September 1928 - 14 February 2016

Eric Reginald Lubbock, fourth Baron Avebury, engineer and politician, died on 14 February 2016, aged 87. The son of the Hon Maurice Lubbock, sixth son of the first Baron Avebury, and vice-chairman of Rolls Royce, he was evacuated to Canada during the Second World War and was a pupil at Upper Canada College, before returning to England where he went briefly to Harrow before reading engineering at Balliol College, Oxford. After graduating in 1949 and two years' national service in the Welsh Guards, he joined Rolls Royce. Standing as a Liberal, he won a sensational by-election at Orpington in 1962 but lost his seat in 1970. He succeeded his cousin the following year, and was an elected member of the House of Lords from 1999, sitting as a Liberal Democrat. A member of Amnesty International, he helped found and from 1976 to 1997 chaired the British Parliamentary Human Rights Group. Among many other positions he was patron of the Buddhist Prison Chaplaincy and the Traveller Movement. He was survived by his second wife, Lindsay, their son, and the three children of his first marriage.

Sir Christopher Zeeman

4 February 1925 - 13 February 2016

Sir (Erik) Christopher Zeeman FRS, mathematician and Principal of Hertford College, Oxford, from 1988 to 1995, died on 13 February 2016, aged 91. Born in Japan, the son of a Danish father and a British mother, he was educated at Christ's Hospital, Horsham, and, after four years' service as a flying officer in the RAF, Christ's College, Cambridge, where he read mathematics, staying on to take a PhD on topology under Shaun Wylie. He was a fellow of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, from 1953 to 1964, when he became the founding professor of mathematics at Warwick University, where from scratch he built up a world-ranking mathematics department. He was a skilled communicator, and was the first mathematician to give the Royal Institution Christmas Lectures, in 1978. Elected an FRS in 1975 and knighted in 1991, he was, among other posts, president of the London Mathematical Society, from 1986 to 1988. He was survived by his wife Rosemary, their five children, and the daughter from his first marriage. 

Margaret Forster

25 May 19388 February 2016

The writer and biographer Margaret Forster FRSL died on 8 February 2016, aged 77. Born in Carlisle, the daughter of a factory worker, she was educated at Carlisle and County High School for Girls, and Somerville College, Oxford, where she read modern history, graduating in 1960, the year she married the writer Hunter Davies, whom she had met as a teenager. For two years after graduating she was a teacher in Islington. In 1965 she scored an immediate success with Georgy Girl, later made into a film starring Lynn Redgrave. She went on to write some 25 novels, several volumes of memoirs, including the acclaimed Hidden Lives (1995), and fourteen biographies. Her biography of Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1988) won the Heinemann Award, and that of Daphne du Maurier (1993) won the Fawcett Book Prize. She also wrote a history of feminism, Significant Sisters(1984). She was survived by her husband and their three children.

Philip Taverner

2 July 1929 - 6 February 2016

Philip Taverner, marketing executive and exhibition organiser, died on 6 February 2016, aged 86. Born in Chelmsford, the son of a Bank of England official, he was educated at Bryanston School and University College, Oxford, where he read philosophy, politics and economics, and joined the dramatic society, acting alongside Maggie Smith in Twelfth Night. After graduating in 1954 he worked in public relations for the tyre company Pirelli before becoming marketing director at Times Newspapers. It was in this capacity that he organised the record-breaking 'Treasures of Tutankhamun' exhibition at the British Museum in 1972 and the 'Genius of China' exhibition at the Royal Academy the following year (both sponsored by the Times). He later set up Carlton Cleeve with Peter Saabor to organise other museum 'blockbusters', but by the late 1970s most museums began to organise big exhibitions in-house, and he opened a garden centre in Hampshire. He was later involved in setting up the short-lived Empire and Commonwealth Museum in Bristol. He was survived by his wife Susannah ('Zan') and their three sons. 

David Menhennet

4 December 1928 - 5 February 2016

David Menhennet CB, librarian of the House of Commons from 1976 to 1991, died on 5 February 2016, aged 87. Born in Redruth, Cornwall, he was educated at Truro School and, after national service in the navy, Oriel College, Oxford, where he read modern languages, graduating in French and German in 1952. He stayed on as Bishop Fraser research scholar at Oriel, Laming fellow at the Queen's College, and Zaharoff travelling scholar, while working on a thesis on 'Bernardin de Saint-Pierre and antiquity', for which he was awarded a DPhil in 1960. Meanwhile he joined the House of Commons Library as a clerk in 1954, working is way up to become deputy librarian in 1967. As librarian he oversaw a transformation in the services offered, expanding the Library's research capabilities, and introducing a public information office and a service for schools. By the time of his retirement the Library had 158 staff (more than five times the number it had when he joined). He wrote a large number of articles and books on the House of Commons and librarianship. He was survived by his wife Audrey and their two sons.

William Gaskill

24 June 1930– 4 February 2016

The theatre director William Gaskill died on 4 February 2016, aged 85. Born in Shipley, Yorkshire, the son of a teacher, he was educated at Salt High School, Shipley, where he started an amateur theatre group with Tony Richardson, and Hertford College, Oxford, followed by six months in Paris studying mime and drama. Although for most of his career he worked as a freelance stage director, he was particularly associated with the English Stage Company at the Royal Court (where he was assistant artistic director, 1957-9, and later artistic director, 1965-72), the National Theatre, and the Royal Shakespeare Company. From 1973 to 1983 he was director of the Joint Stock Theatre Company. He also worked frequently on and off Broadway. He published a memoir of his association with the Royal Court, and a book of essays. He was survived by a sister, Ruth.

Sir Jeremy Morse

10 December 19284 February 2016

Sir (Christopher) Jeremy Morse KCMG, banker, died on 4 February 2016, aged 87. Born in London, the son of a solicitor from a major brewing family, he was educated at Winchester College and, after national service with the King's Royal Rifle Corps, New College, Oxford, where he read literae humaniores, and won the Chancellor's Latin verse and prose prizes, the Craven and Hertford scholarships, and the Gaisford prose prize. He became a prize fellow of All Souls after graduating in 1953, but eschewed an academic career for one in banking, initially joining Glyn, Mills & Co. In 1965 he became an executive director of the Bank of England, and from 1972 to 1974 he was chairman of the deputies of the Committee of Twenty at the IMF, being knighted KCMG in 1975; he was then deputy chairman (1975-7) and chairman (1977-93) of Lloyds Bank, rescuing it from a parlous state and overseeing a steady growth in its share of the market. Among many other positions he was Warden of Winchester College (1987-97) and Chancellor of Bristol University (1989-2003). He published a book of chess problems, and was a frequent winner of crossword competitions. His friend Colin Dexter named his fictional detective after him; Dexter explained, 'Jeremy was the cleverest man I had ever met and I intended Morse also to be fiendishly clever'. He was survived by his wife Brenda and four children, a daughter having predeceased him.

Lord Roper

10 September 1935– 29 January 2016

The Rt Hon John Francis Hodgess Roper, Baron Roper PC, politician, died on 29 January 2016, aged 80. Born in Norwich, the son of a Congregational minister, he was educated at William Hulme's Grammar School, Manchester, Reading School, and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read philosophy, politics and economics, and was president of the UN Student Association. After a Harkness fellowship he was successively a research fellow in economic statistics, assistant lecturer in economics, and lecturer in economics at the University of Manchester before becoming Labour MP for Farnworth in 1970. In 1981 he joined the fledgling SDP, and failed to gain re-election at the 1983 election. He subsequently worked for the Royal Institute of International Affairs (Chatham House) as editor of International Affairs, head of the international security programme, and director of studies, then from 1990 to 1995 he was head of the WEU Institute for Security Studies in Paris. He was made a life peer in 2000, and was Liberal Democrat chief whip in the House of Lords from 2001 to 2005. He published several books on defence policy. He was survived by his daughter, Kathryn, his wife Hope (daughter of another Labour MP, John Edwards) having predeceased him.

Nicholas Bagnall

22 September 1924 – 27 January 2016

The journalist Nicholas Bagnall died on 27 January 2016, aged 91. The son of an army officer who later became a Church of England vicar, he was educated at Bryanston School and Wadham College, Oxford, where after taking classical moderations he switched to English, graduating in 1947. He began his career in journalism with the Church Times before moving to theDaily Telegraph in 1954, thus beginning a long association with that paper and its Sunday sister (launched in 1961) which would last into his eighties; he was variously a features writer, leader writer, education correspondent, letters editor, book reviews editor, columnist, and latterly book reviewer; for nearly twenty years from its launch in 1990 he was also an erudite columnist on words for the Independent on Sunday. He wrote several books on the English language, and an autobiography, A Little Overmatter (2002). He was survived by his wife Ann and their two children.

Michael Sheringham

2 June 1948 – 21 January 2016

Michael Hugh Tempest Sheringham FBA, Marshal Foch Professor of French Literature and fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, since 2004, died on 21 January 2016, aged 67. Born in Cairo, the son of a British colonial official and a poet who was a francophone Egyptian Copt, he was educated at Wallingford County Grammar School, and the newly-opened University of Kent at Canterbury, where he read French and later took his PhD. He was a lecturer at the New University of Ulster for a year before moving back to Canterbury, where he became a professor in 1992. He was then professor of French at Royal Holloway from 1995 to 2004. He was particularly known for his work on twentieth-century French literature, and for his books on two hundred years of French Autobiography (1993) and Everyday Life: Theories and Practices from Surrealism to the Present (2006). He was elected an FBA in 2010. He was survived by his wife Priscilla and their two children.

Lord Weidenfield

13 September 1919 – 20 January 2016

The publisher and philanthropist (Arthur) George Weidenfeld, Baron Weidenfeld GBE, died on 20 January 2016, aged 96. Born in Vienna, he was educated at the Piaristen Gymnasium and the University of Vienna, but escaped to England following the Anschluss. From 1939 to 1946 he worked for the BBC. In 1945 he founded Contact Magazine and Books, and in 1948, with Nigel Nicolson, the phenomenally successful publishing house of Weidenfeld & Nicolson. A noted party-giver and a generous philanthropist, he was a major benefactor of Oxford, funding the Weidenfeld-Hoffmann scholarships for students from developing countries, and serving as vice-chairman of the University of Oxford Campaign in the 1990s. He was an honorary fellow of St Peter's and St Anne's colleges, and received an honorary Oxford DLitt in 2010. He was knighted in 1968, made a life peer in 1976, and appointed GBE in 2011. He was survived by his fourth wife, Annabelle Whetstone, and the daughter of his first marriage.

Robin Fletcher

30 May 1922 – 15 January 2016

Robin Anthony Fletcher DSC, OBE, Warden of Rhodes House from 1980 to 1989, died on 15 January 2016, aged 93. Born in Godalming, the son of a schoolmaster, he was educated at Marlborough College and, after war service with the Royal Navy which included dangerous missions with the Levant Schooner Flotilla, in command of a commandeered caïque with a Greek crew (for which he awarded his DSC), Trinity College, Oxford, where he read medieval and modern Greek. He later completed a DPhil on the Festival of the Annunciation, from early Byzantine texts, but already on graduating in 1949 he was appointed a university lecturer in modern Greek; he also served as domestic bursar of Trinity College from 1980 to 1989. A keen hockey player, he represented England from 1949 to 1955, and Great Britain at the 1952 Olympic Games, when the team won the bronze medal. As Warden of Rhodes House he was particularly known for his pastoral care, and for his efforts to introduce scholarships for black South African students. He lived latterly on Orkney. He was survived by a son, Denys, his wife Jinny and another son having predeceased him.

Glyn Humphreys

28 December 1954 – 14 January 2016

Glyn William Humphreys FRSocMed, FBA, Watts Professor of Psychology and fellow of Wolfson College, Oxford, since 2011, died on 14 January 2016, aged 61. Born in Ormskirk, the son of a lecturer in building project management, he was educated at Merchant Taylors' Boys' School, Crosby, and the University of Bristol, where he read psychology, graduating in 1976 and taking his PhD in 1980. He was a lecturer in psychology at Birkbeck College, London, from 1979 to 1987, then a senior lecturer and from 1988 professor at the University of Birmingham. He published widely on different aspects of cognitive neuroscience, including attentional disorders, visual agnosia and brain injury, and his research led in particular to improvements in the diagnosis and rehabilitation of stroke victims. He was elected an FRSocMed in 2008 and an FBA in 2009. He was survived by his wife Jane and their three children.

Dr Alex May, who compiled these obituaries, is Research Editor at the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.